A Middle Aged Adolescent  (who cannot possibly be the only one) A Middle Aged Adolescent (who cannot possibly be the only one) - Page 29

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  1. #281
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    • wichita falls texas december seminar 2020
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    The body count is probably not much different from that of previous years, but when a big star like the Giants’ Saquon Barkley goes down with a season ending knee injury, sportscasters and fans take notice. This is Saquon (SAY kwon) - with the 405 power clean video that every high school football player has on his cell phone, Saquon with the massively muscular thighs and other ‘insane!’ off season training videos around the net. Nick Bosa, another star, one of the two dominant, monsters-of-the-weight-room, defensive line playing Bosa bothers, was also lost in the second week of the season. I saw the game in which Pittsburgh Steeler tackle Zach Banner went down, as well as the moment when Dallas tight end Blake Jarwin collapsed in a heap.
    ‘What is going on with ACL injuries?’ sportscasters wondered. Other stars like Christian McCaffrey and Jimmy Garappolo are out with different injuries, which has made the on-air conversations turn to whether a lack of a preseason meant players were not conditioned or ‘hardened’ for contact.
    I find myself intrigued by the ACL injuries, especially those of Barkley, Bosa, and Jarwin. I have some suspicions.

    Deep within the knee, the anterior cruciate ligament attaches inside the lateral notch of the distal femur. At the other end of an inward, downward slant, it blends with part of the medial meniscus at the top front of the tibia. The ACL is intended to resist anterior tibial translation - which is the shinbone moving forward relative to the thighbone - as well as internal tibial rotation, all for the sake of stability. The anterior cruciate ligament also has mechanoreceptors that sense movement, position, speed, acceleration, and tension. Damage to an ACL can be a catastrophic crack in the foundation of an athletic career.
    Try this if you’re at your desk: stand up, spread out your feet beyond shoulder width, and jump down into a linebacker’s ready stance. Looking down, if you see your big toes inside your knees, then you’re all set. While you’re there, let one of your legs roll inward, so that your knee cap appears to be inside your big toe. You’ll feel a bit of the twist, but this is the position in which anterior cruciate ligament tears most often happen.
    Blake Jarwin of the Cowboys was all by himself, running a pass route. He faked to the right, which meant that his right foot turned fairly far outward, yet he went left - planting hard on his right leg to change direction with that misalignment in his knee. When his femur turned as his shinbone stayed in place, the planting force attacked the ligament at the worst possible angle. Jarwin dropped like he was shot. 70 percent of ACL injuries do not involve contact.

    So wait: all you have to do is have your foot turned way out, or be in a knock-kneed position, plant and turn, and you’ll shred your ACL? How does this not happen more often? How did I go through a lifetime of backyard or schoolyard football and basketball, with all kinds of clumsy, careless leaping around, years of Judo - or even busting moves on the dance floor - and not have to get carted off at some point?
    Also, while I’m being irresponsible: Saquon Barkley is in numerous strength training videos on the net. At Penn State, he power cleaned 405 and had reasonably deep, free standing squat sets with 500-plus pounds. In more recent months, however, he’s been doing box squats and NOT getting below parallel. He’s neglecting his hamstrings, and ‘Sa-Quads’ has also decided that hex bar deadlifts are among his favorite exercises. He’s training partial ranges of motion.
    You can find videos of Saquon or other NFL stars ‘crushing’ their training, ‘preparing to dominate’ by partially squatting 585 to a bench with pads on it. I’d imagine that half the guys on this website could do that as well. I can see the MEN’S JOURNAL Instagram post: ‘Goofy Dads match NFL stars in lower body workout.’ Below that: ‘They’re probably making a point here, but experts don’t know what it is.’
    Nick Bosa, the 49’er defensive lineman, is a 265-plus pound muscular beast who squatted 500 pounds while still in high school. However, he elected to skip his final year at Ohio State in order to get ‘core surgery,’ and then prepare for an NFL career. If a guy had surgery somewhere deep in his gut or pelvis, what’s the first exercise he’s going to bag?
    Bosa tore his knee up as he was planted where he stood by an offensive lineman. His left leg, bent at the knee, was pinned beneath him. Dude, you haven’t been doing your squats.
    Football is a brutal game with infinite possible combinations of violent forces and awkward positions. Maybe these guys just got caught in the wrong place at the wrong time. Still, blowing off their squats is where the line of questioning would begin if we could wheel them into an interrogation room.

