Platform for Rogue R-3 Platform for Rogue R-3

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Thread: Platform for Rogue R-3

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
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    8

    Default Platform for Rogue R-3

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    Hello

    About to purchase a Rogue R-3 (along with a Rogue flat bench and Ohio Power Bar) for a ground floor room in the house. Looking for some advice on constructing the platform to bolt this thing to. Looking at the plans in the book, Mark suggests a layer of marine grade ply, and multiple layers for a separate platform - I understand this is a suitable material for damp conditions but there is also OSB which is much cheaper, is it a suitable option? As for the size of the platform, I don't really have the luxury of space in front of the rack - will be deadlifting in the rack - so just really need something the depth of bench, so 4ft x 8ft is ideal dimensions. Is one layer enough or do I need to go for two or three? Finally, what is the most suitable method of fixing the rack to the platform? I have seen various suggestions of lag bolts, elevator bolts etc, is there a best approach here? Apologies if i'm overthinking this; it's what I do best. Just want to get it right first time.

    Any input is appreciated!
    thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    North Texas
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    39,878

    Default

    How do you plan to bolt a rack to one layer of material?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    92

    Default

    Rogue's website says, "Important: This rack must be bolted to the floor before use."

    What is the construction of the sub floor on the ground floor of the house?

    If it's concrete slab, then you need to drill the slab and use concrete anchors. Rogue sells them on the R-3 order page. If the floor is up on a foundation then you will need to add some additional bracing because your sub floor is likely only 3/4". I would go back to Rips multiple layers and lag bolt them to the floor joints, then lag bolt the rack to the platform.

    You asked about using OSB, I wouldn't. OSB is not a structurally strong as plywood. Also depending the answer about the sub floor. If the sub floor is concrete then you do have water issues. Your building a great gym and have spend some decent money, why scrimp over $20 a sheet of goods?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
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    3

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    Just build this. You'll be fine.

    How to Build a Weightlifting Platform | The Art of Manliness

    Since you only want 4x8 instead of 8x8, stack 2 sheets of ply, then cut the last one to 4x4 in the middle and trim the mats accordingly. (I ripped my center wood section to 3 feet wide and cut the mats wider than the tutorial. I like it better.) Lag bolts coming up from the bottom worked well for me. Assemble rack, center and mark, drill pilot holes, then bring the bolts up from the bottom, put rack on top, add nuts.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Sahuarita, AZ
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    290

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    I have a similar rack in my garage and built a platform just like in jstoneham's link. I used elevator bolts, which have a flat head and square at the base of the bolt to bite into the wood when you are tightening down the nut. This gave me the bolts facing up yet relatively flush with the OSB underneath. I live in AZ, so low moisture. OSB on the 2 based layers, plywood on the top layer.

    Some thoughts: I built mine just like in the art of manliness link. The rack itself, and particularly the "feet" where you bolt it down would be over the rubber mats. I didn't like that idea, so I reversed the uprights and have them bolted down on the inside. I'm sure I'm one lateral motion away from knocking things over, but it is what I have for now. If I do knock it over, or I sheer a bolt when I retighten it down, I will flip them back around and get some more plywood for the sides where they rack sits. My recommendation - feet out and plywood on the sides of the rack as well. Feel free to use OSB if you aren't concerned about water absorption (low humidity or willing to replace when it rots). 3 layers of 3/4" to make it solid.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    8

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    Hey all

    Really appreciate the helpful answers here. Mark: the process would be the same as bolting it to three, except I'd use shorter bolts.

    I don't know, I'm asking you lot. I'm not an engineer.

    Yeah, I saw the website mentions that it must be bolted to the floor, but the general consensus seems to be that a purpose built platform is also suitable. The construction of the floor is solid timber, but as a tenant I am not permitted to drill holes in the floor. I'm not trying to save money; a friend mentioned that OSB could be better, regardless of price. I just wanted some more opinions really, ideally from people that have used both. It's likely I will use plywood however because it's going into a room which is joined on to the kitchen, which can get a bit steamed up when cooking - the last thing I want is this thing to warp or crumble away a few years down the line. Also it may be moved to an external floor / garage in the future. Likely the moisture handling abilities of plywood would lend itself to a better solution, then. Answered my own question.

    jstoneham thanks for the link, this is extremely useful with some good reasoning in there! I have a bit more reading to do, but I'm almost there..

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    125

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    I use the a I've linked DIY platform from the Art of Manliness site (Matt Reynolds worked with the author on building the platform). Has been working great. Only thing I'd say based on experience is when it says to use either partical board or OSB, go with the OSB.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    714

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    I also built a platform using the Art of Manliness video and guidelines. It worked out beautifully. I used 2 layers of 3/4in OSB and a top layer of stall mats/oak...basically exactly what it called if I recall correctly. I bolted my RM3 to it with 2 or 2.5 inch bolts (can't remember). It is rock solid and I did not have to go into the concrete at all. I'm in a tight space as well, but went for 6x8. Because I wasn't confident I'd have enough room to bench in the rack with 4x4....ok...I just checked and the length of the rogue bench is 48", That doesn't leave enough room to position the bench properly and make sure it is not riding the edges where a slight move under a heavy load doesn't cause you to take a 2 or 3 inch drop off the platform.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
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    3

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    If it matters, abg, I bolted mine down straight through the mats and it's been great. They really aren't super compressible, and you can use washers between the nut and the rack steel too. I think I might have used a washer underneath as well.

    I think the bolts I used are the same as what you refer to as elevator bolts, because they have a rounded-over, shallow head with the square bit section inside. I also didn't worry about the heads too much because my platform's on top of carpet... but I did put 9 carpet sliders under it to make it possible to move it (with significant effort) if I ever need to.

    Use LOTS of screws, even in the middle of the boards, not just around the edges. (Obviously not through the pretty wood top.) I didn't screw mine together well enough in the middle the first time around and when I was trying to pick it up to put the bolts up from the bottom I had the boards bowing and moving on me.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    State College, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    86

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    starting strength coach development program
    We bolted a SML-2C Rogue rack to 2 layers of plywood, because we needed ceiling clearance to put a rack in our den. It was just a small 4x6 foot platform. It held the squat rack and was deep enough for the bench. You could deadlift on it length wise. It worked in a pinch. Was very sturdy even for Caleb Krieg's 400-500 pound squat sets.

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