Risk of rhabdomyolysis Risk of rhabdomyolysis

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Thread: Risk of rhabdomyolysis

  1. #1
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    Aug 2017
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    Default Risk of rhabdomyolysis

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    I was following a program that had me do 6 pull-ups and 10 chin-ups per week. I recently switched to a program that I do between 25-50 pull-ups/week with any and all grips I want only on Tuesdays. I decided to do the 50 reps to get more volume in for more strength and size. I recently learned about rhabdomyolysis. I donít know much about it, but does raising the volume from 16 (6 on Tuesday and 10 on Friday) to 50 put me at risk of getting it? Along with that for several months now Iíve been doing around 10 reps a day just to get stronger and better at them. All of this is bodyweight no added weight and only assistance when I canít do any more bodyweight. Last week I did 28 bodyweight and 23 with very little assistance. Thanks for the help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlifter View Post
    I was following a program that had me do 6 pull-ups and 10 chin-ups per week. I recently switched to a program that I do between 25-50 pull-ups/week with any and all grips I want only on Tuesdays. I decided to do the 50 reps to get more volume in for more strength and size. I recently learned about rhabdomyolysis. I don’t know much about it, but does raising the volume from 16 (6 on Tuesday and 10 on Friday) to 50 put me at risk of getting it? Along with that for several months now I’ve been doing around 10 reps a day just to get stronger and better at them. All of this is bodyweight no added weight and only assistance when I can’t do any more bodyweight. Last week I did 28 bodyweight and 23 with very little assistance. Thanks for the help.
    almost zero chance

  3. #3
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    Jan 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlifter View Post
    I was following a program that had me do 6 pull-ups and 10 chin-ups per week. I recently switched to a program that I do between 25-50 pull-ups/week with any and all grips I want only on Tuesdays. I decided to do the 50 reps to get more volume in for more strength and size. I recently learned about rhabdomyolysis. I don’t know much about it, but does raising the volume from 16 (6 on Tuesday and 10 on Friday) to 50 put me at risk of getting it? Along with that for several months now I’ve been doing around 10 reps a day just to get stronger and better at them. All of this is bodyweight no added weight and only assistance when I can’t do any more bodyweight. Last week I did 28 bodyweight and 23 with very little assistance. Thanks for the help.
    Are you fucking kidding me.

  4. #4
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    Jul 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlifter View Post
    I recently learned about rhabdomyolysis. I don’t know much about it,
    ??

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
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    I can't say about rhabdomyolysis, but pull ups made me incontinent. After switching from 30,000 band and machine assisted pullups a week to 1 kipping pullup a week, my bladder can no longer control itself. The mainstream fitness media, as well as starting strength make no mention of these life-changing risks inherent in the pullup - it would therefore not surprise me to learn that pullups do indeed lead to kidney failure.

  6. #6
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    Colorado
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    Quote Originally Posted by Britbong View Post
    I can't say about rhabdomyolysis, but pull ups made me incontinent. After switching from 30,000 band and machine assisted pullups a week to 1 kipping pullup a week, my bladder can no longer control itself. The mainstream fitness media, as well as starting strength make no mention of these life-changing risks inherent in the pullup - it would therefore not surprise me to learn that pullups do indeed lead to kidney failure.
    I did notice the other day your urine looked just like the tea I drink.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
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    Yes, the risk is real. That's why entering every gym on the planet has you walk by a memorial for the fallen and pay your respects before attempting any form of anything. Please be careful out there.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Britbong View Post
    I can't say about rhabdomyolysis, but pull ups made me incontinent. After switching from 30,000 band and machine assisted pullups a week to 1 kipping pullup a week, my bladder can no longer control itself. The mainstream fitness media, as well as starting strength make no mention of these life-changing risks inherent in the pullup - it would therefore not surprise me to learn that pullups do indeed lead to kidney failure.
    Ironically, once you become incontinent you have to WEAR the Pull-Ups.

  9. #9
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    Aug 2017
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    Colorado
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfsully View Post
    Ironically, once you become incontinent you have to WEAR the Pull-Ups.
    Can I start with some assistance bands and work my way up?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    32

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    starting strength coach development program
    You will die.

    Not from this.

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