    For the sake of comparison, I decided to check out some videos of stars whose Hall of Fame careers depended upon their resilience. Barry Sanders, the great Detroit Lions running back, who also won the Heisman at Oklahoma State, was a master at bouncing off of hits, making jump cuts, spins, and feints as one of the greatest ever to play the game. In the highlight videos, as he changes directions in an instant, his feet never get out from underneath him. If he wants to fake right and go left, he won’t plant his right foot out and away as a brace. Instead, he’ll make a small jump with both feet and his hips to the right while his upper body leans left. As he weaves among defenders, he actually resembles a hockey player leaning to turn as he skates, his feet directly in line with his backbone and hips.
    Mike Webster, the Steeler center and Biblical figure, tended to run his opponents out of each play. He’d stay low and chug with his legs. If he decked them, he’d be happy to land right on top, or he’d keep on going, the logic being to get away from the flying bodies that could hit his knees in the chaos.
    Randy White, the great Dallas Cowboy defensive lineman, had strength to match Webster’s. He’s a martial arts guy as well, and in a video he demonstrates a ‘wax-on, wax-off’ maneuver to get a blocker’s hands away - but he goes on to say, ‘Turn your hips,’ in order to operate from a powerful - and safe - leverage.

    Saquon didn’t turn his hips. On a run to the right, having threaded through the line of scrimmage, he’s heading about 45 degrees away from straight upfield. A moment after breaking into daylight, he’s met by a Chicago defensive back who has an advantageous angle, if not overwhelming force. The Chicago guy’s plan is to run him out of bounds, but Saquon, wanting to sling him aside, plants his right foot as an outrigger. You can see it’s turned out too much. His knee caves inward, and he’s done.
    Saquon Barkley Torn ACL Injury vs. Bears | NFL Week 2 - YouTube

    According to THE JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING, anterior cruciate ligament injuries number close to 200,000 every year. Surgery to repair them has become a billion dollar industry. Football is the leading cause for males; soccer, followed closely by basketball, creates the most injuries in females. ACL tears are a particular worry for female athletes. In the years following puberty, as leg bones get longer and hips wider - without the accompanying development of stabilizing muscle, the resulting ‘Q angle’ lends itself to an inward collapse of the knee.
    If surgery is a billion dollar industry, then rehabilitation and prevention have become so as well. A few pediatric or scientific foundations have published prevention protocols, which these sports training places are following, broadly - but lots of folks are getting in on the act, and this explains some of the nutty things seen on websites: kids crab-walking sideways with bands around their knees, the idea being to get them flexing anywhere but inward. Videos of the full protocol on YouTube are dull to the point of anesthetizing, but also almost comedically basic. Athletes jog a bit; they do lunges, ‘airplanes’ where they spread out their arms and balance on alternating legs, and sideways shuffles. Eventually they work up to sort of a ‘speed skater’ drill, where they leap sideways from one leg to the other, freezing in place in a sort of epic looking stride. In fairness, they do get to change of direction training, and I have to remind myself that this is a sign of the times, that coaches and trainers nowadays have to make up for a childhood of not playing hard outdoors the way their parents and grandparents did. That would mean that we taught ourselves, purely by chance and repetition, playing driveway hoop, ultimate frisbee, and army, to run our knees along the outer edges of our feet, the way that young athletes are being guided today - for 100 dollars an hour.
    In its extreme form, this neurological training can be seen in a video in which New Orleans Saints back Alvin Kamara balances on a bosu ball and on command catches particular colored ends of flying three-spoked batons. With a great number of ‘unanticipated reactions and movement perturbations,’ a trainer says, ‘the athlete is forced to react quickly to maintain joint stability.’ Hmmm: his proprioception programmed thoroughly, Alvin Kamara would never wind up in an ungainly position the way Saquon did.

