Squat rack v. stand Squat rack v. stand

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Thread: Squat rack v. stand

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Default Squat rack v. stand

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    Bottom line from you experts - I'm setting up an outdoor home gym, with limited space (and limited availability of equipment). I will be working out alone most often, so I use the spotter arms at the gym if on a stand. Is it really that much more risky to have a stand, such as the Rogue SML-2 Monster Lite, compared to a rack, such as the Rogue RML-390F or the SS rack? I want to be safe, but don't know enough to assess the risk.

  2. #2
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    Oct 2018
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    The only thing that comes to mind for me is the length of the safety bars. I have something closer to the squat stand and the arms are a bit short. This is only a factor in bench pressing; there is a very narrow window where I can avoid hitting the rack with the bar and yet still have the bar over the arms in case I run out of steam. I wish they were a couple of inches longer.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    I was in the same boat, especially concerning the spotter. Having been pinned to the bench during a hasty NLP progression at a big box gym last year, that was my biggest concern building the home gym this year. Also, having a couple of near-limit squat grinds in an overly crowded gym where I would have had to rely on short safety arms to set the bar on convinced me that a rack is only way to go at my house.

    One option that you might consider is Grant's "The General", which can be set up standalone (no bolts to the platform, although you can). Small footprint, but solves a lot of the issues that you're looking at.

    Ordered it on a Friday early this month, had it the following Wednesday. Now the only thing that I don't do inside the rack is my overhead presses.

  4. #4
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    Thank you Dust Devil and Bill. The arms on the Rogue SML-2 look like they'd be long enough, but I saw on one of the forums that a failed squat (where the lifter goes backward?) is a real risk. I can't find it now though.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smyth View Post
    Thank you Dust Devil and Bill. The arms on the Rogue SML-2 look like they'd be long enough, but I saw on one of the forums that a failed squat (where the lifter goes backward?) is a real risk. I can't find it now though.
    Yeah, there's another similar thread where I saw that concern. Mine are long enough for a failed squat, so if the Rogue's are longer, they should be OK. People might be inclined to back away from the rack further than they need to.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dust Devil View Post
    Yeah, there's another similar thread where I saw that concern. Mine are long enough for a failed squat, so if the Rogue's are longer, they should be OK. People might be inclined to back away from the rack further than they need to.
    I have the SML-2. I have failed both the squat and bench - fatigue/weakness, not injury. No issues.

    Agree that people "back away from rack further than they need to" on the squat. You fail the squat by using proper form and setting it on the safeties, not dumping it backwards. If you fear failing, practice it. Some say that "gives you permission to fail." But, it might be better than racking the load before attempting the rep. It depends upon how you "think."

    Check the safety height for both lifts with the empty bar / minimal weights.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mangen View Post
    "gives you permission to fail."
    I see nothing wrong with "permission to fail"; in fact, I think failing to plan for it is foolish. I can push myself just a bit further knowing that I'm protected from trying to exceed my capability. I did practice dumping the bar on the squat, so I knew the proper height of the safety bars and made sure that I could lower the bar with good form. I've only had to use it twice for the squat in 7 years, but a lot more than that in the bench.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dust Devil View Post
    I see nothing wrong with "permission to fail"
    If you've watched how people behave, you'd know that those who've given themselves an out use it. They quit on reps that they could have gotten. Many will do this if they perceive that the bar has slowed down. And coaches and video reveal that their perception of slow is terrible -- they have it, the bar is moving well, they just give up. Sad.

  9. #9
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    I have never failed on a squat, and over the years have been both in a rack and using a stand. I don't think I would fail backwards, but I realize you never know. I am pretty confident with my safety arms/pins height. I have failed at a bench a couple times, but never at a squat. Perhaps a good stand would be okay?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    If you've watched how people behave, you'd know that those who've given themselves an out use it.
    Good for them; they've realized that the risk outweighs the small benefit of that extra .5% of performance that isn't even guaranteed. If they bail on a rep, they'll get it next time. Marathon, not a sprint.

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