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Thread: GOMAD doesn't work for me

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Is it your contention that the Ayurvedics invented lactose-free milk?
    No I am just glad to be living in a time where both lactofree milk and Ayurveda exist.

  2. #22
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    Again for clarity, my understanding is that Fairlife is ultrafiltered, not lactase treated. It's a mechanical process that just removes the lactose vs. breaking it down into galactose and glucose, hence its lower carb count, while effectively raising the density of the protein.

  3. #23
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    Ultrafiltered milk is nutritionally superior to milk for basically everyone. Ultrafiltration is less complicated than the reverse osmosis under home faucets. The innovation in these products is not really the processing itself, but finding industrial applications for the byproducts (permeate full of lactose).

    Quote Originally Posted by mathgainer View Post
    I am so glad to be living in a time where lactofree milk is available; where the wisdom of Ayurveda lives on.
    If you recall, this thread is about how you don't like milk.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maybach View Post
    Is your contention that lactase has some unknown mechanism of action that degrades the protein? Because that is the sole extra processing step over normal milk. Which sure, comes from factory farms, but has not failed to produce big strong people for decades. It seems you're appealing to amorphous food hygiene neuroses that are about as credible as Ayurvedic voodoo. I wouldn't want my food to come from with high karmic debt, I suppose, but I don't know that that's going to affect my lifting.
    What you have said is incorrect.
    Please look into the actual production methods for lactose-free milk; there are 3 common methods.

    Did you not read my post?
    In and of itself, the "innocuous" addition of synthetic lactase results in large numbers of reported side effects.

    If your Ayurvedic spirits want you to eat margarine and to drink fake milk, go ahead.
    Just don't expect me to jump on your all-inclusive, religious band wagon or to lavish you with praise when the product is not what it is claimed to be.
    ________________

    As an aside for anybody who is interested in this topic, it has been known for a long time that even pasteurized milk has less nutritional value that unpasteurized milk.https://www.cambridge.org/core/servi...on_in_rats.pdf
    A tale of two calves — one calf was fed on raw milk, the other on pasteurized | The Bovine

    I shouldn't have to explain this, but I know I will get slack-jawed, mouth-gaping, reddit-type responses if I do not:

    Do these studies/results mean pasteurized milk is toxic?
    No, it probably means unpasteurized milk has all of the nutrients necessary to produce a healthy rat or cow, while pasteurized milk does not.
    For the simple-minded; As long as you have access to vitamins and a well-rounded diet in addition to milk, you will should still be fine consuming pasteurized milk.

    One more interesting fact; Lord Rothschild (Yes, from the family primarily know for war-profiteering and financial fraud, including financially backing George Soros in his successful attempt at "breaking the Bank of England") addressed British Parliament only two times:
    -Once to lobby for Zionism
    -And once in 1940 to lobby for the prohibition of the sale of raw milk.
    political history - What about dairy pasteurisation might have made the issue so important to Lord Rothschild? - History Stack Exchange

    There have been heavily-financed efforts to ban or restrict raw milk and to promote lactose-free fake milks for decades.
    Recently, there has been an increase in efforts both to prosecute raw milk producers (Amish prosecutions) and to expand the fake milk industry.

    The above are simply indisputable facts.

    A related, but unproven hypothesis that has been gaining traction lately:
    In the event of the rise of a zoonotic contagion (bird flu or covid, for example) that also affects bovines, raw milk from cows would likely contain antibodies to the contagion or a naturally attenuated form of the virus, that would confer a level of protection to consumers of raw milk and limit the severity/spread of any potential future pandemic.

  5. #25
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    I also have to dispute the claim that the "ultrafiltered" milk is nutritionally superior in any way; that claim is complete marketing bullshit, as is the deceptive term of "ultrafiltered".

    Having the components of an ultrapasteurized, homogenized milk mechanically separated, then selectively recombined results in a new product that is not milk with or without the addition of lactase.
    If it were in any way advantageous to alter the nutrient profile of milk by selectively concentrating certain proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals or other components of milk, we would see something like this occurring somewhere in nature.
    However, it does not occur.

    If they were honestly marketing the Fairlife product, they would call it "recombined milk" or "restructured milk" or "milk extract concentrate".

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shiva Kaul View Post
    Ultrafiltered milk is nutritionally superior to milk for basically everyone. Ultrafiltration is less complicated than the reverse osmosis under home faucets. The innovation in these products is not really the processing itself, but finding industrial applications for the byproducts (permeate full of lactose).



    If you recall, this thread is about how you don't like milk.
    Milk is good, just not in the quantities I was consuming at first. I am slowly working my way up to 1 gallon again and have had no side effects so far.

    Just to clarify I am consuming Arla lactofree whole milk, not fairlife. (I live in the UK.)

  7. #27
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    I don't know that Fairlife is recombined. Looking at the ingredients list, it looks like they filter out most of the lactose, and don't recombine anything. Turns out they do add lactase, presumably to get any unfiltered lactose, and they add vitamin A palmitate and vitamin D, which I think most dairies do with regular pasteurized and homogenized milk. Maybe they recombine fats for the different levels? (I have the skim version in front of me.) I get your argument - it's not milk straight from the cow.

    But to say this:

    Quote Originally Posted by Yngvi View Post
    If it were in any way advantageous to alter the nutrient profile of milk by selectively concentrating certain proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals or other components of milk, we would see something like this occurring somewhere in nature.
    However, it does not occur.
    I mean...really? How about these?

    If it were in any way advantageous to induce strength adaptations by incrementally loading barbells on compound movements, we would see something like this occurring somewhere in nature...

    If it were in any way advantageous to alter nutrient consumption by complexly combining and chemically changing the composition of foodstuffs with heat, we would see something like this occurring somewhere in nature...

    If it were in any way advantageous to accumulate long term knowledge by storing data via representational marks on paper and other enduring media, we would see something like this occurring somewhere in nature...

    Look, I'm not gunning for you here, Yngvi. I just think you're stretching with that particular line of reasoning is all.

  8. #28
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    Fairlife is, in fact, recombined: after the ultrafiltration cleaves retentate from permeate, the permeate is filtered further to isolate whey salts, which are added back to the original retentate. This is why Fairlife tastes as good as, or frankly better than, milk. Yet is nutritionally superior for basically everyone.

  9. #29
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    I spoke to an old dairy farmer who says non homogenized milk can be digested by people who are lactose intolerant. Apparently the larger globules (sic) are not digested until they are past the stomach, thereby preventing you from getting sick. Anybody else heard of this or tried it? I think my 4 yr old is lactose intolerant so we might try it out.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by heinz83 View Post
    I spoke to an old dairy farmer who says non homogenized milk can be digested by people who are lactose intolerant. Apparently the larger globules (sic) are not digested until they are past the stomach, thereby preventing you from getting sick. Anybody else heard of this or tried it? I think my 4 yr old is lactose intolerant so we might try it out.
    Keep a bucket handy.

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