Lifting through a pinched nerve Lifting through a pinched nerve

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Thread: Lifting through a pinched nerve

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
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    Default Lifting through a pinched nerve

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    About a month ago was lifting bags of gravel doing yard work....new cement padio blocks. Was using primarily right arm...already have an old neck injury from motorcycle accident over 25 yrs ago. Next day went to do sqauts and deads..the following day severe pain down right arm from neck. Pt gave me some good stretches that helped the pain. Doctor said I have swollen discs and dont worry about it..however I complained more and I am getting an Xray this week and waiting for MRI to follow...2 week wait.Going to a neck specialist too!?!....I doubt he/she lifts.
    I am most concerned because I have defenitely lost some strength in right arm...can feel it is mostly tricep area, bench and press down significantly. Doing some traction at home...(over the door traction device) seems to help some. I think I have C5 and 6 issue..thumb and forefinger tingling. Squats feel good..sometimes deads cause some pain up around right side trap area. Wondering....should I keep lifting through this doing what I can? Lighten the load ?(yeah its already light I know!! I do my best. Doc said it will go away on its own...told me to take it easy! Do not want to stop my lifts..... Any advice much appreciated.
    PS I was hoping to get my sqaut up to 205 and deads in that range too before this happened!

    Thank you kindly...

    Age 55 yrs old today!!
    Body weight 176 at 5"9
    Squat before injury 180lbs 3X5
    Deads 165 X5
    Bench 150 3X5
    Press 85 3X5

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    348

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    what's your head doing during your lifts?
    is that tennis ball under your chin?
    or are you bobbing your head up to the ceiling?
    video of squat, dead, and press.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Olympia, WA
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    1,839

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Cashmore View Post
    About a month ago was lifting bags of gravel doing yard work....new cement padio blocks. Was using primarily right arm...already have an old neck injury from motorcycle accident over 25 yrs ago. Next day went to do sqauts and deads..the following day severe pain down right arm from neck. Pt gave me some good stretches that helped the pain. Doctor said I have swollen discs and dont worry about it..however I complained more and I am getting an Xray this week and waiting for MRI to follow...2 week wait.Going to a neck specialist too!?!....I doubt he/she lifts.
    I am most concerned because I have defenitely lost some strength in right arm...can feel it is mostly tricep area, bench and press down significantly. Doing some traction at home...(over the door traction device) seems to help some. I think I have C5 and 6 issue..thumb and forefinger tingling. Squats feel good..sometimes deads cause some pain up around right side trap area. Wondering....should I keep lifting through this doing what I can? Lighten the load ?(yeah its already light I know!! I do my best. Doc said it will go away on its own...told me to take it easy! Do not want to stop my lifts..... Any advice much appreciated.
    PS I was hoping to get my sqaut up to 205 and deads in that range too before this happened!

    Thank you kindly...

    Age 55 yrs old today!!
    Body weight 176 at 5"9
    Squat before injury 180lbs 3X5
    Deads 165 X5
    Bench 150 3X5
    Press 85 3X5
    What is "down significantly here"? So, I realize you are in a different medical system than the US, but what would you expect to get from an MRI and seeing a neck specialist other than surgery? Any other intervention, outside epidural steroid injections, can be handled by an intermediate provider. Pain radiating down the arm is not an indication for an MRI, or referral to a neck specialist. Weakness in the triceps MAY be an indication, but it would have to be found along with other physical exam findings. It would appear your physician was not concerned about the physical exam findings but then you say you basically "complained more" to force him to order more imaging. Why was this necessary? If you felt the physician was grossly incompetent, that may be fair, however, a physician making an educated clinical decision to not "over treat" you for a routine complaint is not negligence.

    You keep mentioning the accident from 25 years ago. This is a mindset that isn't likely to be beneficial to you. It has almost certainly ZERO to do with your current situation. Many people over the age of 50 have neck pain. Many have radicular pain. Not everyone had motorcycle accident.

    As stated on other threads, I find reducing the in-set volume is very appropriate here. For cervical radiculopathy / suspected cervical radiculopathy cases, holding a small tennis ball / nerf ball / rolled wash cloth under the chin during the set is extremely helpful. Fatigue is your enemy during the set. If we are to assume the absolute worst (herniated disc causing mass effect on the C7 nerve), working into fatigue is potentially bad news. Keep the in set volume low. Keep the weight as high as you can manage. Maintain good cervical spine posture awareness.

  4. #4
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    Jul 2017
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    Thank you kindly; I actually am glad you mentioned mind set too! I often think all my aches and pains are the result of the old cycle accident. I will get the nerf ball and start using this.
    Thank you for the info.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Cashmore View Post
    Thank you kindly; I actually am glad you mentioned mind set too! I often think all my aches and pains are the result of the old cycle accident. I will get the nerf ball and start using this.
    Thank you for the info.
    When you have been through trauma, it is very easy to blame this on the previous trauma. In fact, research into pain neuroscience and pain psychology suggests this is likely an evolutionary defense mechanism.

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