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Thread: TRT for young male

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Why does he need to go back to the GP? Does he have Chicken Pox?
    Almost !, he has bad eczema so goes back from time to time when he needs script for ointment when it flares up, he eats clean, not sure what causes it

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panda View Post
    The second in person visit more recent found no underlying condition, just social awkwardness and to engage more, heís an introvert.
    It's a lot to unpack, Panda. A good therapist might be able to help riddle out some of the main causes. Does your son give you more detail about what is bothering him? Sometimes a trusted stranger is easier to talk to than a family member, because the professional disappears when therapy ends.

    If he missed a few steps socially, he might be feeling left out and isolated. That's hard, but 23 is young and he can get back in the game.

    There's a PsyD on YouTube named Orion Taraban. Understands men's issues very well and might be worth you or your son talking to him for advice, but if your son has a mental illness, he needs a specialist in that area.

    Hopefully he's avoiding some of the dark parts of of the internet, like the "black pill" stuff. A lot of very bad content out there that breeds contempt, hopelessness and self-hatred. Not a productive place to wallow.

    Lastly, I don't mean to get too personal, but would I be wrong to infer that his social issues extend to talking to women (assuming he's straight)? Not that he'd necessarily be comfortable talking to his father about this anyway.

  3. #13
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    Long post, sorry in advance.

    I went on TRT when I was 20, and ended up getting off of it when I was 22. It was an incredibly stressful period in my life (near the beginning of COVID) and I avoided seeking mental health services for some reason or another (pride, mostly).

    Before getting on TRT I was suicidal for years. It began in high school with thoughts, progressed into various forms of self harm, and eventually attempts. I got on TRT expecting to magically feel better, and while I did feel better in the expected ways (improved focus, sex drive, energy, etc.), it didn't make the thoughts go away. I began training with barbells when I was 17 and took no time off because of my depression or SI, only if I was sick or on an airplane. Just like your son, four days per week, only feeling like a human while I had a bar in my hands or on my back.

    I wish I could say that training and TRT was the solution, but I want to make it crystal clear that in my experience it was not. I don't intend to sound like an expert in the field, but it wasn't until I got admitted for a week in the psych ward and quit drinking that things really began to improve in a substantial amount.

    You love your son, and he loves you. He has reason enough to still be here, and that's a victory in it's own right. Without knowing you or him personally, I'm still confident in that.

    I'm not going to pretend to have a magic solution. I don't believe for a second that anyone does. But after going through the experiences that I have being in the same age bracket, I can personally attest that things are getting more and more confusing these days. Things that have helped though, are:

    - Quitting drinking. I don't know if he drinks or not, but alcohol was a major contributor to some of my worst spirals. Even if he doesn't quit, be sure that he doesn't keep bottles in his room or anywhere that is other than the kitchen.

    - Going for walks. Getting outside and listening to some music or a podcast has been one of the best things I've found. Taking time to get out and get some fresh air, not being on the internet more than to pick a song or episode, and moving a bit have all served as an excellent space to reflect.

    - Being intentional with your check-ins. Someone in his position may not give a shit about being asked "how are you today?". However, asking how he is doing physically, mentally, and emotionally, may force him to stop and really identify where some of his feelings are. This is something that takes practice, but can be incredibly revealing once it's understood. Once he starts talking, you do nothing but listen and only ask for clarifiers unless it is immediately life threatening, or he is finished speaking.

    - Accepting that some days will be better than others, and coming to peace with that. Some days are just better than others, but with some additional habit building and identifying of things that bring him joy or peace, he will find alternate ways to pull himself out. Very similar to training, we know what must be done and do it regardless of how we feel that day. I trained the day I tried to end everything, and when I woke up the next afternoon, trained before admitting myself to the ER. That's not to sound macho, but it really felt like the only thing I had left at that moment and didn't want to go out without it.

    At the end of all of this, Panda, I don't believe his situation is something that can be minimized to low testosterone. Is that a contributing factor? Potentially, I'm not in a place to say it's not. But is all of this hinging on his testosterone level? No. Since getting off of TRT I haven't gone back once to get checked, and minus a hint of sciatica to spice things up, was getting bigger and stronger again (even more than when I was on TRT). My physical functions are all working properly aside from that, and I feel better mentally and emotionally with the introduction of some practice talking about my feelings.