    (Continued below)

  2. #282
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    (from above)

    Let’s just tie these joints together with strong friggin’ muscles, you’re saying. Hurry up, dude. Let’s get back to squats.
    I hear you. My casual internet scan on the subject reveals varying levels of sophistication. One idea that pops up, often without explanation, is that injuries frequently occur in athletes whose quad muscles are stronger than their hamstrings. Strengthen your hams, they say, but it appears that experts arrived at this recommendation in backwards fashion, noticing comparatively weak hams among surgery patients. Only some of them explain that hamstrings are immensely powerful muscles that tie into the back of the tibia and reinforce the role of the ACL.
    Now we’re back in familiar territory. Legend has it that Barry Sanders, who only made it to 5’8” and 200 pounds, was a very unimpressive high school freshman at 5 feet and 105 pounds, benching 95 when he first headed to the weight room. As a Detroit Lion, he was a cannonball, squatting 565, benching 360, and power cleaning 365. His deadlift was not listed, but 565 and 365 would suggest at least a 650 dead and hamstrings that were probably pretty useful. All that power went into changes of direction that flouted physics, or it laid shots on the defenders who did bring him down.
    Some coaches on the net are pretty good. One guy, pulling at blockers with bands around their waists, instructs, ‘When you’re getting bent over sideways, out of position, get your ass down and behind you again, so you can take on his force.’
    Exactly, Webster and White would agree. That’s an orientation Saquon Barkley and Nick Bosa would seem to have forgotten, as well as a strength they’ve lost.
    Barry Sanders never spiked the ball or did a touchdown dance. He’d just toss the ball to the referee. ‘This isn’t my first time in the end zone,’ was the message, ‘and it won’t be the last.’

    (5, 3, & 2 and 3, 2, 1 rotation)
    Week of: 10/5/20 3 and 2 week
    MONDAY
    1. Squat: 4 sets of 3 Tom 402.5
    2. Romanian deadlifts: 2x5; 2x2 365, 405
    3. Power Cleans (3x3) light JC 75 - 95
    3. 4 sets of heavy shrugs 485
    4. reverse hypers (3x10)
    5. abs; banded pulldowns

    TUESDAY
    1. Inclined bench press: 3 sets of 5 Tom 205
    2. Bench press: 4 sets; 2x 5, 225, add 50#: 2 sets of 2
    3. 5 sets of 10 Hanging rows
    4. Barbell curls: 4 sets of 8
    Conditioning (second session)
    sled pull 2 miles; 20, 0 (and six 50-yard runs)

    THURSDAY
    1. Deadlift: work up to a set of 2* reps Tom 505
    2. Deadlift: back off sets - 90% of top set; 2 sets of same* reps Tom 450
    3. Squats: (90% of Monday’s weight) 2 sets of 5, 350; 2 sets of 3 with chains 360
    4. Reverse Hypers (3x10)
    5. abs: hollow rockers

    FRIDAY
    1. Inclined Bench Press: (10 sets of 3) Tom 162.5, mini bands
    2. Press: 4 sets Tom 162.5 - 182.5
    3. Pull ups (5x10)
    4. Barbell curls: 4 sets of 8
    5. 3 sets kettlebell sit ups

    SATURDAY - Conditioning
    swim 1 mile `

  3. #283
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    ‘Did you see that guy who stopped to watch you?’ my wife asked the other night. ‘When you and Mick were practicing, he stood next to his car and was watching for a while. He had never seen that before.’
    I did notice a guy who had come to our neighbor’s house to pick up a bike, which he snapped onto a rack on the back of his SUV. A buddy and I were practicing our combatives. We had some mats out on the grass and were too busy trying to tear each other’s heads off to notice much else.

