starting strength gym
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: The Ride: Bull Riders Donít Want to Get Too Bulky

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2023
    Location
    Pembroke & Toronto (Ontario, Canada)
    Posts
    9

    Default The Ride: Bull Riders Donít Want to Get Too Bulky

    • starting strength seminar jume 2024
    • starting strength seminar august 2024
    • starting strength seminar october 2024
    I joined a friend who was watching a show called ďThe RideĒ last night on Amazon Prime. Itís sort of a dramatized documentary that follows a bull riding team through life, training and competing.

    All Iím thinking about throughout this is ďman, these guys must really have to put on some muscle in order to survive thisĒ. I say that as someone whoís fallen off a horse more than a few times, even had the horse fall on me. The ground is always way harder than it looks on the way down. It almost always sucks. The horse is never trying to kill me though.

    I havenít fallen since doing my NLP and gaining a bunch of healthy weight (~60 lbs), but I imagine my sturdiness would be much better now, just as it would be for a football player who gained size

    At first I assumed they had some mass but itís hard to tell under the chaps and protective gear. Then one gets hurt and you could see the guy wasnít that big but not skinny either. Maybe heís still got a good squat though, right? I donít want him to take his pants off, Iíll just give home the benefit of the doubt.

    Well about half way through episode (s1e6, ~30min) these guys are in a gym with their trainer doing all sorts of balance and agility drills. Balancing their butts on these bosu ball things, pitter-pattering their feet along a pattern on the floor, catching sticks out of the air that the trainer drops. They do this as a team, lining up for each to get their turn. Not a barbell was seen. The trainer then in an aside explains to the interviewer that he doesnít want his athletes to get too bulky so this is what they stick to! I mean I could understand how wanting to avoid the body distribution of someone who never trains legs would be bad in a sport where a lower centre of mass is an advantage but COME ON! Avoid strength training altogether seems irresponsible. Also, itís a failure to recognize that the ďbulkĒ would still have to come from eating in a surplus in addition to the training.

    Some of these guys are getting thrown and knocked out, then getting back on within a week. I imagine the rates of CTE in this group are not very good, which makes this even more irresponsible.

    Just looking to get othersí thoughts on this. Can you believe what this trainer is saying? That people are paying him for his advice? Have you seen this series? Are there better trainers on other teams, in other episodes? Have any of you participated in this sort of thing or other rodeo events?


    TLDR: the trainer for the PBR bull riding team does not do strength training to prevent the athletes from getting ďtoo bulkyĒ.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    53,697

    Default

    Post the link to the show.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2023
    Location
    Pembroke & Toronto (Ontario, Canada)
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Here’s the show: Amazon.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    53,697

    Default

    It's not surprising to see this kind of shit at the high levels of any sport now. The malpractice of S&C has become the norm, and lots of athletic potential is being wasted.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    394

    Default

    Extra weight on the bull would seem a good idea, no?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    53,697

    Default

    No, momentum builds on the rider as the bull spins. But extra strength to pull down into the rig seems like a pretty good idea. But balance and agility seems like a prereq. for being a rough stock athlete. Functional Training charlatans are currently popular, and will remain so until the PRCA people wake the fuck up.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2021
    Posts
    595

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    No, momentum builds on the rider as the bull spins. But extra strength to pull down into the rig seems like a pretty good idea. But balance and agility seems like a prereq. for being a rough stock athlete. Functional Training charlatans are currently popular, and will remain so until the PRCA people wake the fuck up.
    I'm not familiar with this (or really any) sport, but might it help to get one or two big, strong, and successful athletes (who can test negative for PEDs, of course) to put the lie to the functional silliness? I'm wondering if it would be more possible in a smaller sport for a few like that to stand out than in the NBA/NFL/whatever.

    (Not optimistic, though...)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    669

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    No, momentum builds on the rider as the bull spins. But extra strength to pull down into the rig seems like a pretty good idea. But balance and agility seems like a prereq. for being a rough stock athlete. Functional Training charlatans are currently popular, and will remain so until the PRCA people wake the fuck up.
    Roughstock has been almost exlusively the domain of twinks for a lot longer than they've been doing functional training, though.

    Can't disagree with the idea of practicing balance and agility, but at the same time, even a mediocre rider is going to be pretty gifted in that area to begin with or he won't even be climbing in the chute. The best ones were always guys who were strong already. But all of them would benefit from being stronger. Especially in the grip and the hips/lower torso. If only there was some way to train that.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2023
    Location
    Pembroke & Toronto (Ontario, Canada)
    Posts
    9

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    I do wonder what the decay period is for something like balance and agility is. Also do those athletic attributes transfer well from how they are trained to the actual sport? I remember reading about them in my kinesiology textbooks and felt a little skeptical at the time, though I'm fine to be wrong about that. Regardless, just like the vertical jump, I'm sure the ceiling for training agility/balance is not far from where you start off.


    >Roughstock has been almost exlusively the domain of twinks

    I'm starting to see that now. The defence of that seems to be that just like with jockeys, its actually what you want in the sport. Or is it that if you look like you could play football, you'd be playing football? I suppose to know this for sure there would have to be a highly successful counterexample in the sport.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •