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Thread: Progression following injuries

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    Default Progression following injuries

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    I am just starting back exercising following a couple long and Chronic injuries. Almost two years ago I had rotator cuff injuries or impingement to both shoulders. The injuries were so bad that I could barely lift any weight above my head. A year later I tore my posterior tibial tendon which pretty much stopped any exercise. A year later I feel well enough to work out but still have some pain and awareness of both the shoulders as well as the ankle.
    I am starting my third week of the SSLP but instead of rapidly ramping up the weight I decided I would progress slower giving time to strengthen the shoulders and ankle and also work on improving technique as well as giving time for the accessory muscles to get used to doing the work. I am also using this time to try and cut some fat to make some room to add some lean muscle in a few weeks/months.
    As an older male (Iíll be 49 next week), I am concerned about injuries and not being able to exercise. Will the SS program help develop the correct muscles to prevent a recurrence of my shoulder impingement (i.e. lats, rotator cuff and accessory muscles) or should I program in additional accessory exercises to help strengthen these muscles? I lift with orthotics in my shoes in order to lessen the stress on my PTT, I donít have pain with squatting but I do have minimal soreness after a workout. Should I add another exercise to strengthen it as well?
    In terms of progression am I leaving too much on the table by not ramping up faster?
    Thanks for your responses. I appreciate your insight.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    South Korea
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    2,291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NCRob View Post
    I am just starting back exercising following a couple long and Chronic injuries. Almost two years ago I had rotator cuff injuries or impingement to both shoulders. The injuries were so bad that I could barely lift any weight above my head. A year later I tore my posterior tibial tendon which pretty much stopped any exercise. A year later I feel well enough to work out but still have some pain and awareness of both the shoulders as well as the ankle.
    I am starting my third week of the SSLP but instead of rapidly ramping up the weight I decided I would progress slower giving time to strengthen the shoulders and ankle and also work on improving technique as well as giving time for the accessory muscles to get used to doing the work. I am also using this time to try and cut some fat to make some room to add some lean muscle in a few weeks/months.
    As an older male (I’ll be 49 next week), I am concerned about injuries and not being able to exercise. Will the SS program help develop the correct muscles to prevent a recurrence of my shoulder impingement (i.e. lats, rotator cuff and accessory muscles) or should I program in additional accessory exercises to help strengthen these muscles? I lift with orthotics in my shoes in order to lessen the stress on my PTT, I don’t have pain with squatting but I do have minimal soreness after a workout. Should I add another exercise to strengthen it as well?
    In terms of progression am I leaving too much on the table by not ramping up faster?
    Thanks for your responses. I appreciate your insight.
    1) Performed correctly, you shouldn't need to even think about accessory lifts until you are way down the road into your progression. Nothing is going to cause the necessary adaptation like thoughtfully performed bench, press, squats, and deadlifts.
    2) You should be concerned about not exercising. Injuries happen. Get comfortable with the idea of being uncomfortable when you train. I wish reality was different. There are very few injuries that necessitate ceasing training. There will be plenty of times you limp into the gym, have crushing back pain, shoulder pain, etc. You still train, thoughtfully, of course.
    3) As a 49 year old man, you can make your own decision about how fast to ramp up, but I would suggest, if you haven't had an unwanted side effect from progressing as prescribed, it would be worth giving the normal progression a go. Getting stronger = good. Getting generally strong = good-er than getting better at isolation exercises. Don't worry about weird isolation exercises for the Tibialis Posterior.

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