    A few months ago I wrote about our little combatives group. We had met during a seminar put on by a big shot in the business, and since then we’d get together on weekends to work on various skills. If we’re doing anything right, it’s that we’re pressure testing ideas all the time by way of actual fighting, either boxing or grappling, often in armor, since the collisions and the sheer power of the elbows and knees involved gets pretty dangerous.
    We had identified a progression fights tend to follow, which we study as phases, each with its own set of particular skills:
    1. Fisticuffs - at a distance
    2. The Collision
    3. Flanking, or moving into a position of advantage
    4. Takedown
    5. Ground work
    Ideally, as I learned from the Sambo guys, a fight should be a process of constantly gaining advantage, not just engaging on equal terms. It might start that way, if someone starts taking swings at you in a parking lot. At the very least, you should hold your own. Maybe you’ll get a shot in and press the advantage from there.
    If not, and the boxing’s not going your way, a crash, which is an elbow intensive, full bodyweight battering ram, can overpower his punching. Maybe then you’ve got him staggered and have turned the tables - or if that didn’t work, and you’ve managed to gain some separation, it’s time to go running.

    A well executed crash, which is a powerful drop step lunge with a roundhouse clubbing forearm or a driving, pointed elbow - as if you’ve just racked a power clean, although you’re protecting your head - usually has a dramatic effect. The other day, in front of our audience, we were exploring what happens when a crash doesn’t go so well. The short answer is that you’re in another stalemate, a stand-up grapple where whoever is faster, meaner, stronger, or luckier will win.
    Yes, there are elbows, hooks, and knees to be thrown, and maybe even a throw or a duck-under, but nothing is very effective if you’re not controlling the other guy’s center of gravity, which is nearly impossible to achieve in an all-out struggle.
    You have to be constantly gaining advantage. Fights have to be asymmetrical.
    What that guy saw us doing was grappling a bit with honest effort before slowing down to consider the dirtier options, and then strapping up with armor to whale the crap out of one another like Rock-‘Em-Sock-‘Em Robots, which is what happens to the best laid plans.

    I’m flattered that this guy was intrigued enough to watch. Hopefully, what he saw was that we were engrossed in what we were doing, laughing and trading insults as we rassled, or stopping to consider ideas here and there. What intrigues a man more, knowing how to thrash an enemy or embrace a friend?

    (5, 3, & 2 and 3, 2, 1 rotation)
    Week of: 10/12/20 2 and 1 week
    MONDAY
    1. Squat: 3 sets of 2: Tom 432.5
    2. Romanian deadlifts: 4 sets of 5 reps 365
    3. Power Cleans (3x3) light JC 75 - 95
    3. 4 sets of heavy shrugs 485
    4. reverse hypers (3x10)
    5. abs; banded pulldowns

    TUESDAY
    1. Inclined bench press: 3 sets of 2 Tom 225
    2. Bench press: 2 sets of 8 Tom 227.5, then add 50# 2 sets of 1-2 chains
    3. 5 sets of 10 Hanging rows
    4. Barbell curls: 4 sets of 8
    Conditioning (second session)
    sled pull 2 miles; 20, 0 (and six 50-yard runs)

    THURSDAY
    1. Deadlift: work up to a set of 1* reps Tom 522.5
    2. Deadlift: back off sets - 90% of top set; 2 sets of same* reps Tom 470
    3. Squats: (90% of Monday’s weight) 2x5 350; 2x2 387.5
    4. Reverse Hypers (3x10)
    5. abs: hollow rockers

    FRIDAY
    1. Inclined Bench Press: (10 sets of 2) Tom 165, mini bands
    2. Press: 4 sets: Tom 165-185
    3. Pull ups (5x10)
    4. Barbell curls: 4 sets of 5
    5. 3 sets kettlebell sit ups

