Help for me sacrum. Help for me sacrum.

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Thread: Help for me sacrum.

  1. #1
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    Default Help for me sacrum.

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    Hi, lifters ! First of all, congratulations on your work that makes newbies like me learn so much, thanks for that.

    Well, straight to my question:

    I have been doing the first PPST program seriously for about 6 weeks (although I had previously done "lift training") and I think it was going very well until last friday I curved my lumbar spine in one of the press series and I was left with some pain until the deadlift warmed up, during which the discomfort disappeared completely. I have realized that I have trouble "handling" my lumbar spine (I have read Rip's article about this and I have to do the tests he recommends there). BUT the problem is not over there: Yesterday, during the last series of press I did not bend the lumbar spine but I felt like it was "loaded" too much and struggled to remain stable. I finished the series without discomfort, but the real problem began when I started warming up deadlift: In the first series (60 kg) I felt nothing, but in the second (90 kg) my sacrum was "locked" before I could take off the ground bar and I had to sit a few minutes. The pain was not "immense", but it did force me to sit for a few minutes. Already at home, it was hard for me to bend down to pick something up. Today I woke up with the same level of pain and used the only anti-inflammatory in my house: Diclofenac 75 mg. Now it is night and I notice that the discomfort has decreased by 80%, I can already touch my toes while standing, although I still have a slight discomfort and the sacrum "sounds" sometimes (softly).

    MY QUESTION: What is the protocol you use for such a problem? Whether physical therapy, such as the type of analgesic, etc. And, if I continue with "little pain," when could I resume the deadlift?

    Sorry for the size of the text, I wanted to be specific. We are in crisis here and medicine and medicines are very expensive.

    MY DATA:

    Age: 26 years old
    Training: I have been doing the PPST "seriously" for 6 weeks
    Height: 6 foots
    Weight: 225 pounds.

    THANK YOU FOR READING.

  2. #2
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    Aug 2010
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    Olympia, WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernLifter View Post
    Hi, lifters ! First of all, congratulations on your work that makes newbies like me learn so much, thanks for that.

    Well, straight to my question:

    I have been doing the first PPST program seriously for about 6 weeks (although I had previously done "lift training") and I think it was going very well until last friday I curved my lumbar spine in one of the press series and I was left with some pain until the deadlift warmed up, during which the discomfort disappeared completely. I have realized that I have trouble "handling" my lumbar spine (I have read Rip's article about this and I have to do the tests he recommends there). BUT the problem is not over there: Yesterday, during the last series of press I did not bend the lumbar spine but I felt like it was "loaded" too much and struggled to remain stable. I finished the series without discomfort, but the real problem began when I started warming up deadlift: In the first series (60 kg) I felt nothing, but in the second (90 kg) my sacrum was "locked" before I could take off the ground bar and I had to sit a few minutes. The pain was not "immense", but it did force me to sit for a few minutes. Already at home, it was hard for me to bend down to pick something up. Today I woke up with the same level of pain and used the only anti-inflammatory in my house: Diclofenac 75 mg. Now it is night and I notice that the discomfort has decreased by 80%, I can already touch my toes while standing, although I still have a slight discomfort and the sacrum "sounds" sometimes (softly).

    MY QUESTION: What is the protocol you use for such a problem? Whether physical therapy, such as the type of analgesic, etc. And, if I continue with "little pain," when could I resume the deadlift?

    Sorry for the size of the text, I wanted to be specific. We are in crisis here and medicine and medicines are very expensive.

    MY DATA:

    Age: 26 years old
    Training: I have been doing the PPST "seriously" for 6 weeks
    Height: 6 foots
    Weight: 225 pounds.

    THANK YOU FOR READING.
    Maintain solid form. Get back into training, as long as you are comfortable with assuming the risk, and slow the movements down to ensure control over the movement.

    The fact that you have had a marked improvement should be telling that this is not serious. Physical therapy will be generally a waste of your time if you are already utilizing a properly programmed strength and conditioning program.

