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Thread: horse stall mat over concrete

  1. #31
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    Mar 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arkansan View Post
    What if you used one layer of plywood instead of two? Would that be good enough for a garage floor?
    Maybe. Maybe not. Let us know if you find out.

  2. #32
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    Sep 2018
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    I wouldn't use OSB for the driveway because it is heavier than plywood and soaks up water. You can screw handles or straps onto the platform so you can move it more easily. I used 3 layers of treated plywood. The extra layer of plywood feels nice. If you use short screws you can screw the middle layer to the bottom layer, then the top layer to the middle layer, then the stall mat to the top layer. I just used treated deck screws. You can always just move the rack instead of the platform. Coach's plans are excellent, BTW.

  3. #33
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    May 2020
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    If cost is an issue, a 4x8 deadlift platform with two layers of plywood would provide better protection for the underlying floor than an 8x8 platform with one layer.

    Although Rogue's Olympic lifting platforms are either 6x8 or 8x8, the company's deadlift platform is 4x8. For someone who is serious about Olympic lifting a 6' or 8' wide platform would be beneficial, but a lifter who will only be doing deadlifts and power cleans shouldn't have problem with a 4' wide platform.

    Earlier this year, I bought a Rogue 6x8 platform with twelve 24"x24"x1.5" tiles for less than I could have made one. Otherwise, I would have been fine with a 4' wide platform. Although I don't drop weights and have urethane plates, I intend to put a sheet of plywood underneath the platform.

  4. #34
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    Oct 2014
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    Have any of you had to level the SS platform you've built. I am going to put it on a driveway that is not completely level. Do you just use wooden shims under the low edge to level it? Any recommendation would be welcome. Also, if you use shims of some kind, is there an issue with the entire platform not being flush with the ground, such as noise or more risk to the underlying surface?

  5. #35
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    Sep 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smyth View Post
    Have any of you had to level the SS platform you've built. I am going to put it on a driveway that is not completely level. Do you just use wooden shims under the low edge to level it? Any recommendation would be welcome. Also, if you use shims of some kind, is there an issue with the entire platform not being flush with the ground, such as noise or more risk to the underlying surface?
    There is a video of the owner of kabuki showing how to shim (a garage) with asphalt shingles. The entire platform needs to be touching the ground.

  6. #36
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    Mar 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Logan1 View Post
    If cost is an issue, a 4x8 deadlift platform with two layers of plywood would provide better protection for the underlying floor than an 8x8 platform with one layer.
    Plates are the only really good place to save money. This is a $1000-$2000 endeavor. I'd recommend spending the extra $50 on the thing you stand on and protect your floor with.

  7. #37
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    May 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smyth View Post
    Have any of you had to level the SS platform you've built. I am going to put it on a driveway that is not completely level. Do you just use wooden shims under the low edge to level it? Any recommendation would be welcome. Also, if you use shims of some kind, is there an issue with the entire platform not being flush with the ground, such as noise or more risk to the underlying surface?
    Level or flat? A typical garage floor is fairly flat but not level. They slope towards the front to facilitate drainage in the event of flooding. Leveling the platform is a waste of time if there's room for the platform to be placed lengthwise in the direction of the slope. If the platform can't be positioned this way for some reason then yes, it has to be shimmed. If the shimmed platform doesn't lie flat on the floor or driveway it may be hard on the platform but that won't make it any harder on the floor or pavement.

  8. #38
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    Jul 2007
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    North Texas
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    If there is air anywhere between the platform and the concrete, if you drop a heavy-enough deadlift on that gap, the platform will break.

  9. #39
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    Oct 2014
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    Thanks, all. My issue is my driveway not being level, although it is flat. It slopes slightly sort of from the back left corner to the right front corner.

  10. #40
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    Jan 2014
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    I was thinking of just building a deadlift platform, but it would fit oddly in my garage with the rack. The 8x8 would just be the way to go and I'd still be able to get the cars in there.

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