Geezer training and Iron induced Musings Geezer training and Iron induced Musings

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Thread: Geezer training and Iron induced Musings

  1. #1
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    Default Geezer training and Iron induced Musings

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    I have been working the Starting Strength approach for about two years. Previously I had not had any serious weightlifting since high school, 40 plus years ago. Now, I am doing a geezer modified linear progression (LP), twice a week and adding weight after I complete three successful sets of five.

    I don’t train with headphones so the rest periods between sets are an enjoyable “me time”, ergo the “iron musings”. I lift at a local commercial gym, which is sometimes interesting. The gym has one slightly used squat rack and a bunch of heavily used Hammer Strength machines. I also work in an office so I sit on my butt most of the day, so the gym is an essential survival tool.

    I am approximately 61 years old, 230, and 5ft -10in. current lifts for sets of five are
    Squat 315 (weight listed in pounds); Deadlift -330; Bench 180; Press 150; Power Clean 150.

    I am recovering from a few old guy injuries. I used Bill Starr rehab and now I am using the LP to recover.
    Jan 30 - squat 310, bench 175 dead lift 320,
    I reset my deadlift to correct my form along the lines of what Kong told Rusty Whaits. The weight went up easy. Thanks to Kong’s hint about the knees being under the chest. I wonder about the correct way to reset a deadlift between sets, do you hold on to the bar or let go and stand up and do a complete reset.

  2. #2
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    Always good to see a fellow geezer's log. I have really only tried to reset once on deadlifts and it was just a few days ago because of the discomfort of a new belt that I levered on too tight. I'm not sure there is a correct versus incorrect way to do this. But in my case I let go, stood up to catch my breath from the belt cutting into me, realigned my feet under the bar to assure a midfoot placement, and then bent my knees and re-gripped the bar. Since I was using a mixed grip, supinated (left) hand first and pronated (right) hand next.

    In my opinion, the really critical thing is getting the foot placement and alignment correct.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the comments, Mark. Was the foot placement the change you made to your lifts to get to 405? I found my belt, which I use for Squats, interfered with the deadlift so I don't deadlift with a belt. But come to think of it, I changed my form so I should try using a belt for deadlifts.

  4. #4
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    Foot placement was a big part of it, definitely. For me that made much of the rest click into place. But learning to get the head, neck, and gaze orientation was important too. Once those elements were in place, getting the back angle and such came together pretty easily for me.

  5. #5
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    Today, squar 315, press 150 and Power Clean 150. Barbell curls, yes I had to do them, 90. Good day, knee good, shoulder good. I focused more on form and it seemed to work. With so many people at the gym using small weight or bodyweight movements I thouoght it was a shame more people don't know about Barbell Medicine. I had a cup of coffee before the workout, it seemed to help. I kept a focus on form. I found the form tips in the Book to reduce the moment arm of the weight it very useful. I was impressed how much easier the press is if you don't let it get too far in front of the shoulders.
    Last edited by pkelly54; 02-04-2013 at 05:14 AM. Reason: spelling

  6. #6
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    Yesterday, Squat 320-could do only 4 reps on last set.Bench 180 failed on last rep of third set, Dead lift 330 went smoothly. Form correction, knees under the chest, is helping. A fellow doing dead lifts near me was rounding his back. I gave him a form suggestion and the reason why a straight back was important. I generally don't make any comments unless, they are working at the squat rack in between my sets and I see something that will eventually hurt the lifter, such as feet not lining up with femur on squats. I have always received a "Thank you" for my effort. I usually suggest they check the Starting Strength website for better information. Now, the squat rack is sometimes a crowded place.

  7. #7
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    Yesterday Squat 310x5, 315x5 and 320x3, last set some fellow was standing next to me looking in the mirror at the gym and waving his arm. I was trying to focus on a mark on the floor in front of me but I saw the movement in the corner of my vision. I was surprise how distracting it was. I am upset with myself for losing concentration. My presses stunk. Last time the weight was easy, this time 155 was hard. I must have been pissed because I did not wait long enough between sets to recover. Power Cleans were OK but racking the weight was all wrong. I need to focus on form. I had recently gone to the Orthopedic about my knee. I was please to hear the pain was arthritis and not a torn meniscus.
    Last edited by pkelly54; 02-12-2013 at 11:14 AM.

  8. #8
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    I had this exact same experience with the press last week by not waiting long enough between sets. Between our size and age and injuries which are nearly identical, it's damned amazing. But I have the arthritis in the knee and most of my other joints, along with a 40+ year complex tear of the meniscus. I just can NOT power clean because of lack of shoulder and wrist mobility. But then I was never flexible, even as a teen.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the comments Mark. Even though we are about the same age, I think you have more tough miles on you. I sat at desk pushing pencils and stuff. You had a more dynamic employ. You have an excuse for all you rips and tears and scars. Me, not so much. I try to avoid the the temptation to accept failure because of my years. You worked and learned and pull 405. That is impressive. I am still in the working and learning stage. "To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield. "
    Last edited by pkelly54; 02-12-2013 at 03:11 PM.

  10. #10
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    starting strength nutrition camp
    Maybe a few more episodic hard miles. The toughest were between ages 15-30. High school and collegiate athletics took the worst toll on me with a broken ankle and I'm sure what would be diagnosed today as concussions in high school football. Then more of the same in college in judo. Another broken ankle, every-toe-on-both-feet (except the big ones) broken at least once and a few multiple times, more concussions, my knee injury, and a seperated shoulder.

    But I didn't get hurt a lot as a cop on patrol, foot chases, or fights. Although I did pick up some stitches along the way. I can't go bald or shave my head. I look like Frankenstein under the thinning hair ditchwater blond hair.

    Sitting in a squad car is not very taxing, and more recently I'm mainly a desk jockey in aerospace security these days.

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