  3. #3
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    May 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    Maintain solid form. Get back into training, as long as you are comfortable with assuming the risk, and slow the movements down to ensure control over the movement.

    The fact that you have had a marked improvement should be telling that this is not serious. Physical therapy will be generally a waste of your time if you are already utilizing a properly programmed strength and conditioning program.
    Thank you very much for taking the time to answer me. Then, the logic indicates to return to the training with care of the movements and to work in the form of the lumbar spine. Just to keep it in mind; Is the sacrum pain from curving the spine due to the iliac sacral joint? It is curious, because without too much pain, it prevents standing up...

    Has anyone had a similar experience????

    I simply hope that with conscientious work this disappears. Thanks again!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernLifter View Post

    Has anyone had a similar experience????
    I have thousands of hours of experience with situations eerily similar to this. This is what I do in my professional life, every single day of my life.

    If your pain is centered on the SI joints, there are only a couple of things that could be causing it. For one, the sacroiliac joints are virtually immovable, so the idea that your SI joints are misaligned is an archaic "pseudo-diagnosis", however, this does not prevent manual manipulation of the SI joints from being an effective treatment strategy for sacroiliac pain. The SI joints are also in the vicinity of the glute max proximal insertion. If you are, indeed, performing the squat / deadlift with poor form, gluteus maximus tendon pain would be a differential diagnosis. Inflammatory sacroiliitis might also be a differential if you were having constitutional symptoms. Ankylosing spondylitis begins in the SI joints with a bout of sacroiliitis, however, the presentation of AS is classically reported as being stiffness > pain, especially pain with prolonged static posture or when asleep, and it is better with exercise. From what you report, it seems to be musculoskeletal, and generally speaking, musculoskeletal conditions are best treated with graded, progressive activity.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    I have thousands of hours of experience with situations eerily similar to this. This is what I do in my professional life, every single day of my life.

    If your pain is centered on the SI joints, there are only a couple of things that could be causing it. For one, the sacroiliac joints are virtually immovable, so the idea that your SI joints are misaligned is an archaic "pseudo-diagnosis", however, this does not prevent manual manipulation of the SI joints from being an effective treatment strategy for sacroiliac pain. The SI joints are also in the vicinity of the glute max proximal insertion. If you are, indeed, performing the squat / deadlift with poor form, gluteus maximus tendon pain would be a differential diagnosis. Inflammatory sacroiliitis might also be a differential if you were having constitutional symptoms. Ankylosing spondylitis begins in the SI joints with a bout of sacroiliitis, however, the presentation of AS is classically reported as being stiffness > pain, especially pain with prolonged static posture or when asleep, and it is better with exercise. From what you report, it seems to be musculoskeletal, and generally speaking, musculoskeletal conditions are best treated with graded, progressive activity.
    THAT exactly what happens to me.

    I've been resting since Wednesday, I thought it was prudent. But I'm a little disappointed because that "20%" of trouble is still there. The discomfort that still persists is located in the insertion of the buttock, specifically. But hey, I will follow his advice to cure him with gradual and progressive activity. Thank you very much for your help, it is truly very valuable.

  6. #6
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    To cure it* (sorry, my english is too bad).

  7. #7
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    If you think you meet the New York criteria for ankylosing spondylitis, I'd highly suggest making an appointment with your general practitioner. AS typically requires treatment with Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    If you think you meet the New York criteria for ankylosing spondylitis, I'd highly suggest making an appointment with your general practitioner. AS typically requires treatment with Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs.
    Yes. I have to go with a doctor. Thanks!

  9. #9
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    I don't think I have ankylosing spondylitis, because I have had several MRIs for other reasons. But without hesitation I will see a doctor.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernLifter View Post
    I don't think I have ankylosing spondylitis, because I have had several MRIs for other reasons. But without hesitation I will see a doctor.
    An MRI will show sacroiliitis which can be indicative of AS. If you do not meet the New York Criteria for AS and you just have a little low back pain and stiffness, it isn't likely you need to see a physician. Since you are someone over the internet and I am, too, just someone on the internet, I'd have to suggest a competent physical examination by a medical provider.

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