Does my body tell me it doesn't like Strength Training? Does my body tell me it doesn't like Strength Training? - Page 3

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Thread: Does my body tell me it doesn't like Strength Training?

  1. #21
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    • starting strength seminar june 2022
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    I don't recall where I read to do this, but I have tried it. (running and only breathing through nose. Only works when running slow enough, and it sucks. If I remember correctly, the author said it helps with heart rate or something like that. May have been Mark Sisson from Primal. I don't do it anymore, ever. And didn't last bc it felt a bit stupid and pointless.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Troll. Has to be. Nobody is this stupid.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by vk60187 View Post
    I appreciate all of the responses. Believe me itís very frustrating having hypertension even as Iím trying everything I can to get it down. And, btw, frustration doesnít help BP. I think the reason for lower BP after jogs is it forces my breathing into a pattern that helps me relax and stay relaxed. Iím sure if I could figure out to relax quickly, I would not need to run. FYI, I run breathing strictly through my nose, in and out.
    Stop using your blood pressure as a crutch for everything. I have it. It's a familial hereditary disease in my case and it's generally shit. 5mg of Amplodipine is all you need? Fuck. I'll take that any day. I take 320mg of Valsartan, 10mg of Amlodipine, 0.1mg of Clonodine and I range around 140/75. And I'm 39. It's been a problem my entire adult life. Running made mine worse. Much worse. Running the NLP improved it for me quite a bit, and I hit a sweet spot somewhere along the way that brought me back to 120/80 for a while.

    I gained a little extra weight because I wanted to get some better deadlift numbers and my BP went up after that. A lot of that, I think, had to do with the Monster Mash concoction I was making and the chicken broth I was using. It had a lot of sodium in it and I was eating it 3-4 times a day. I probably drink too much whiskey on the weekends, too.

    Run the NLP and gain actual muscle mass. There will likely be a sweet spot for you where you'll reach a decent equilibrium. I'll probably cut a little weight to achieve that, but I won't make excuses for not doing the lifts just because I have high BP.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan DCNT View Post
    I'd love to know how all these fucking weirdos find their way here.
    Right? Just the other day there was some guy asking how to wipe his ass.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by vk60187 View Post
    I don’t see an option to delete my account. Please delete.
    No.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank_B View Post
    Stop using your blood pressure as a crutch for everything. I have it. It's a familial hereditary disease in my case and it's generally shit. 5mg of Amplodipine is all you need? Fuck. I'll take that any day. I take 320mg of Valsartan, 10mg of Amlodipine, 0.1mg of Clonodine and I range around 140/75. And I'm 39. It's been a problem my entire adult life. Running made mine worse. Much worse. Running the NLP improved it for me quite a bit, and I hit a sweet spot somewhere along the way that brought me back to 120/80 for a while.

    I gained a little extra weight because I wanted to get some better deadlift numbers and my BP went up after that. A lot of that, I think, had to do with the Monster Mash concoction I was making and the chicken broth I was using. It had a lot of sodium in it and I was eating it 3-4 times a day. I probably drink too much whiskey on the weekends, too.

    Run the NLP and gain actual muscle mass. There will likely be a sweet spot for you where you'll reach a decent equilibrium. I'll probably cut a little weight to achieve that, but I won't make excuses for not doing the lifts just because I have high BP.
    Iím sorry to hear about your BP. Btw, 5mg did not do anything for me at first. I ended up taking two doses, 10mg and it flattened me at 110s/70s. I took it at am and late pm. Now I take my med, single dose at evening. There are studies that say BP meds in the evening are more effective. FYI, maybe you too can cut back.

    Why Taking Blood Pressure Meds at Bedtime May Be More Effective

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by vk60187 View Post
    I have a weird question for you. First of all, I'm 45yo male, taking antihypertensive med (5mg Amlodipine) daily for my blood pressure. I'm also having only one kidney now as the other one was removed due to having cancer in it. My goal is to lose weight (I'm 6ft6in, 230lbs now and want to ideally be at 200lb). I've been doing starting strength on and off, I'm up to 165lb squat, 185lb deadlift and 140lb bench press.

    Today, after I worked out with the above weights, I felt a bit strange, so decided to take blood pressure measurement. I was at 140/90. Not terrible but not good for me as I'm normally 120/80. I then went for a jog/easy run at around 12 min/mile pace, for 3.12 mi (5k), breathing only through my nose the entire time, and my BP came down and stayed between 112-120/70s range. Much better than a few hours post workout.

    As far as eating today, I skipped breakfast and had chicken soup for lunch, with some rye bread and slices of ham.

    So, here is my question. It seems that my body is telling me to stick to cardio rather than strength. Is this how you'd interpret it?
    Intentionally replying to your original post. First, welcome aboard. I'm sorry you weren't exactly warmly received as it seems you are making an honest attempt. I would have given up after the first video.

    I did the worlds worst NLP (if you want to call it that) while trying to qualify for the Boston marathon. My squats looked about like yours. Amazingly I still got stronger.

    I will let other comment about the lifts because there are way more qualified people. I also have intermittent high (or highish) blood pressure although I don't medicate.

