Geezer's Long March Toward the Elite Sneaking Up On the Finish Line Geezer's Long March Toward the Elite Sneaking Up On the Finish Line - Page 43

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  1. #421
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    • texas seminar date
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    Mark, this is just one of numerous reasons I don't miss training in commercial gyms. One instance that comes to mind for me was when I was waiting(much too patiently) for a young guy to finish on a leg extension machine. Between his sets, he wouldn't budge, just sat there for probably 6 to 8 minutes. A half hour later, when I had moved on, he was still there. Another time I was doing squats in a YMCA with about 300 lbs. A newbie I hadn't seen before came up to me following my set, and said "You're going to hurt yourself squatting like that." He told me to keep my back upright. At the time, I had been squatting, very successfully, for over thirty years. Needless to say, I let his advice slide. One last thing Mark, could you explain how you do your claw grip. I've always been into grip work, and have a full set of grippers going up to 350 lbs resistance. If you've detailed the technique in the past, I apologize for missing it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark E. Hurling View Post
    An uncharacteristic event occurred at Gold's this morning. They have a stretching station there kind of like monkey bars that I use. There was a sweatshirt rolled up on the platform inside but no one apparently around using the station, so I started in. I finished up and another regular who uses that station was using some chin-up bars to do his stretching. I know he uses this same station so call over to him I was done with it. He thanks me as he comes over and asks about the sweatshirt. I said "I dunno, maybe we should sniff it to see who might have laying down a territorial marker." A few seconds later a shaven headed 6'3" guy about 240 stalks over and ostentatiously picks up the sweatshirt giving the full glare. There are a few ways to respond to that, but backing down by looking away is not in my DNA. So I return the direct eye contact with a half step back on my right foot. He swaggers off to put away the sweatshirt. I swear, primate dominance rituals are a trip. Just like in a band of chimps or gorillas. I guess that doesn't speak to highly of this old silverback for letting himself get drawn like that but . . . This was the same guy who had put is towel down on the bench press station earlier in my session and ignored the thing for the next 20 minutes even though he never benched.

  2. #422
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    Thanks JM3.

    The claw grip: http://ironmind-store.com/Claw-Curl1...ductinfo/1378/

    It's used for the open hand grip. Lot's of rock climbers use these to improve their handhold grip on rock faces. You fit the fingers into the loops and attach the claw curl to a cable stack and draw your fingers in toward your palms. You can also attach some plates to the end but I've always found it easier to use a cable stack.

    In my case, I use it as an adjunct to my jujitsu training. Since our style and dojo are focused on self defense and not competition with rules and no-touch areas or techniques I find it useful. We have two kinds of grip based attacks one is called a shark bite which is really no more than a very hard and forceful pinch to sensitive areas on the body where there is loose skin and nerve centers. Under or inside the arms, along the torso or love handles, or inside the thighs right next to where the boys live and hang around. Hurts like getting hit with a cattle prod. The other is called a horse bite using all four fingers to grab larger segments of the body even more forcefully. Like the boys and crushing them along with those other areas I described. Puts a whole new major disincentive to going to the ground in a fight huh?

  3. #423
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    Great job on the squat, Knurling! Keep 'em coming.

  4. #424
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    Puts a whole new major disincentive to going to the ground in a fight huh?
    As if we needed any more. The more time I spend studying groundfighting (until recently a long-neglected component of my martial arts education), the more I realize I don't want to spend any time on the ground in a fight, which motivates me to spend more time studying groundfighting. It's a vicious circle.

    Two weeks ago, we were practicing side headlock escapes, and my opponent, who was much bigger and more experienced than I, had me pretty much nailed down. From the corner of my eye, I could see the instructor standing over me. "You're doing the technique right, Sully, but it's not working. He's too strong and too smart. You don't know another escape. Now what?"

    "I bite off his nipple?"

    "That's what I would do."

  5. #425
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    Once again thanks to all for the kudos on the squat, you too Freak.

    I did a fit test today and got a VO2 max of 38.7. Still in the excellent category for 60 year old geezers, so God is good. I then did some facepulls with 90 lbs. for 3 sets of 15. I got this from asking a question of Jamie on his log and got a bunch of great feedback from Jay Ashman and others on the usefulness of this for shoulder stability and balance. Reverse engineering my current right delt discomfort, the problem manifested itself after starting bench presses and then a max overhead press of of 215. Then I did a change up of my program that dropped hammer rows for pull-ups and DB push presses. I now think maybe my frontal delts strength got too far out in front of my rear delt and upper back strength. For some years prior to coming here I followed a program organization template of a vertical push, balanced by a horizontal push, a vertical pull, balanced by a horizontal pull, then a lower body exercise. Rip doesn't seem quite so doctrinaire about the planes of movement template and so I kind of started paying no attention to it. We'll see if the face pulls help. The right delt feels a little better so far, but that rascal has fooled me before.

