High School Deadlift Injury/The Government Schools High School Deadlift Injury/The Government Schools - Page 5

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Thread: High School Deadlift Injury/The Government Schools

  1. #41
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    • wichita falls texas june seminar date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nockian View Post
    "They need to interact with other children" is such a croc. Children do that anyway. The quality learning time is spent with adults and children are like enormous sponges for facts, information and skills.
    Facts

    Quote Originally Posted by Nockian View Post
    Why any parent would stick their most precious possession into a Government institution on the proviso that 'mixing with other kids' made them better at life, is beyond me.
    They/we don't. We send them to school because we have to work to pay the bills. Not so they could play with other kids.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nockian View Post
    I've learned far more since I left school, than I ever did when I was there..
    We all have. The system sucks.
    Last edited by Nick Delgadillo; 01-30-2020 at 06:05 PM. Reason: missing quote tag

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Delgadillo View Post
    I'
    The homeschool kids who are socially awkward have socially awkward parents. Putting them in school doesn't make them not socially awkward, it makes them able to function in the make-believe social structure that is school. That hardly means the socially awkward kids are thriving.
    Spot on Nick! I wish I could have home schooled my 3 kids. We unfortunately could not due to circumstances. We did however makes sure they learned to interact with adults early in life. Anything public school taught that was garbage we made sure to clarify and correct for the kids at night. I have quite a few friends with kids that are homeschooled and they are all great productive members of society that interact better than most. Even as little kids they would hold conversation with me as an adult that was better than most adults while giving me eye contact.

    Of course if a parent chooses to home school they have to shoulder that responsibility and make sure to always take a pulse and not just let the kids hang out and watch TV all day. I have unfortunately seen this before as well.

    I will say however that I do like technical high schools if your child is interested. All of my kids went to a technical high school in CT and all have worked in their trade with success. My oldest got a free ride to UCONN because of her grades and her trade. My youngest, my son is almost a foreman, already running a machine shop at only 21 making a great honest wage and loves it. Couple that with the fact that he has no college debt like most kids today.

    I think when it comes down to it, no matter what choice is made the parents have to be involved as much as possible. Otherwise society will mold the kids for youand not dor the better.

    P.S. my son has asked me, at the know it all age of 21 to train him on starting strength. I guess I did something right :-)

    Sparky

    Quote Originally Posted by FatButWeak View Post
    I'm not having some lesbian/vegan/wiccan teach my kids that they have to "respect" xir mental disorders.
    you made me choke on my evening brew while reading this.
    Sparky

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Delgadillo View Post
    I don't think it's a viable solution for everyone. The point is that if people can and are willing, they should. If people want to and can't for whatever reasons, they should fix up their lives so that they can. There's not a whole lot much more important going on in most peoples' lives for the next 10 years or so. I've known people who wanted to homeschool but didn't out of fear that they'd "do it wrong." So these folks should be encouraged.

    What definitely also isn't a viable solution is what's going on now. A good start might be having schools compete for enrollments. That could immediately solve some problems.
    It was certainly a hard financial burden to go from a two income family down to one. We took deliberate steps to allow us the opportunity to homeschool our children. Certainly, some families are in a much worse financial situation and canít, just like the vast majority of people probably donít want to homeschool their children.

    The argument that special needs children canít gain access to things like OT/PT/SLP is hogwash. Those resources are available in the local school district that the homeschool parents live in. State testing is exactly the same. Athletics is the only thing that school districts routinely deny homeschooled children.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by bracemaker View Post
    Kudos to you Will for doing it right.
    I know the above is shorthand, but let's take a shot at specifics (Will won't mind):

    Kudos to Mrs. Morris.

    Homeschooling doesn't work unless both are completely invested. And it can get overwhelming for the one who primarily implements the "home" part.

  5. #45
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    Screen Shot 2020-01-30 at 8.04.48 PM.jpg

    (https://twitter.com/michaelmalice/st...401345?lang=en)

    Homeschooling isn't an option for everyone, certainly not without some big trade-offs. But unless you're still inside the echo-chamber, its impossible not to see the nefarious effects that government schools have had on so-called education.