    One thing you never mentioned is how long after various training modalities your blood pressure stays elevated. When you perform a barbell lift (properly), blood pressure transitively increases due to the intra-abdominal pressure increase because, well, that the basics of physics. After you complete a lift, blood pressure should return to normal levels fairly quickly. But hopefully not too quickly or you might pass out. (Although at pedestrian weights, if that does happen, it's more likely that you are holding air in your head)

    Transient variations in blood pressure during running are much different and they vary by age and athlete. They are also affected by hydration status. Your body will *certainly* increase the blood flow to the leg muscles due to lower peripheral resistance. This generally lowers blood pressure. However, sometimes vasoconstriction is necessary in order to maintain the blood pressure further from the working muscle. And so you might get different results during running depending on *where* you measure blood pressure (Its usually measured with an arm cuff). The transient response after running will depend again on things like hydration status and also how intense the bout of running. The heart rate will come down fairly quickly. Sometimes vasoconstriction immediately follows in the legs and there isn't much transient change. If that doesn't occur, you can get blood pooling in the legs which reduced blood pressure in other parts of your body.

    As far as I know, mild hypertension is not a contraindication to either running or lifting weights but I am not a doctor.

    If you are really concerned about this, you will need to measure blood before, immediately after, and then at intervals (maybe two hours) beyond each training mode. If some training is really exacerbating hypertension you should talk to a doctor. But my guess is that you will see a return to baseline.

    Finally, as others have mentioned your squat is not to depth. You have to buy the blue book and read it. I mean its $29.99 and the author answers question. I feel somewhat guilty that Rip charges so little (but not too guilty since I did pay a thousand dollars to come to the conference)

    Missing squat depth means that you are loading way more weight on your back than you would if squatting to depth. That might be raising intrabdominal pressure more than a squat to depth (with lower weight) would. By the time you get back to the weight you are squatting now, you will have more muscle mass and lower peripheral resistance which might alleviate the transient high blood pressure. But this is just conjecture. You'll have to try it.

    I hope this helps.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by vk60187 View Post
    I appreciate all of the responses. Believe me itís very frustrating having hypertension even as Iím trying everything I can to get it down. And, btw, frustration doesnít help BP. I think the reason for lower BP after jogs is it forces my breathing into a pattern that helps me relax and stay relaxed. Iím sure if I could figure out to relax quickly, I would not need to run. FYI, I run breathing strictly through my nose, in and out.
    I think there's another activity that requires breathing in a steady pattern...forgot what it was though. Who the hell told you to only breathe through your nose while lifting though? That's crazy. About as crazy as lifting heavy weights in a facemask.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommanderFun View Post
    I think there's another activity that requires breathing in a steady pattern...forgot what it was though. Who the hell told you to only breathe through your nose while lifting though? That's crazy. About as crazy as lifting heavy weights in a facemask.
    This forum is not about running or jogging and I'm not sure where one draws the line between running and jogging anyway. But if you are able to do the breathing through yours nose, I'm going to say that there isn't much training effect going on. More like a form of meditation where you get sweaty. As far as I know this is only done for recovery runs not training runs.

    Most of the crap out there about breathing and running falls into the same snake-oil pit as the bro-science you hear in the gym about lifting weights. Ventilation is never a limiting factor in running even though it might feel that way. Your lungs will fully saturate the blood if you just breathe however the heck you feel like breathing. At the very highest level of athletics (i.e. trying to make the difference between a 58:25 half marathon and 58:20) lots of things come into play including some creativity breathing. But none of them matter if your time is over an hour.

    For getting stronger, follow the blue book and stay away from gimmicks. There are probably many things (outside my area of knowledge) that matter when you are squatting over a grand. Start to worry about them when you find yourself loading seven plates on each side.

  9. #29
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    I think we may have scared off the OP. That's too bad because I'm sure the information available out there concerning strength training and hypertension is about as bad as it is regarding strength training and just about everything else.

    If somebody does come across this in the future, please keep in mind that *transient* increases on blood pressure (such as when you deadlift) make the heart *stronger* and build muscle. The walls of the ventricles thicken as a result of having to push blood through arteries that are compressed by the intra-abdominal pressure.

    The problem with hypertension is that it is *continuous* and the heart simply cannot get larger/stronger fast enough and you get maladaptation very similar to tendinosis.

    You need to talk to a doctor (and then probably get a second opinion) about training sequence. Running seems to lower hypertension in proportion to how fast you run. Running fast requires being somewhat strong (find me somebody who can string together seven minute miles but can't squat their bodyweight on a barbell).

    If you are completely sedentary, even running will make you stronger so it will have some effect on hypertension. But you will get very limited results by running slowly.

    You will get much greater hypertension results by using a more efficient way of getting stronger, namely squatting and deadlifting.

    Being able to run long distances requires more blood flow which is accomplished by expanding (but not thickening) the walls of the heart. Running faster or lifting more weights requires thickening of the ventricles which is going to be a much better remedy for any damage caused by hypertension.

    I am not a doctor and anybody who has hypertension should talk to one. But for most people, the best course of action will be to get it under control with medicine before there is damage to the heart, get strong and then, if desired, add in running. Same advice given to just about everybody here, I suppose.

    This stuff is hard because of the novice effect. Start running and you get stronger and make hypertension improvements. So you think that if a little running is good, a lot will be better. But it's not because the benefit came from the secondary effect of getting stronger. And when the running stops making you stronger, it stops improving hypertension.

    Also be very careful out there about correlation. Most fast runners also lift weights and studies that show that faster runners have various health improvements seem to ignore that those runners also almost all lift weights (even if not very well) and there is usually no attempt made to separate which part of the effect comes from which training modality.

  10. #30
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    starting strength coach development program
    Iím still here just donít have anything else to say.

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