Platform on uneven ground Platform on uneven ground

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Thread: Platform on uneven ground

  1. #1
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    Default Platform on uneven ground

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    So I built a 12ft x 8 ft platform to protect the tiles I am lifting on. The build is as follows: 3/4" rubber --> 2 high quality plywood pieces (to make sure they are straight and prevent warping) --> 3/4" rubber on top.

    Well paying extra for the straight plywoods turned out to be a waste of money since the ground I'm on is actually not straight. Not only is the room a little sloped but the individual tiles on one side are placed poorly and are raised.

    Result:
    1. The deadlift bar roll because of the slope of the room
    2. Since the platform is straight and the tiles are not (the uneven raised ones), one of the corners is not fully on the ground and flops. Obviously I can weight down that corner/side, but that only exacerbates the uneven/rolling issue.

    Shims are an option for the flopping side, but I will really only be able to get shuims in around the edges which leaves alot of spaces that won't be on the ground. That kind of defeats the purpose of the platform since now instead of distributing the weight on the tile evenly, the hot spots will be where the shims are. I am also guessing there will be more bounce in those non contacting inner areas. Lastly, this also doesn't fix the slope issue.

    I should hopefully have a better place to put this platform in a year or so, but till then I'm stuck with this.

    Ideas?

  2. #2
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    Oct 2017
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    I have never tried this, but you could try something like laying down some plastic on the floor and then putting down something like ready foam. You could either trowel and level the foam and let it set or you could lay the plywood down on the foam and manipulate the plywood to be level. Then build the deck from there. You are essentially creating a custom made super shim.

    I do not know if this would work, but it could trigger an idea that will.

  3. #3
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    Jan 2018
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    How big are the individual tiles?
    Is it a perfect square/grid pattern?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeveCieco View Post
    I have never tried this, but you could try something like laying down some plastic on the floor and then putting down something like ready foam. You could either trowel and level the foam and let it set or you could lay the plywood down on the foam and manipulate the plywood to be level. Then build the deck from there. You are essentially creating a custom made super shim.

    I do not know if this would work, but it could trigger an idea that will.
    I wonder if anything soft enough to absorb so much, would inadvertently make the platform worse for lifting (squishy).

    Quote Originally Posted by Fulcrum View Post
    How big are the individual tiles?
    Is it a perfect square/grid pattern?
    20" tiles in a regular grid

  5. #5
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    Jan 2018
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    You are probably going to have to cut up some 1/8" thick veneer plywood material into 20" segments (20x20, 20x40, 20x80, etc) to fix it.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-8-in-x...7562/204727075

    Going to have a lot of time getting intimate with a 6' to 8' long level, playing puzzle pieces, etc.

    Might be able to use a 8' level to figure out exactly how much shimming on each tile.

    Then cover the grid of corrective veneer pieces with some softish underlayment material to even things out (the minor irregularities between tiles).

    Its good you have rubber on the bottom on your platform structure.

    Or get a commerical gym membership for a year.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fulcrum View Post
    You are probably going to have to cut up some 1/8" thick veneer plywood material into 20" segments (20x20, 20x40, 20x80, etc) to fix it.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-8-in-x...7562/204727075

    Going to have a lot of time getting intimate with a 6' to 8' long level, playing puzzle pieces, etc.

    Might be able to use a 8' level to figure out exactly how much shimming on each tile.

    Then cover the grid of corrective veneer pieces with some softish underlayment material to even things out (the minor irregularities between tiles).

    Its good you have rubber on the bottom on your platform structure.

    Or get a commerical gym membership for a year.
    Thanks for the advice. I'm afraid that might be one of my only choices.

    We will see if what I do. I think the part that is currently under my rack is a little more level so I might swap by deadlift/rack positions.

    As far as commercial gym goes, helllllll nooo! Once you go home gym, you never go back!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    42

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    starting strength coach development program
    You could lay a layer of solid plastic in the bottom, then make an outline of the platform using wood and window chaulk. Pour a thin layer of self leveling concrete on top of it and build the platform on top of that.
    If you ever need to remove the platform it will be easy to remove the entire thing.

    I just leveled my platform and it makes a real difference.

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