Reoccurring tendinitis in shoulder when benching Reoccurring tendinitis in shoulder when benching - Page 2

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Thread: Reoccurring tendinitis in shoulder when benching

  1. #11
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    Default Rehab faster than expected. THANKS!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    You are certainly welcome, sir. Please keep us updated with your progress.
    Hey Will. Following your advice paid off big time. Today I benched 60kg for the first time since the injury, and I was feeling okay, so I figured I'll update with a video benching 65. Feeling embarrassed posting such a light lift I put 70kg on the bar...



    That felt lighter than I expected, so I surprised myself with the following set of 80kg. On the fourth rep I was getting shaky, so I just put the bar down.



    I was beginning to lose hope of recovering until I got your advice. Thanks so much. Any more tips would be greatly appreciated. All the best

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yonason Herschlag View Post
    Hey Will. Following your advice paid off big time. Today I benched 60kg for the first time since the injury, and I was feeling okay, so I figured I'll update with a video benching 65. Feeling embarrassed posting such a light lift I put 70kg on the bar...



    That felt lighter than I expected, so I surprised myself with the following set of 80kg. On the fourth rep I was getting shaky, so I just put the bar down.



    I was beginning to lose hope of recovering until I got your advice. Thanks so much. Any more tips would be greatly appreciated. All the best
    Yonason, those look 1,000x better. Fantastic work. Only big thing I see here is your bench is too tall for you. You may need to think about placing a bumper plate on the ground beside both sides of the bench and place your feet on them. That will artificially shorten the bench and give you more ability to drive with your legs.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    Yonason, those look 1,000x better. Fantastic work. Only big thing I see here is your bench is too tall for you. You may need to think about placing a bumper plate on the ground beside both sides of the bench and place your feet on them. That will artificially shorten the bench and give you more ability to drive with your legs.
    Quite a sharp eye you have there Will! I just measured the height of my bench; 19.5 inches, with the top 1.7 inches being of foam. And I see that Mark Rippetoe designed his bench to be 17 inches.

    How much do you think putting bumper plates under my feet can help? (how much more can I expect to lift with that boost?) (and does the current height have any effect on the lack of stability in my lift that aggravates the tendinitis?)

    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    "Only big thing I see here is your bench is too tall for you."
    And the little things?

  4. #14
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    Default Progress update

    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    Yonason, those look 1,000x better. Fantastic work. Only big thing I see here is your bench is too tall for you. You may need to think about placing a bumper plate on the ground beside both sides of the bench and place your feet on them. That will artificially shorten the bench and give you more ability to drive with your legs.
    Hi Will. Here's a progress report 19 days after your last tip. I've been using plates under my feet when benching and it has helped me to gain stability under my shoulders with the legs pushing into position. Progress is slow, I'm only up to 85kg 19 days later, however, 19 days ago I was shaking after one set of 80kg. Today after a set of 80, I followed with three sets of 85kg. I am not maxing out 3X/wk, but rather one day heavy, and the next workout light (for recovery). I also sometimes do inclined presses instead of flat bench presses on my light days.

    Here's today's first set of 85kg. I'd be interested in your feedback on technique and programming.


  5. #15
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    Default Progress update

    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    Yonason, those look 1,000x better. Fantastic work. Only big thing I see here is your bench is too tall for you. You may need to think about placing a bumper plate on the ground beside both sides of the bench and place your feet on them. That will artificially shorten the bench and give you more ability to drive with your legs.
    The plates have added some stability to my benching. I'm up to three sets of 85kg now, 19 days since the previous video.



    Any further feedback would be appreciated.

    Today I just got results from bone-scanning testing as degenerative arthritis, specifically in the shoulders, acromion, D4, L3, right knee, and left leg big toe. What are your recommendations regarding dealing with mild degenerative arthritis at my age (55)?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yonason Herschlag View Post

    Today I just got results from bone-scanning testing as degenerative arthritis, specifically in the shoulders, acromion, D4, L3, right knee, and left leg big toe. What are your recommendations regarding dealing with mild degenerative arthritis at my age (55)?
    Do these radiologic findings surprise you? I actually provided quite a few recommendations regarding dealing with mild to moderate arthritis at last year's SSCAC. The videos are posted on this site, and it would also be very beneficial to you to watch Dr. Jonathan Sullivan's presentation on the pathology of arthropathies from the same conference.

  7. #17
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    Hi Will,
    Here's the update:
    Slow continued progress on benching, now up to 90kg 3X5. I went to an orthopedic doctor who injected something into my shoulder that has also helped. He sent me for CT of the lumbar region, and I just got the CT report a few minutes ago. I won't see the doctor for a few weeks, so I'd appreciate if you could explain to me what the report means; plus I need your advice regarding lifting with such a condition. The report is in Hebrew, so I am just translating it as best I can:

    "L3-4 posterior disc protrusion pressing on the thecal sac
    L4-5 posterior disc protrusion pressing on the thecal sac"

    Would this explain pain in my right hip after deadlifting? And why? And how should I program my deadlifting and squats with this condition?