    SATURDAY - Conditioning
    swim 1 mile

  4. #284
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    When I was in high school, the SPORTS ILLUSTRATED writer E.M. Swift came to speak to a journalism class I was in. I’m sure it was an hour long presentation, but through the years only one moment has stuck with me, though very strongly. In fact, I can picture exactly where he was standing as he said this.
    ‘These people are not normal,’ he explained about the stars he profiled or interviewed week after week. ‘They’re not regular folks like you and me. They are driven, to the exclusion of other things in their lives. Did you guys read that piece on Wayne Gretzky I did a few months ago?’
    Of course we all did. SPORTS ILLUSTRATED was an institution, the preeminent, definitive weekly sports magazine, to which we all had a subscription. Really, it was the only weekly sports magazine of that era, the third pillar of the then TIME-LIFE publishing empire. Its articles wrapped up events in all the major sports, and its extended features detailed the stars or issues of the day.
    On another occasion we met Douglas Looney, who described his writing process: pulling an all nighter in his hotel room after the NBA game he just saw, and then phoning the office in New York in the morning to dictate his story to a secretary. Obviously, somebody’s Dad was a big shot at TIME-LIFE to get these guys to come in, but this was like having Howard Cosell or Muhammad Ali visit. They were heavyweights in American culture, shaping the narrative that formed our view of the world.
    ‘OK, so here’s the thing,’ Swift confided. ‘I had to massage that piece [on Gretzky] a little. There really wasn’t much to him. This is a kid whose father fired pucks around the boards during drills in their backyard rink everyday - for years. He’s a hockey machine, though at the expense of his personality. I had to spice the story up a bit.’

    I found that October 12, 1981 piece online, in the SPORTS ILLUSTRATED Vault. Swift walks a very fine line, putting the best possible face on an unsophisticated teenager catapulted to fame as the star of the Edmonton Oilers. He’s under the protection of his agent, as well as his visiting mother and sister. “‘I’m not big on independency,’ he says.’’
    In Gretzky’s defense, he was SO young that he did his growing up in the years he was considered a national hero. Swift does drop a few hints regarding immaturity: not only Gretzky’s lack of size but a lack of worldliness despite being famous for some time already; a girlfriend who craves attention, and an overriding desire to please his father, who prepared him for this opportunity.
    I always remembered Swift’s point, however: elite athletes are bent, driven, and not normal people.

    Most of us understand this as we plan our lives around workouts or have to explain ourselves to acquaintances who fail to see the appeal of heavy iron. A definitive sense of purpose is pretty deep stuff, however, especially if we haven’t put our finger on exactly what ours is. We lift to . . . be, to achieve, to experience, to become . . . . something. We should probably take stock of this once in a while.

    It’s easier to see purpose - or lack thereof - in others. NFL quarterback Tom Brady has gathered his receivers for extra workouts throughout his career. Upon his move to Tampa Bay in the Spring, he and a few of his new teammates headed to the park but were soon rounded up by the cops for violating coronavirus restrictions. Brady went home and picked up the phone to call a nearby private school, happily renting time on one of their fields, which is private property.
    When positive coronavirus tests mandated a shutdown of operations for the Tennessee Titans, quarterback Ryan Tannehill and a handful of receivers similarly started working out at a private school field. They had no choice, they felt.
    In Washington, the young, starting quarterback Dwayne Haskins has not only been benched but given an express pass to third string status. A few days after the initial story broke, a small article appeared in THE WASHINGTON POST with an apparent scoop: the team was not pleased by his lack of effort in or out of practice. He had been approached and urged along by at least one veteran player, to no avail. The results in games have spoken for themselves. This is not college ball anymore, Brady and Tannehill would tell him. You can’t just throw rainbows and let your receivers run underneath them. NFL ball is a precise, split-second business, and if you don’t keep those skills sharp, you’re done.

    This is all a long way of backing into the thought that crossed my mind as I read about Haskins. I’m just speculating, of course - but - if he’s not just young and dumb, thinking he’s hot stuff, then maybe he is done. Maybe he’s seen enough of the game to decide he doesn’t have the stomach for the fight. If he doesn’t have a purpose, a personal sense of ‘Why’ he’s playing this game, then he can’t be driven in his pursuit.
    The day Wayne Gretzky shed his father’s ambitions for his own was the day he had done most of his growing up. Similarly, each one of us getting under the bar should be able to say why. What is your purpose in getting strong?

