Training Considerations for Law Enforcement | Tyler Perkins Training Considerations for Law Enforcement | Tyler Perkins

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    Default Training Considerations for Law Enforcement | Tyler Perkins

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    ​Due to the paramilitary nature of law enforcement, it is no surprise that the same training pitfalls the military continues to perpetuate have crept into these organizations as well. Starting at the bottom, from every criminal justice academy to local law enforcement and all the way up to specialized and “elite” agencies, the training emphasis is that of running, pushups, and situps.

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    I'll largely echo this with one difference: IF you do engage in foot pursuit, likely through an alley or trailer park strewn with mud, trash, glass and maybe needles, you'll have to accelerate your body weight plus 35+ pounds of duty equipment, weapon and body armor. All of the running in the world will not prepare you to excel at that work requirement. Your fleeing suspect will probably be in track pants, tennis shoes and little else.

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    One thing I will add - recovery is paramount, so periodization with your strength training may take a greater role in your training at this stage. You can't afford to be so sore that you can't function properly at your job - I had to rethink things during my rookie years when I was doing an intense squat cycle and had to get in a foot pursuit that night. The other guys on the shift got a good laugh out of it as the fat guy I was chasing was absolutely smoking me because my quads were so sore I couldn't sprint that well.

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    Having worked at kind of the periphery of law enforcement recently, I've got to say this is spot on. I've been working with older guys who used to work in law enforcement as well as younger guys trying to break into it. I also went to the local police academy for the fitness evaluation I had to get and saw a little of what they do there. The focus on endurance is ridiculous. Academy cadets are all made to jog at all times, even jogging in place when they're not moving. I laughed, because I knew any adaptation they got out of this activity was going to fucking evaporate after they get on the job and aren't made to jog like that anymore. It also amuses me because the focus on bodyweight exercises over just pure strength very obviously slants their recruitment toward smaller people. There are a TON of short cops I've seen around here, not a whole lot of big cops.

    I will also echo in particular the observation that stronger guys get into fewer confrontations in general. One guy I worked with was a short, old, retired school principal. Every time there was an incident that someone tried to use physical intimidation on one of our officers, it was ALWAYS directed toward him. Bullies are only bullies to people they are sure they can bully. Contrasting to that example, I was the big guy on the roster. I was polite and kind to everyone I had to deal with there, and the worst I got was the occasionally person muttering angrily under their breath as they walked away from me. But NEVER did someone actually try and initiate any sort of confrontation.

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    Starr told me that when he was stationed in Iceland back in the 1950s, he was told that to be hired as a policeman in the country you had to be 6'4". To apply. For this reason.

    Hurling is late...

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    I'm not sure it matters.. A large number of police officers don't do any type of training after they get the job anyway, judging by how out of shape many of them are. Not all though. A number of the city officers trained at the gym I went to and took their weight training seriously. The ones I knew were lifters who were cops, not because they were cops. One even competed in powerlifting and bodybuilding. I imagine their occupation gave them further incentive though. Even with all the toys they carry on their bat belts, looking the part might just save them the trouble of needing to use them, sometimes.

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    This is so true. As I worked about 20 years as a german police officer on the street and several years as an instructor I can fully agree. Strength is much more important than endurance. You often have to control aggressive people on the ground or carry someone away. After the rising terror in western europe the equipment became much more like in the military with ballistic body armour and heavier weapons. I never understood why the physical tests are so deep into running.

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    I remember during my short time in the military, it was the shorter guys who were the scarier ones. I had a sergeant in another platoon, couldn't be more than 5'4, but well over 200lbs of muscles. Dude was an absolute beast and could easily keep pace with most of the people there, even when weighted down with vests or rucks. Of course, still not great when compared to the genetic freaks who could run a ≤11:00min 2 mile after a good cig and dip session, he wasn't quite there. Then there was my sergeant major for the battalion. Also maybe 5'4", but skinny, maybe 150-160. Exact opposite aesthetically, most privates had more meat than him. However, he was still a triple tabbed (airborne, sapper, ranger) combat vet sergeant major and could smoke just about anyone in anything, even in his early-mid 40s. I guess all it took was the proper motivation and nothing could stop him. Even now, outside the military, I know two short high school kids, maybe 16-17, who can each sumo DL 405lbs. Yeah, its a sumo deadlift, but it is still 405lbs for someone not even 18 yet. Just some lessons I took to not fuck with short people, or people in general. No idea what any of them are capable of at a glance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuzTheBuz View Post
    I remember during my short time in the military, it was the shorter guys who were the scarier ones. I had a sergeant in another platoon, couldn't be more than 5'4, but well over 200lbs of muscles. Dude was an absolute beast and could easily keep pace with most of the people there, even when weighted down with vests or rucks. Of course, still not great when compared to the genetic freaks who could run a ≤11:00min 2 mile after a good cig and dip session, he wasn't quite there. Then there was my sergeant major for the battalion. Also maybe 5'4", but skinny, maybe 150-160. Exact opposite aesthetically, most privates had more meat than him. However, he was still a triple tabbed (airborne, sapper, ranger) combat vet sergeant major and could smoke just about anyone in anything, even in his early-mid 40s. I guess all it took was the proper motivation and nothing could stop him. Even now, outside the military, I know two short high school kids, maybe 16-17, who can each sumo DL 405lbs. Yeah, its a sumo deadlift, but it is still 405lbs for someone not even 18 yet. Just some lessons I took to not fuck with short people, or people in general. No idea what any of them are capable of at a glance.
    You're kind of missing the point. A guy who LOOKS like he will fuck you up is much more effective at deterring violence than a guy who doesn't, even if he happens to secretly be able to fuck you up despite his appearance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Starr told me that when he was stationed in Iceland back in the 1950s, he was told that to be hired as a policeman in the country you had to be 6'4". To apply. For this reason.

    Hurling is late...
    Nothing to add to the discussion that Rowe didn't already say. It may be that foot chases have changed these days, because back when all but a very few ended in under 400 yards or less. By then the fleeing suspect (generally drunk) either puked, tripped and fell, hit a low hanging clothes line, or gassed out. Although a couple of times I hung back a little and didn't close the gap over a longer distance to assure a gasping and more compliant suspect when applying handcuffs.

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