Restarting lifting after orthognathic surgery (or double jaw surgery) for sleep apnea Restarting lifting after orthognathic surgery (or double jaw surgery) for sleep apnea

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Thread: Restarting lifting after orthognathic surgery (or double jaw surgery) for sleep apnea

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    Default Restarting lifting after orthognathic surgery (or double jaw surgery) for sleep apnea

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    In 6 weeks I am going to have orthognathic/jaw surgery for sleep apnea (also know as maxillomandibular advancement, or MMA surgery)
    For now, I am just trying to gain as much muscular bodyweight as possible before surgery, based on this article: Losing Bodyfat or Gaining Muscle Mass | Mark Rippetoe

    I had some questions on lifting post operation that I am hoping someone from the forum that had this surgery or knows about the surgery could help answer.

    1. Compared to exercising, is there anything specific about strength training that could impact jaw surgery recovery that I should talk to my surgeon about me.
    2. Does lifting and using the valsalva maneuver cause more stress on your body compared to cardio that could raise your blood pressure or pulse, or make your recovering blood vessels breathe easier.
    3. Jaw clenching after surgery can cause recovery problems. Is this a common thing most people do when strength training?
    4. Is it fine to press after surgery before the jaw is fully healed in case you hit yourself in the face on the way up?
    5. Did you continue lifting heavy right up until surgery, or did you take, a couple days/weeks off to make sure it wouldn't hurt surgery recovery?
    6. Any other advice for restarting lifting and jaw surgery?

    Thanks for reading, I hope to bring any of information from this thread to my oral and maxillofacial surgeon to discuss a proper recovery plan.

  2. #2
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    I have absolutely no experience with this.

  3. #3
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    n10
    A two jaw advancement (usually around 1cm) is the most effective surgical treatment for sleep apnea. Your sleep is about to get much better!
    It's also going to change your appearance, especially your profile, so be ready for that.
    Recovery after surgery depends on many variables, such as your age and health, the surgeon, method of surgery (wired shut or not, etc).
    I would continue lifting as usual for the next several weeks, as well as eating as much as possible.
    There is no reason you cannot lift up until surgery day except the fact that your oral intake is going to decrease dramaticlly after surgery, which will make recovery from lifting difficult. Therefore I would probably stop lifting a couple days prior.
    It will take 4-6 weeks (usually) for the bone to heal but you don't have to stop lifting the whole time. I would definitely take 1 week totally off. Depending on how you are doing, you may be able to start some light lifting the second week or third week.
    The blood supply to the face/mouth/jaws is profuse and healing will be relatively rapid, and the jaws will be rigidly fixated with plates/screws (again, depending on method) so I wouldn't worry about trying to increase blood flow or knocking the bones loose.
    Bottom line, don't stress about missing workouts before surgery. After surgery, start slow. Once you are back at full speed your progress should surpass what it was prior to surgery due to your increased recovery from improved sleep.
    For more specific information I would need your age, health, weight, height, and name of surgeon (I may know him/her and have some insight into methods, etc)

  4. #4
    Ray Gillenwater's Avatar
    Ray Gillenwater is offline Administrator, Starting Strength Gyms
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    Yes, some people grit their teeth when they lift. Think "soft jaw" before you un-rack the bar.

    Also, there isn't much risk of hitting your jaw on the press. To keep the risk as low as possible, pretend you're holding a tennis ball between your neck and your chin - keep your chin tucked. Nail your timing too. It's hips AND THEN press. Not at the same time. When your hips are forward, your face is out of the way. If you're an experienced presser, I wouldn't worry. If you're an inexperienced presser, you may want to "leave your hips forward" before pressing the bar overhead. This reduces the risk of fucking up the timing and bouncing your face into the barbell. Probably nothing to worry about unless you're new to lifting and/or are particularly clumsy.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by n10 View Post
    In 6 weeks I am going to have orthognathic/jaw surgery for sleep apnea (also know as maxillomandibular advancement, or MMA surgery)
    For now, I am just trying to gain as much muscular bodyweight as possible before surgery, based on this article: Losing Bodyfat or Gaining Muscle Mass | Mark Rippetoe

    I had some questions on lifting post operation that I am hoping someone from the forum that had this surgery or knows about the surgery could help answer.

    1. Compared to exercising, is there anything specific about strength training that could impact jaw surgery recovery that I should talk to my surgeon about me.
    2. Does lifting and using the valsalva maneuver cause more stress on your body compared to cardio that could raise your blood pressure or pulse, or make your recovering blood vessels breathe easier.
    3. Jaw clenching after surgery can cause recovery problems. Is this a common thing most people do when strength training?
    4. Is it fine to press after surgery before the jaw is fully healed in case you hit yourself in the face on the way up?
    5. Did you continue lifting heavy right up until surgery, or did you take, a couple days/weeks off to make sure it wouldn't hurt surgery recovery?
    6. Any other advice for restarting lifting and jaw surgery?

    Thanks for reading, I hope to bring any of information from this thread to my oral and maxillofacial surgeon to discuss a proper recovery plan.
    Man, I wish I could get that. Get that action hero chin, ditch the overbite, and stop snoring, all in one procedure.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kansan View Post
    n10
    A two jaw advancement (usually around 1cm) is the most effective surgical treatment for sleep apnea. Your sleep is about to get much better!
    It's also going to change your appearance, especially your profile, so be ready for that.
    Recovery after surgery depends on many variables, such as your age and health, the surgeon, method of surgery (wired shut or not, etc).
    I would continue lifting as usual for the next several weeks, as well as eating as much as possible.
    There is no reason you cannot lift up until surgery day except the fact that your oral intake is going to decrease dramaticlly after surgery, which will make recovery from lifting difficult. Therefore I would probably stop lifting a couple days prior.
    It will take 4-6 weeks (usually) for the bone to heal but you don't have to stop lifting the whole time. I would definitely take 1 week totally off. Depending on how you are doing, you may be able to start some light lifting the second week or third week.
    The blood supply to the face/mouth/jaws is profuse and healing will be relatively rapid, and the jaws will be rigidly fixated with plates/screws (again, depending on method) so I wouldn't worry about trying to increase blood flow or knocking the bones loose.
    Bottom line, don't stress about missing workouts before surgery. After surgery, start slow. Once you are back at full speed your progress should surpass what it was prior to surgery due to your increased recovery from improved sleep.
    For more specific information I would need your age, health, weight, height, and name of surgeon (I may know him/her and have some insight into methods, etc)
    Age: 28, otherwise healthy besides sleep apnea.
    Height/Weight: 5' 10", 195 lbs, trying to get up to 200 before surgery.
    Surgeon: Dr. Neugarten of NYCOMS, won't be wired shut, will use rigid fixed titanium plates I think.

  7. #7
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    Commander
    Why can't you?

  8. #8
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    starting strength coach development program
    I think I met Dr Ruggerio once. Maybe he came to our residency to give a lecture? I don't know Neugarten, but I am sure they are using state-of-the-art technique, which means not being wired shut. Plates on maxilla, either plates or just screws on the mandible, either way is acceptable.
    Looks like you are in good hands and your quality of life is about to get much better.

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