    I’ve had to back into this answer as well. Being strong is my way to be capable and healthy, but this ain’t easy: whether it’s old age or being at the top of the slope of my potential, progress has slowed. Physically, I have to gut out limit sets, since anything else is wasting time, and mentally, I have to figure out the programming that will work best.
    That meets the criteria for being driven, which then I can turn around to identify my purpose by filling in this sentence: ‘I’m knocking myself out because ______________.’
    I’m knocking myself out because I want to be a living example and subject matter expert in elite performance. (You should be able to say it in a single sentence.)
    I want to know that I’ve topped the Everest of my potential in an activity that has defined my identity since I was 14. This is also an important metaphor for excellence in other aspects of my life, personal and professional.
    That’s the lesson in the stories about Wayne Gretzky and Dawyne Haskins. It’s OK to be bent, driven, and not normal, as long as you have a good reason for it.

    (5, 3, & 2 and 3, 2, 1 rotation)
    Week of: 10/19/20 5 and 3 week
    MONDAY
    1. Squat: 5, 5, 1, 1; with 80, 90% 377.5, 435
    2. Romanian deadlifts: 2x5 reps; 2x2; 365, 405
    3. Power Cleans (3x3) light JC 75 - 95
    3. 4 sets of heavy shrugs 485
    4. reverse hypers (3x10)
    5. abs; banded pulldowns

    TUESDAY
    1. Inclined bench press: 3 sets of 8 Tom 187.5
    2. Bench press: 2 sets of 5 Tom 230; add 50 lbs - 2x1 or 2
    3. 5 sets of 10 Hanging rows
    4. Barbell curls: 4 sets of 8
    Conditioning (second session)
    sled pull 2 miles; 20, 0 (and six 50-yard runs)

    THURSDAY
    1. Deadlift: work up to a set of 3* reps Tom 477.5
    2. Deadlift: back off sets - 90% of top set; 2 sets of same* reps Tom 430
    3. Squats: (90% of Monday’s weight) 4 sets of 5 Tom 340 chains
    4. Reverse Hypers (3x10)
    5. abs: hollow rockers

    FRIDAY
    1. Inclined Bench Press: (10 sets of 2-3) Tom 165, including chains
    2. Press: 2 x 5 reps; 2x2 167.5, 187.5
    3. Pull ups (5x10)
    4. Barbell curls: 4 sets of 5
    6. 3 sets kettlebell sit ups

    SATURDAY - Conditioning
    swim 1 mile

  5. #285
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    starting strength coach development program
    IN THE NEWS: The original Santa and Rudolph puppets from the 1964 classic Christmas show RUDOLPH THE RED NOSED REINDEER are going up for auction. Created by a master puppet maker and used in the stop-motion production made in Japan, they’ve passed through a number of owners over the years but are still expected to fetch somewhere between 150 and 250 thousand dollars.
    These are American icons. I had to explain to my spoiled kids that they’re privileged to have the show on DVD. When I was their age, the world simply stopped the night ‘Rudolph’ came on TV, as every year America’s youth - from Kindergarten through high school - rejoined these old friends for their lessons on friendship, growing up, and the spirit of Christmas.
    In a masterstroke of emotional, dramatic irony, ‘Rudolph’ also managed probably the greatest cutaway shot in the history of film. On the Island of Misfit Toys, it’s Christmas Eve, yet even after the chance visit from Rudolph, Herbie, and Yukon Cornelius had raised everyone’s hopes, the prospect for finding real homes looks bleak once more. The Charlie-in-the-Box, Spotted Elephant, and Dolly for Sue, completely oblivious to all the crazy miracles that went Rudolph’s way, are gathered around a fire in the cold. The snow falls. Despair hangs in the silence.
    ‘Well, it’s Christmas Eve, but . . . ‘
    ‘Looks like we’re forgotten again.’
    ‘But Rudolph promised we’d go this time.’
    Charlie laments, his voice breaking, ‘Oh, I guess the storm was too much for them.’
    We cut to a view of the night sky, a fast moving light, and the faintest shaking of bells: Santa’s sleigh! - inbound, 30 seconds from their joyous rescue - but still too far away for them to realize it.
    The fate of these national treasures is now another thing we have to worry about over these next two weeks. If ever there were a time for someone like Tom Hanks or Oprah Winfrey to stroke a check and have these two sent to the Smithsonian, this is it.

