Questions About Starting Strength Style C-Channel Power Rack Questions About Starting Strength Style C-Channel Power Rack

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Thread: Questions About Starting Strength Style C-Channel Power Rack

  1. #1
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    Default Questions About Starting Strength Style C-Channel Power Rack

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    So I'm considering building a power rack similar to what Rip has at WFAC. Mainly because he made the plans available in the book, materials are cheap, and I can weld so I wouldn't be paying and labor or shipping. However, I have two reservations.

    My main reservation is regarding the J-cups, or rather...the bolts. I can't really think of anything more annoying than having to go get a damned socket every time I want to change the hook position on the rack...and before you say anything about the safety pins acting as hooks...they only act as hooks OUTSIDE the rack. If I wanted to squat and bench outside the rack I wouldn't build a power rack...I'd just get some cheap squat stands.

    Is anyone aware of j-cups that will work with a c channel rack like this? Does anyone have fab plans for a diy solution if they are not commercially available?


    My second reservation has to do with the rigidity. Obviously Rip is of the opinion that these are extremely sturdy racks, more so than square tube racks. However, every time I see a video of someone lifting at WFAC, the racks are shaking all over the place like this: YouTube what's the story here? It seems like a rack that shakes all over the place (particularly if it's not bolted down as mine won't be) is less than ideal, even if it's not about to fall down. Have I just seen people lifting in a bad rack or two, or do they all do this? I've literally never seen a rack quake like that before.

  2. #2
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    How many different racks have you used?

  3. #3
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    Dozen or so designs over the years at different gyms.

    I figure I can add rigidity no problem with the leftover c channel. Mainly concerned with coming up with a convenient way to reset the j cups for different exercises or different height people when folks stop by the house.

  4. #4
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    I don't have a socket that fits the bolts at my gym, because we have never needed one to get the nuts off of the bolts. They are hand-tight only, they loosen quickly, and they have been essentially no trouble for many years. But if you want to spend more money, that's good for the economy.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    I don't have a socket that fits the bolts at my gym, because we have never needed one to get the nuts off of the bolts. They are hand-tight only, they loosen quickly, and they have been essentially no trouble for many years. But if you want to spend more money, that's good for the economy.
    Well hell, now that you say that, yeah I guess the weight of the bar is putting torque on the bolt is a way that is creating tension in the threads so there's no need for it to be more than hand tight.

    Ok...guess the bolts work then. I've very glad you clarified that. Thank you. One advantage to the shoulder bolts too is that I would imagine the bar can be adjusted side to side easier with weight on it than if it were sitting in a plastic lined j cup.

    I've got quote requests out to local metal supply shops for the channel and bar. We shall see what they say. The C4 comes in 20' lengths and if my math is right you need 49' to do it exactly as designed. With the spare 11' I am considering adding a top crossmember on the front and the rear for lateral stability. This guy in Taiwan built one and had quite a bit if side to side flex with his: YouTube
    I'm no enginerd, but I have to imagine 2 extra crossmembers (especially if bolted between the uprights, which also provides the opportunity to cut a logo into it) would help.


    Anyone have any recommendations for a good quality 1-3/8" or 35mm hole saw? The guy in the video above burned through like 5 of them drilling the holes in the uprights.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchell Smith View Post
    Dozen or so designs over the years at different gyms.

    I figure I can add rigidity no problem with the leftover c channel. Mainly concerned with coming up with a convenient way to reset the j cups for different exercises or different height people when folks stop by the house.
    I've seen (pictures) a design where a flat piece of metal with two sets off pins that "pickup" two holes per side.

    Maybe they use a simple lynch pin or hitch-pin behind the top peg (instead of twisting a nut on and off of a bolt).



  7. #7
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    I have a jcup design thatís better than the bolt version ( I have both styles in my weight room neither needs a wrench hand tight works fine)

    Pm me a email address Iíll send you photos
    I donít know how to post photos

    All 6 of my racks are c channel style some Iíve had since the early 70s

    Marks version is a great design

    I built a plywood base for my squat rack which holds it down and my body weight keeps it from tipping if I lose my balance

    One thing you might want to do is modify the dimensions so you can stand it up in a standard height room

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobman View Post
    I have a jcup design that’s better than the bolt version ( I have both styles in my weight room neither needs a wrench hand tight works fine)

    Pm me a email address I’ll send you photos
    I don’t know how to post photos

    All 6 of my racks are c channel style some I’ve had since the early 70s

    Marks version is a great design

    I built a plywood base for my squat rack which holds it down and my body weight keeps it from tipping if I lose my balance

    One thing you might want to do is modify the dimensions so you can stand it up in a standard height room
    Good deal, thanks.

    It doesn't appear that PM's are available on this website. I have added my email address to my profile in the "about me" section. Just click on my name and then "about me" and you'll see it.

  9. #9
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    ok I emailed you several emails showing both the 3 inch ones and the 4 inch ones plus a couple shots of my weight room


    Good luck

    Bob

  10. #10
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    Jul 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchell Smith View Post
    ...Anyone have any recommendations for a good quality 1-3/8" or 35mm hole saw? The guy in the video above burned through like 5 of them drilling the holes in the uprights.
    That is a lot of holes to drill. I have always had good luck with lennox hole saws. Just be sure to use a cutting fluid (tap magic is my go to and I strangely enjoy the smell). An alternative would be to contact a local machine shop that has a plasma table and offers cutting services. A buddy of mine has one at his home shop. Along with cutting the holes it could do any kind of logo/design/script (in whatever font) your heart desires.

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