    So Sully, was the side headlock done on the ground or standing. I've got a couple of quick and effective escapes we teach our blue belt 1st degrees if it's standing. If it's on the ground, I migh thave to think for a while but I'm pretty sure the standing techniques can adapt to it. How about a little more detail?

  6. #426
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    This was a ground technique, headlock from the side. (Headlock in the mount is actually a fairly easy escape for me.) There are two Krav variants of headlock from the side on the ground; one with the attacker's weight back, one with weight forward. Obviously, he's in front of you on the floor, on his side, and your head is locked under his lower shoulder. If his weight is forward (away from you), you hook his top leg with your top leg, drive the hips forward explosively (power cleans!) to extend him into a weak position and minimize space, then drive your upper arm into the back of his neck to drive his face into the floor. You should end up on his dead side, over his back, with him prone, elbows and knees tight against his torso, weight solidly on him through your hips. It's your basic side mount, really, except he's prone. We finish with knee strikes, elbows, etc. I've used this one several times with some of the bigger guys in the class (who give no quarter, btw), and it's working well for me.

    With attacker's weight back (on you), there's a violent pull on his top shoulder to try and pull him over into a reversal. This puts you in a good position for a cross face and an escape. This is the one that's giving me fits. With a big guy it's tough to pull him over, and I can only make it work about half the time. OTOH, I always seem to end up within biting range of a titty, so on the street there's that. (We, um, don't bite nipples on the practice floor, even if our training partner is of the opposite sex and very attractive. It's frowned on.)

    The standing headlocks I've learned so far come in two flavors: forward and reverse (guillotine). The forward counter involves a 45 deg lunge to the live side, a very nasty strike to the groin, and simultaneous pressure across the philtrum to drive his head back into cervical extension, opening him up to all sorts of counterstrikes. I find it effective, although it has to be executed smartly and quickly to work. The guillotine hold is a new one for me, and involves an explosive pluck at the attacker's hands and turning the head into his chest to relieve the choke. Then drive the inner shoulder into his torso and up, to create space and rotate out. Knees, groin kicks, punches, etc.

    Krav emphasizes simplicity. It's street fu for dummies. Very different from the Tang Soo I've been doing for 30 years. Less beautiful, more practical.
    Last edited by Jonathon Sullivan; 05-18-2011 at 12:12 PM. Reason: spelling

  7. #427
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    The ground technique you describe sounds a lot like what we and judo call a scarf hold. Your escapes are pretty similar too. One of the objectives in such a situation is to create space between you and the guy holding you. Hooking an arm around or under a leg with the hand reaching up to grab the boys will at least create some space or the desire to get some space away from you on the part of the attacker. Even a hard grip of the hamstring, outer buttock, or inner thigh will too, but you have to grab and grip like you're trying to tear the skin right off and be ready to exploit the opening space immediately. Snaking the hand up around to the trachea, eyes, or ears will do this on the upper body pretty well too. This all presumes I am envisioning the hold and entry correctly, and I could be dead-ass wrong on that score. So if I'm full of it, I'll regroup and re-think.

    Your standing escapes are very similar to what we do. I've used the term philtrum at the dojo and everyone looks at me like I was nuts. I keep trying to convince them it's a real word used to describe that part of the body.

  8. #428
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    This all presumes I am envisioning the hold and entry correctly, and I could be dead-ass wrong on that score.
    Not at all, sounds like we're on the same page, except you have vastly more experience at this sort of thing than I. I spent a lot of time learning pretty Korean kicks and forms and stand-up sparring; grappling not so much. So I'm in remedial learning right now. Groundfighting has highlighted deficiencies in my strength and power, and has made my recent gains equally apparent--I think SS is already paying dividends on the training floor for me. Starting over in Krav as a beginner about three years ago was the best thing ever for my martial arts practice, forcing me to look at fighting in an entirely new way. It's made my classical practice better, too. "Emptying the cup," as Bruce would have said.

    Your standing escapes are very similar to what we do.
    Very interesting, but not surprising, I guess. What works, works. What doesn't...ends up in an action movie.

  9. #429
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    The ability to generate power from the lower body and hip drive in overcoming a ground attack and getting back up to stomp a mudhole in the attacker's proned out ass can be overlooked. Likewise with the "core" (God am I tired of that term) and being able to twist, arch, and turn with power and authority. I can't think of any technique on the ground that is an effective escape or attack that doesn't begin with a solid foot plant and a drive that initiates in the heels, up the femurs, through the pelvis, and then maybe elsewhere for the final portions. Squats and deadlifts fit that power and strength developmental bill quite nicely. Probably power cleans too, but I'm gonna need some hands on coaching to overcome some teen hardwiring from tossing hay bales to get my form down properly.

  10. #430
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    starting strength coach development program
    SO how is the shoulder coming along? Mine gave out on me during Jerks. Nothing too bad, just annoying.

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