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Thread: Squat rack v. stand

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smyth View Post
    I have never failed on a squat, and over the years have been both in a rack and using a stand. I don't think I would fail backwards, but I realize you never know. I am pretty confident with my safety arms/pins height. I have failed at a bench a couple times, but never at a squat. Perhaps a good stand would be okay?
    Think about your back angle in the lowbar squat, and where the usual sticking point is. You'd have to try really hard to fail backwards. Back when I was dealing with a nagging hip injury I failed a couple times at the very bottom. Make sure the safeties are at the right height and you're fine. If something goes seriously wrong you just set it back down and crawl out from under it.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dust Devil View Post
    Marathon, not a sprint.
    Marathoners keep running until the end of the race.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dust Devil View Post
    Good for them; they've realized that the risk outweighs the small benefit of that extra .5% of performance that isn't even guaranteed.
    What is the risk associated with grinding out a heavy rep?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dust Devil View Post
    If they bail on a rep, they'll get it next time.
    Unless, of course, the next time they decide that...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dust Devil View Post
    the risk outweighs the small benefit of that extra .5% of performance that isn't even guaranteed.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt James View Post
    Think about your back angle in the lowbar squat, and where the usual sticking point is. You'd have to try really hard to fail backwards. Back when I was dealing with a nagging hip injury I failed a couple times at the very bottom. Make sure the safeties are at the right height and you're fine. If something goes seriously wrong you just set it back down and crawl out from under it.
    I've got the height of the safeties dialed in I think, and I agree regarding the unlikelihood of falling backward, although it appears some view it as a risk.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smyth View Post
    I have never failed on a squat, ...
    This is impressive. I have seen this claim now and then. Your programming must be perfect, or like another class of lifting, otherwise I donít get it.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smyth View Post
    Bottom line from you experts - I'm setting up an outdoor home gym, with limited space (and limited availability of equipment). I will be working out alone most often, so I use the spotter arms at the gym if on a stand. Is it really that much more risky to have a stand, such as the Rogue SML-2 Monster Lite, compared to a rack, such as the Rogue RML-390F or the SS rack? I want to be safe, but don't know enough to assess the risk.
    Although the rack is slightly safer, someone who squats with a back angle close to horizontal as SS recommends is very unlikely to miss the safeties on the stand.

    Although a stand has less need for a permanent dedicated space since it can be easily moved with or without the optional wheels, the footprints of the the 390F and the SML-2 are similar. Depending on the manufacturer, a squat stand with safeties and a pullup bar may not be much cheaper than a power rack.

    For me, the decision to buy a rack was influenced by the additional exercises that can be done with one that aren't possible with a stand. I purchased a Titan X-3 rack, which has similar specs to the 390F for $600 shipped. Although Rogue is always a good option, the quality of the X-3 was very close to that of the Rogue equipment that I had been using at a much lower delivered price. I also purchased the safety straps.

    Although I believe the Titan rack is a great option for the price, I bought two Rogue barbells and a Vulcan competition bench.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by VNV View Post
    This is impressive. I have seen this claim now and then. Your programming must be perfect, or like another class of lifting, otherwise I don’t get it.
    No, hardly. I have have grinded out many close calls with shitty form. When that has happened, I don't go up in weight until I do it right.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Logan1 View Post
    Although the rack is slightly safer, someone who squats with a back angle close to horizontal as SS recommends is very unlikely to miss the safeties on the stand.

    Although a stand has less need for a permanent dedicated space since it can be easily moved with or without the optional wheels, the footprints of the the 390F and the SML-2 are similar. Depending on the manufacturer, a squat stand with safeties and a pullup bar may not be much cheaper than a power rack.

    For me, the decision to buy a rack was influenced by the additional exercises that can be done with one that aren't possible with a stand. I purchased a Titan X-3 rack, which has similar specs to the 390F for $600 shipped. Although Rogue is always a good option, the quality of the X-3 was very close to that of the Rogue equipment that I had been using at a much lower delivered price. I also purchased the safety straps.

    Although I believe the Titan rack is a great option for the price, I bought two Rogue barbells and a Vulcan competition bench.
    Thank you for taking the time to give me this info and opinion. Most helpful.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smyth View Post
    Bottom line from you experts - I'm setting up an outdoor home gym, with limited space (and limited availability of equipment). I will be working out alone most often, so I use the spotter arms at the gym if on a stand. Is it really that much more risky to have a stand, such as the Rogue SML-2 Monster Lite, compared to a rack, such as the Rogue RML-390F or the SS rack? I want to be safe, but don't know enough to assess the risk.
    I have the Rogue Monster Lite short stand and the spotter arms are 16 inches long. They are more than long enough, just dont walk out too far. There is no reason to take long steps with load. I did bolted it down to the platform though as it had a tendency to walk.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smyth View Post
    Thank you for taking the time to give me this info and opinion. Most helpful.
    You're welcome.

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