    If he is not interested in talking to you directly, he may be interested in writing and reflecting on his own as a place to start. I have used and had friends use Therapy Notebooks. Their website will tell you more about what they have to offer better than I can, but they're another useful tool that can be sat down with before, during, or after and episode. Their website can be found by clicking here. I'm not affiliated with them at all, but understand that talking can be hard.

    You're doing a very honorable thing by asking for input, and I'm personally glad to see that you care about your son so far as to admit that advice could be used. That in itself can be hard to do, and I really believe you are making steps in the right direction that will help him find the relief and support that he needs. Encourage him to keep training, let him really be heard by you, and start there.

  4. #14
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    Has his thyroid hormones been checked? That could be another contributor to his depression. One thing to add is he should consider joining a sport jiu jitsu gym, not an mma gym but purely jiu jitsu. Bjj gyms usually attract people who are a little on the outside of societies norm and who are usually very nice and personable. It might give him a place of belonging. Also itís a great way to occupy oneís mind. I constantly think about situations from rolling or techniques as weird as that may sound. Honestly bjj has done more positive for my mental health than anything else, and Iím sure there are other guys on this form who feel the same. I know every situation is different, and this advice is coming on top of not instead of any trt type treatments.

  5. #15
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    Maybe he's an autist? I mean it's a lot of guesswork and I'd say only he can really know why he feels that way. But I think I was similar at that age and I got diagnosed a lot after that. I did mostly grow out of it after getting some routine and purpose re jobs, family etc.

    But I'm probably still depressed and I live on the better side of Oz. I'm just wired a specific way. Was a blessing during COVID though.

    How easy was it to get test gel here though? I want to get something but I'm not sure the common docs will oblige.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BareSteel View Post
    It's a lot to unpack,
    Really appreciate the comments, think youíre spot on, Iíll check out Orion, thanks for the tip.

    Quote Originally Posted by amurrow View Post
    Long post, sorry in advance.
    Thank you so much for sharing, that really helps. He doesnít drink at all or smoke, heís almost too clean. Iím not hanging my hat on just TRT, I do think itís more than that. Iíd still like him to try it just to see what happens. He needs to think about it for a while.

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnsonville View Post
    Has his thyroid hormones been checked? That could be another contributor to his depression. One thing to add is he should consider joining a sport jiu jitsu gym,
    No never checked that, will look into it thankyou. He does watch MMA so maybe bjj might be something to look at.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mizuchi23 View Post
    Maybe he's an autist? I mean it's a lot of guesswork and I'd say only he can really know why he feels that way. But I think I was similar at that age and I got diagnosed a lot after that. I did mostly grow out of it after getting some routine and purpose re jobs, family etc.
    Totally agree about routine, we try hard to make sure heís occupied, he always gets worse if he has time on his hands, ie between jobs etc.The test gel Iíve got, yes, was not source thru authorized channelsÖ

  7. #17
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    Some extra things to consider.

    I was more depressed living with my parents than not. I'm not saying boot him out if he does. Just independence provides a lot of stuff that needs doing.

    If he is unfortunate enough to be like me then the biggest issue I have is sensory stimulus and social interaction. In other words, I am easily overloaded by my environment and I don't jive well with others. I learnt how to behave but it requires a lot of energy to do so, so I am often burnt out. He could have noise or light sensitivity that you could cheaply experiment with by tinted glasses and various earbuds or noise cancelling headphones. He could not even be aware of these things.

    But man, I did survive and I had no diagnosis and no real family support and now I am married mostly happily with a 4 year old girl born on my birthday who is amazing and a 9 month old boy who is a lot of fun. I'm still too thin and weak for on here though.

    I'm sure he can survive too. After all, he's got someone going in to bat with him.

  8. #18
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    So we still have poor clinical information about your child.

    Maybe it is just his personality

    Make sure of keep him doing his workouts, thatīs good for his endorphines.

  9. #19
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    Is he in love and doesnít know what to do about that? The depression that comes from that if youíre a young man can be crippling. Trust me.

  10. #20
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    Hi Panda, your thread popped into my head and I was just wondering if you made any progress with your son.

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