Partial peroneal tendon tear Partial peroneal tendon tear

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Thread: Partial peroneal tendon tear

  1. #1
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    Default Partial peroneal tendon tear

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    My question: How would a partial peroneal tendon tear affect ability/risk of doing SS movements like squats and deadlifts?

    Background: My recent and current diagnosis is a possible partial tear of the longus peroneal tendon. The doctor actually isnít sure, because he canít tell from the MRI where/what type of tear. It originally happened 7 months ago, and after three cortisone shots in three different spots hasnít really gotten any better. If I get surgery, Iíd be looking at 1 month in a cast, plus three months of basically doing nothing that requires my legs to do anything, so Iím holding off for now in the hopes that itíll improve (plus I have things to do this summer which requires me being ambulatory). Iím scheduled for another MRI in two months. I asked my doctor about working out, and what he basically said was that as long as the motion doesnít involve a lot of acceleration or shocks (i.e. jumps, running etc. ) squats and deadlifts would probably be fine.

    I came across this thread which deals with tendonisis/-osis chronic inflammation Would this cover partial tendon tears as well? Iím not exactly an advanced lifter, basically my 5RM for squats is 85kg and 95kg for deadlifts, BW 65kg Ė would I be delaying healing or courting disaster and making things worse by doing them? (I do bent over rows instead of power cleans.) Any other advice?

  2. #2
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    You let a "doctor" put a cortisone shot into a suspected partially-torn tendon? Without a diagnosis? Three times? I'm afraid you fucked up.

  3. #3
    Ray Gillenwater's Avatar
    Ray Gillenwater is offline Administrator, Starting Strength Gyms
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    Not surprising. These mistakes seem to be common. For example, I'm aware of several athletes that have had sulfa based antibiotics prescribed (which weaken tendons) after it was made clear that the person lifted heavy weights and was physically active (professional athletes in some cases).

    I personally had a misdiagnosis of a knee injury. The doctor assured me the image showed no signs of a meniscus tear. Turns out the image was taken incorrectly and I had a bucket handle tear - which explained my knee locking intermittently. To add insult to injury, PT was prescribed for post op. I went three or four times out of curiosity. The PT had trouble explaining how his single leg balancing exercises on a bosu ball were going to "strengthen" my leg.

    And my mother's doctor diagnosed her with diverticulitis after a short conversation with her GP and no scope. It was (not surprisingly) a misdiagnosis.

    This is a tough situation to be in as a patient. I'm not sure what the right solution is, but personally, if the issue is high stakes and the risk of waiting for a second diagnosis is low, I always opt for a second opinion while seeking advice from experts in my personal network. Situations like this make it clear that fully trusting one medical professional with the diagnosis and treatment of a serious, non life-threatening problem, can be a mistake.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    You let a "doctor" put a cortisone shot into a suspected partially-torn tendon? Without a diagnosis? Three times? I'm afraid you fucked up.
    The initial (mis)diagnosis after two months from the injury was that it was related to congenital partial bone loss in the foot, leading to loose ligaments. A couple of months later the same doctor gave me an updated tendonitis diagnosis, which is when I got the three shots, spaced two weeks apart, in different places. I've actually held off on heavy squats and deadlifts during that period, just doing bar only or 30kg, or even just skipped it entirely.

    So umm.. how fucked am I really? And any suggestions for what activities to do/avoid?

  5. #5
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    You said: "My recent and current diagnosis is a possible partial tear of the longus peroneal tendon." And now I have no idea what has happened. Good luck with your training.

  6. #6
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    starting strength coach development program
    Basically after those three shots I asked to get an MRI - took MRI to get a second opinion, partial tear diagnosed.

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