    Related, an ex-girlfriend of mine is a high school teacher in the NYC public school system. I got an inside look at how the system works, and it's every bit as ugly as you'd expect. From my tax dollars going to mandatory social justice training (indoctrination) for the teachers, to allowing the most disruptive kids to get away with it and completely ruin everyone else's experience and stunt their learning because graduation rates are what gets the school better marks and more funding, hearing about how the sausage is made was even more frustrating than I could have imagined.

    All it really takes to realize something is very wrong is the most basic observation: How many little kids do you know who are not immensely curious about the world around them? They endlessly ask questions and are inquisitive and want to learn and explore. All it takes to kill their curiosity and thirst for learning is a few years in school.
    YT * IG * FB

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by VNV View Post
    I know the above is shorthand, but let's take a shot at specifics (Will won't mind):

    Kudos to Mrs. Morris.

    Homeschooling doesn't work unless both are completely invested. And it can get overwhelming for the one who primarily implements the "home" part.
    My wife is the one who deserves all the credit. I married far outside of my pay grade.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shea Frazier View Post
    How many public school teachers do you know? How many have to taken the time to sit down and speak with?
    We all know lots of them, because there are lots of them to know.

    Students with special needs who are being homeschooled, in many cases, lose access to the following FREE services - occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy, assistive technology, ABA, etc. They also no longer are able to access free standardized diagnostic assessments in the areas of reading, written language, mathematics, adaptive skills, etc.
    FREE doesn't exist, as all adults know. And almost without exception, the "free" services you describe as provided by the government schools through the extravagant waste of tax money are either complete bullshit or are a perfect extension of the problem inherent in the government schools. Just like obtaining strength and conditioning information from a High School Coach, the complete absence of these services would be preferable to obtaining them through the government school district.


    Parents of homeschooled students with special needs will need to access these services in the private sector. If they have the money to do so, then the child may very well be better served in a homeschool environment. If the parents can't afford these services and the child needs them, I think you'd have a hard time arguing that the child is better served in a homeschool environment when all those services would be available to them in a public school environment.
    The above observation applies especially to "special needs" kids.

  8. #48
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    As a product of public education (before it really sucked), I think we are missing one very important element in the discussion on education. After a day in public school, I returned home to parents who interacted with me and taught me far more than school did. They actively worked to help educate me beyond the school context. For a variety of reasons, the responsibility for all education has been thrown to the public school teacher and the parents have been absolved of it. Take away any method of real discipline in the school on top and public schools go down the drain. I suspect everyone on this board has parents that whether they were home schooling or not, took a very defined interest in "teaching" their children to become adults, not just to pass a standardized test. The lack of real parental interaction for many others is a direct impact to the educational system.

  9. #49
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    Absolutely true, Mike. And I can think of no more effective a level of parental involvement in a kid's education than homeschooling.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    We all know lots of them, because there are lots of them to know.



    FREE doesn't exist, as all adults know. And almost without exception, the "free" services you describe as provided by the government schools through the extravagant waste of tax money are either complete bullshit or are a perfect extension of the problem inherent in the government schools. Just like obtaining strength and conditioning information from a High School Coach, the complete absence of these services would be preferable to obtaining them through the government school district.




    The above observation applies especially to "special needs" kids.
    Well, Rip. I guess we're just going to have to agree to disagree on this one. An "absence of these services" is never going to be more beneficial to a child with special needs.

    In response to some of the others that posted in response to my original reply to this thread, thank you for sharing your thoughts and feelings on the topic of homeschooling. I took some time looking over the research available, and I was wrong. Educational outcomes are better for homeschooled children. There are no statistically significant differences between the social-emotional skills of homeschooled children and their publicly educated peers. I'm not sure why my personal experiences with children that are homeschooled has been the exact opposite of what the research suggests. It's possible that the students I work with are predisposed to social skill deficits because of the other difficulties they have (e.g. specific learning disabilities). There has been some research that showed a correlation between specific learning disabilities and deficits in other areas (e.g. executive functioning, social skills, etc.). It's also possible that the reason their parents are seeking outside assistance is because these deficits already existed and are not related to the fact that they are homeschooled. I can't say for sure. Again, I appreciate all of you taking the time to share your opinions/personal experiences related to the topic.

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