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Thread: Bodyparts vs. Movement Patterns | Mark Rippetoe

  1. #1
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    Default Bodyparts vs. Movement Patterns | Mark Rippetoe

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    Strength is displayed in normal human movement patterns, and it must therefore be developed in normal human movement patterns, because the most efficient version of the movement pattern is an inherent part of the strength being displayed. Training the movement pattern itself is the only way to ensure that all the components of the kinetic chain of the movement are responding to the stress of the load in the way they actually function within the movement.

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  2. #2
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    unless you are a physical idiot you cannot fall down doing a dumbbell row
    Hey, I resemble that remark...

    ...though I do prefer "Motor Moron", a term I freely admit to learning from the same author. The alliteration makes it sound like a Stan Lee character.

  3. #3
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    > Now, if you are a contest bodybuilder in the intermediate/advanced levels of training, you probably need to isolate your quads, for separation, muscularity, and other bodybuilding-type reasons.

    Does "muscularity" have a bodybuilding-specific definition or meaning here? Or is it still just referring to larger size?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexjgustafson View Post
    > Now, if you are a contest bodybuilder in the intermediate/advanced levels of training, you probably need to isolate your quads, for separation, muscularity, and other bodybuilding-type reasons.

    Does "muscularity" have a bodybuilding-specific definition or meaning here? Or is it still just referring to larger size?
    It's a physique-er term that means the size of the muscle bellies when compared to nearby muscles.

  5. #5
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    Aug 2022
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    Mark
    You have said this for years and still need to say it again and again. I believe until your last breath you will tell the truth. Get strong. Don't
    waste your time doing stupid shit in the gym that will not get you strong and is a waste of time, energy, and recovery.

    You can buy Mark's books or better yet pay one of his certified coaches to learn the proper form for the prescribed exercises and the precise set/rep
    loading scheme. You keep hammering it home because the fitness industry is a fraud for the most part. Finding someone knowledgeable
    is like looking for a needle in a haystack. You're the needle. Almost everyone else is part of the haystack.

    Thanks for continuing to educate a world of people that have been brainwashed when you could be doing something for fun like
    watching part of a good movie on your forum.

    Keep your head down
    In my not too humble opinion, you're too good and care too much for a world like this but you are a strong independent thinker
    who makes his own decisions.

  6. #6
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    "But it is easier, and it's more fun."

    A few weeks ago, I condescended to follow a friend's machine-based training regiment for a day. As we worked our delts on the lateral raise machine, it struck me why it's so commonplace to hear people, who we might otherwise dismiss as lazy, say that exercising is unbearably boring. Sitting there, counting the amount of times I flapped my wings, was unbearably boring. Conversely, getting under the bar to see if I might conquer my squat PR is anything but boring.

    A trenchant and succinct article.

  7. #7
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    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by Jortinbras View Post
    As we worked our delts on the lateral raise machine, it struck me why it's so commonplace to hear people, who we might otherwise dismiss as lazy, say that exercising is unbearably boring. Sitting there, counting the amount of times I flapped my wings, was unbearably boring. Conversely, getting under the bar to see if I might conquer my squat PR is anything but boring.
    My only exposure to any type of "strength training" had been these silly machines. In my high school in Europe they had a basement with an assortment of machines and nothing else. At a previous employer we also got access to a small-scale gym as a perk, but I didn't manage to go for long due to excessive boredom. Because of that, all through my twenties and thirties I continued to believe that "doing fitness" is boring as hell.

    It makes sense though: working those machines doesn't require any type of skill, neither on the part of the "coach"/trainer who explains it nor on the part of the exerciser who uses them. Training with barbells on the other hand is very challenging and technical (if you want to do it right). In fact, that was the first thing I've heard from people I've coached: "Wow, this is so technical!"

    So while bodypart-specific training might not be more "fun", it's certainly much easier: just sit in the chair, push or pull the handle and count your reps. Though I'm sure there are also lots of people who confuse easy for fun because they can have other kinds of fun while doing it, like ogling the good-looking people around them, joking around with their buddy or watch some sort of screen. With that attitude, if an exercise is actually hard, it's not fun.

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