  8. #18
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    Hey Yonason, Will will be back on the boards in a couple of weeks and I've been subbing in. I think the posterior disc protrusions most likely have little to nothing to do with the pain you are experiencing in your right hip after deadlift. It has been my experience that the aches and pains that emerge following training have much more to do with things like your program, immediate training history (how fast have you been progressing yourself), the other stressors going on in your life and how you are performing the deadlift. Programming is not based off the of MRI results. What matters much more are things like what your current program is, your immediate (last 4 weeks) training history, and the pattern of your clinical symptoms.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick D'Agostino View Post
    Hey Yonason, Will will be back on the boards in a couple of weeks and I've been subbing in. I think the posterior disc protrusions most likely have little to nothing to do with the pain you are experiencing in your right hip after deadlift. It has been my experience that the aches and pains that emerge following training have much more to do with things like your program, immediate training history (how fast have you been progressing yourself), the other stressors going on in your life and how you are performing the deadlift. Programming is not based off the of MRI results. What matters much more are things like what your current program is, your immediate (last 4 weeks) training history, and the pattern of your clinical symptoms.
    Hey Nick,
    Thanks for your feedback. I started lifting 6.5 years ago. It was only after a year of being in the gym that I read Starting Strength and began focusing on power lifting. I over trained in the very beginning causing tendonitis in the shoulders that limited my progress in the bench for years. About a year ago I reached these PRs at age 55
    Squat 170kg x1 or 160kg 3x3
    DL 235kg
    BP 120kg x3
    I made those PRs with a body fat percentage of over 25%. With the last couple years not able to get my blood pressure to where it should be, Iíve been focused on losing weight. Since May 2019 I got down from 107kg to 99kg.

    Since being on a calorie deficient diet wonít allow recovery from heavy lifting at age 55 (actually just turned 56 last week), Iíve been lifting light 2-3 times per week. I deadlift heavy about once a month, struggling to pull 200kg. After losing strength in squatting, I recently took a little break from cutting, and built up my squat back to 3x5 @140kg. Iíve been trying to bench heavy once a week lately getting back up to 3x5 @90kg, recovering from a relapse of the tendonitis.

    Unfortunately I canít give you clear details of my workout schedule. A recent heavy lifting day was: Squats 140kg 3x5, BP 90kg 3x5, chin-ups 3x5 + 4x4 (31 total) @100kg, additionally in that workout I did some light standing presses 20kg, plus isolation exercises on bicep and tricep + chest flys and machine rows. A typical light day would be similar exercises at lighter weights, and likely an incline BP @60kg 4x8 instead of the regular bench.

    At age 56, I am not progressing beyond my PRs. Iíve been recovering from a relapse of tendonitis and with Willís advice I have been progressing in that recovery. Regarding squats and deadlifts, as I am trying to lose weight, I am trying to minimize strength loss by regularly squatting light one or two times a week, and going heavy on occasion when taking a break from cutting.

    I have definitely had good progress recovering with the BP, and I am benching more weight with less pain. The hip pain was a totally new thing for me never experienced before and it concerned me and my future of squatting and deadlifting, therefore I went for some testing. My questions about the hip is if the source of the pain is the hip itself Ė is it a bone/cartilage/joint problem, or is it stemming from the disc protrusions, and how will that affect my ability to squat and DL.

    Without professional advice, my plan is to continue squatting light 1-2 X/wk, going heavy on occasion, and DL heavy about 1x/mo and light 1x/mo, all the while trying to lose another 5-10kg while working upper body 2-3 x/wk including 1x/wk heavy.

    Sorry for the long and winding answer. Perhaps Iíll get back to keeping records, and Iíll get back to you a month from now with a clearer and shorter answer.

  10. #20
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    Hey Yonason, when a contributor to pain is an impinged nerve, people usually use words like sharp, numb, tingling, shooting, radiating, and electrical to describe their experience. If it is a dull achy pain that is appearing after you lift and lingering, it means you have to alter the program to manage better the fatigue generated in the session.

    The idea I'm trying to push you away from is that the pain has an exact "cause" or "source." In cases like this, there is no one source. It is better to think of pain emerging from a bunch of contributing factors. Some of these may include sleep, life stressors, and your beliefs about what pain means. Also, I believe it is better to focus on things you can control, like the above variables and training variables, than things you can't like anatomy. If you want to feel better quickly, you should take action on all of these fronts simultaneously (fishing with a net is more effective than fishing with a pole). What is going on with your biology is just one small piece of the pie. Most of the time, in these types of situations, focusing on what might be the biological contributing factor makes things take longer.

    My first suggestion would be to increase the deadlift frequency to once per week. You can still keep the once a month heavy plan. There is a good chance that what you are experiencing may be related to DOMs because the frequency is too low. The repeated bout effect is not protecting you. Also, when you do decide to go heavy, use either a ramp up to a top set or a top set a backoff style of loading. Sets across with a max weight may be generating more fatigue than you can currently quickly recover. As things improve and your training becomes more structured and regular, you can go back to using heavy sets across. I hope some of these suggestions help!

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