Spondylosis in Lumbar Vertebrae Spondylosis in Lumbar Vertebrae

starting strength gym
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Spondylosis in Lumbar Vertebrae

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Posts
    2

    Default Spondylosis in Lumbar Vertebrae

    • wichita falls texas june seminar date
    • texas starting strength seminar september 2020
    Dear Mark (and to anyone else reading this post)

    I would like to start by saying that I have been a fan on you for many years. The content from Starting Strength books and professional growth you have done over the years is outstanding. Thank you for all that you have done for the fitness community and for keeping us strong!

    With that being said, I would like to have your opinion on a issue I am facing currently.

    I am 31 years old and have been a competitive powerlifter for 13 years. I compete in USAPL in the 120 kg class. (I realize you don't like powerlifting but please keep reading.)

    I have a condition called Spondylosis in my lumbar spine. It is considered a Grade 2. It is located on my L6 (yes, I have a L6) and my sacrum. This isn't anything new, I have had this for over half my life and have found a way to still compete safely without too much pain. However, after consulting with chiropractors about my condition and seeing my X-Rays, they have recommended that continuing to compete might not be in my best interest because of my spondylosis and potential spinal cord injuries with the amount of weight I am lifting. I do feel some discomfort at times and it doesn't feel good.

    Not astronomical numbers by any means, but my best competitive squat is 490.5 lbs. and best competitive deadlift is 567.7 lbs.

    Aspects of my life have changed recently. I have been married for nearly 5 years and my wife and I had our first baby in January. I want to be able to play with my daughter and my future children without having too much pain later in life. However, I still want to compete in powerlifting. Fitness has always been one of my main passions, as I hold a Bachelors and Master's Degree in Exercise Science/Human Performance.

    Do you have any recommendations for me?

    Would you consider solely competing in "Bench Only" competitions?

    If so, I obviously don't want my legs, which I have worked hard for over a decade, to turn into toothpicks. I was told that keeping my squat to around 225 for reps would be a good idea/substitute (a hard pill to swallow.)

    How would you implement and or change how I train Squats/Deadlifts/Cleans?

    I have had a goal to bench over 400 pounds in competition. My best is 360.

    To end my rant, I want to be healthy and strong while training intelligently and wise within my limitations from a lower body standpoint. I would really value and appreciate any advice and wisdom you're willing to give me.

    Thank you Mark!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    1,110

    Default

    Did you mean spondylolisthesis (I'm going to assume you did)? Spondylosis is a general term for age related changes to your spine. Do you have any other symptoms besides occasional low back pain? If you want to continue to compete in powerlifting and sticking with bench only makes you feel safer go with that. I would still squat and deadlift heavy but if things are feeling irritated, or your stress levels are very high I would pull back on that day. I do not think you need to keep your squat at 225 lbs. I still think you are capable of hitting PRs if you want to but the process of getting there is going to be difficult and harder to plan for. Pay attention to your experience and make adjustments when you need to prioritizing consistent training and avoiding flare ups. I would also avoid things that have repeated flexion/extension cycles like sit ups and back extensions. I'm linking an article you might find useful and I would also search the forums because this has been spoken about many times before.

    Living With Spondylolisthesis | Rebekah Cygan

    Hope this helps!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    205

    Default

    Great article! I have had the same success. Have not had my back "go out" in 10 years. Occasional pain, but even that is minor compared to what it was.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    162

    Default

    Couple things.

    A grade 2 spondy can be stable in some cases. I would think your strength would be a great asset here. The advice to train on and manage symptoms is what I would do too.

    Also, the spinal cord ends around L1 and becomes the cauda equina (horse tail is translation given its appearance). So, you May have stenosis (central narrowing of the spinal canal) but it won’t be spinal cord injury rather the various nerve roots that have yet to exit the spine. Most of the time I hear patients with this pathology complain of bilateral leg pain with tingling sensations etc.

    Not a doctor but I hope it helps! Nice numbers on the lifts

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I really appreciate all the advice everyone! Again, I feel that the injury is stable due to the hard training I have done over the years.
    I laugh when doctors tell me to strengthen (in Rip's voice) "The Core." Even though there is a element of truth to it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    1,110

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    You're welcome! Good luck with your training.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •