Confused about what size belt I should buy Confused about what size belt I should buy

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Thread: Confused about what size belt I should buy

  1. #1
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    Default Confused about what size belt I should buy

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    Was just wondering what size belt I should get. The brand I'm looking at has a 32"-40" option or a 36"-44" option. I currently have a 40" waist sitting at 24.9 bmi. I really want to continue to drop my bmi down to somewhere between 15-20%. My question is will my waist get smaller or bigger by follow the SS program? And by how many inches (i know this is variable) is it typical for your waist to change by?

    The 36"-44" is the best option for me currently but if this program is going to drastically decrease/increase by waist circumference then I could outgrow the belt quickly.

  2. #2
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    Jun 2019
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    Remember that for a weight belt it's not a matter of what your waist will do, but what your abdominal circumference (around your navel) will do. Sure, your waist will decrease, but while you might lose some bodyfat in the abdomen, all of the muscles in your back and abdomen should get larger if you're following the program.

    See Dominion Strength Training's page on belt sizing. BTW, their belts are top-notch quality.

  3. #3
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    Oct 2020
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    Go bigger my guy, you can always punch extra holes in a bigger belt u can get a leather punch from Amazon for cheap just bought on myself works like a charm.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by MeatyMan View Post
    Was just wondering what size belt I should get. The brand I'm looking at has a 32"-40" option or a 36"-44" option. I currently have a 40" waist sitting at 24.9 bmi. I really want to continue to drop my bmi down to somewhere between 15-20%. My question is will my waist get smaller or bigger by follow the SS program? And by how many inches (i know this is variable) is it typical for your waist to change by?

    The 36"-44" is the best option for me currently but if this program is going to drastically decrease/increase by waist circumference then I could outgrow the belt quickly.
    I think you mean body fat %, not BMI. BMI 15-20 is incompatible with being fairly strong.

    That being said, you will probably lose a few inches off your waist circumference, depending on where you are in your lifting career and how “meaty” you want to continue being. I will say that when I had to order a new smaller belt, it was very satisfying. And I agree with others that it’s better to add holes to make a belt smaller than to squeeze into a belt that doesn’t quite fit.

    And when you have advanv

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfsully View Post
    I think you mean body fat %, not BMI. BMI 15-20 is incompatible with being fairly strong.

    That being said, you will probably lose a few inches off your waist circumference, depending on where you are in your lifting career and how “meaty” you want to continue being. I will say that when I had to order a new smaller belt, it was very satisfying. And I agree with others that it’s better to add holes to make a belt smaller than to squeeze into a belt that doesn’t quite fit.

    And when you have advanv
    Sorry, got cut off by a accidentally submitting with my fat thumb on a phone screen.

    And when you have advanced and trimmed down to where you need a new belt, you may have a different idea about what kind of belt you want: 3" vs 4", etc. Buying new gear is fun! But to save the most money possible, buy what fits now and punch holes in it if it gets too big.

  6. #6
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    Most people go too big on their first belt. You have typical bodyfat for a guy so you will definitely get smaller around the middle, not bigger. A belt looks much better when there's not several inches of excess leather hanging out of the buckle. I've noticed that the more experienced lifters don't have a bunch of leather flopping around at the end.

    Most belts have 10" of adjustment but yours will have just 8". That is tricky when you are right at the borderline.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfsully View Post
    I think you mean body fat %, not BMI. BMI 15-20 is incompatible with being fairly strong.
    Isn't bmi a metric of body fat %? Anyways, thanks for the advice. I decided to go with the 36"-44" inch belt and just add my own holes if it ever comes to that.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MeatyMan View Post
    Isn't bmi a metric of body fat %? Anyways, thanks for the advice. I decided to go with the 36"-44" inch belt and just add my own holes if it ever comes to that.
    BMI measurement only takes into account weight and height. It doesn't take into account body composition. I know many people whose BMI is roughly the same as when they were pro athletes but their body fat has increased significantly. My BMI is over 26 which is considered overweight and the printout from my last physical suggests that I need to modify my diet and get more exercise. My body fat using the Navy calculator varies between 8 and 10% which is very low for someone in their 60's. Although the amount of muscle around your midsection will increase as your core gets stronger, changes in waist size are a reasonable and easy to measure way to track changes in body fat on your own.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Logan1 View Post
    BMI measurement only takes into account weight and height. It doesn't take into account body composition. I know many people whose BMI is roughly the same as when they were pro athletes but their body fat has increased significantly. My BMI is over 26 which is considered overweight and the printout from my last physical suggests that I need to modify my diet and get more exercise. My body fat using the Navy calculator varies between 8 and 10% which is very low for someone in their 60's. Although the amount of muscle around your midsection will increase as your core gets stronger, changes in waist size are a reasonable and easy to measure way to track changes in body fat on your own.
    Rodger that. Is BMI a good indicator of body fat % in an untrained individual? I thought I heard RIP say that at some point but I could be wrong.

  10. #10
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    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by MeatyMan View Post
    Rodger that. Is BMI a good indicator of body fat % in an untrained individual? I thought I heard RIP say that at some point but I could be wrong.
    If Mark believes so, then I would accept his opinion on this. Many of my friends and family members competed through college and have generally stayed in decent age-adjusted shape, so BMI isn't something that I have ever considered useful on a personal level. Still, it does give one a height-adjusted measure of where one would stand among the members of the general population. If you want an easy to use approximation of body fat the Navy calculator is one. One that considered wrist and ankle size as well might be a bit more accurate. Again, my advice would be to track your waist size over time.

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