    This comes in conjunction with another news story, a WASHINGTON POST profile of Maryland resident Martin Goldsmith, who’s just gained possession of a 16th Century brass, bronze, and iron kettle which had once belonged to his family. As Jews in Oldenburg, Germany in the early 1930’s, they were forced to unload their home and possessions for next to nothing. Two children from that family managed to escape; the rest of the family were killed. Goldsmith, the son of one escapee, worked with an expert who specializes in returning property looted by the Nazis.
    For years, Goldsmith kept his heritage at arm’s length. When he changed his mind, he plunged into the subject, having his Bar Mitzvah at age 55, visiting Oldenburg, and writing two books about his family, one of which is being made into a documentary film. Still, the strongest connection to the grandparents he never met came in the form of that ancient kettle. Every night before bed he touches it - something they had touched - as if to say goodnight to his family.

    Apparently, it was quite the emotional moment when that kettle arrived on Goldsmith’s doorstep. That must be something, holding an object like that and imagining the lives, hands, and events that have swirled around it through the years. Artifacts can provide the crowning touches to defining one’s heritage. In learning history, we come to understand how we wound up where we are. Identity is then making an informed choice on whom we’re going to be. You could put on your father or grandfather’s shoulder boards once you make rank, or you can contemplate the shackles that enslaved your ancestors and decide to break free of the ones in your own life.

    Santa and Rudolph belong in a museum, so we can all remember those nights sitting crosslegged on the floor as we watched them. Our more private keepsakes should be where we can lay hands on them once in a while, to maintain connections to moments or people that are no longer with us. In my gym, this is a pair of 85-pound flywheels, weights from my high school weight room, which was not only a safe haven for growing up but also a surprisingly elite training center, I would later come to appreciate.
    As I load them on the bar, I think of all the greatness they’ve witnessed. I’m reminded: live in such a way that someone will want to keep a piece of you someday.

    (5, 3, & 2 and 3, 2, 1 rotation)
    Week of: 10/26/20 3 and 2 week
    MONDAY
    1. Squat: 4 sets of 3 Tom 405
    2. Romanian deadlifts: 2x5; 2x2 365, 405
    3. Power Cleans (3x3) light JC 75 - 95
    3. 4 sets of heavy shrugs 485
    4. reverse hypers (3x10)
    5. abs; banded pulldowns

    TUESDAY
    1. Inclined bench press: 3 sets of 5 Tom 207.5
    2. Bench press: 4 sets; 2x 5, 232.5, add 50#: 2 sets of 2
    3. 5 sets of 10 Hanging rows
    4. Barbell curls: 4 sets of 8
    Conditioning (second session)
    sled pull 2 miles; 20, 0 (and six 50-yard runs)

    THURSDAY
    1. Deadlift: work up to a set of 2* reps Tom 507.5
    2. Deadlift: back off sets - 90% of top set; 2 sets of same* reps Tom 450
    3. Squats: (90% of Monday’s weight) 2 sets of 5, 350; 2 sets of 3 with chains 360
    4. Reverse Hypers (3x10)
    5. abs: hollow rockers

    FRIDAY
    1. Inclined Bench Press: (10 sets of 3) Tom 137.5 with chains
    2. Press: 4 sets Tom 167.5 - 187.5
    3. Pull ups (5x10)
    4. Barbell curls: 4 sets of 8
    5. 3 sets kettlebell sit ups

    SATURDAY - Conditioning
    swim 1 mile

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