Herniated Disc and LLD Herniated Disc and LLD

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Thread: Herniated Disc and LLD

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
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    Default Herniated Disc and LLD

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    Hi everyone,

    I had surgery 6 months ago for a herniated disc (L5-S1), had a rough recovery but i can finally train again without pain, only problem is i have a LLD, after reading the article on this subject on how Mark fixes this by shimming the short leg i decided to do this too.
    I knew my right leg was shorter than my left for a long time but never really noticed it, now after my surgery i donít want to take any risks with this.

    Bought a pair of romaleos, started by putting some rubber pieces under the short leg bu here is where i bump into the problem as to how to determinate when you get the right height, my wife doesnít really see the difference when i stand up straight..

    Any tips on what the best way to do this is are welcome, and another question, does it matter if youíre 1-2mm ďoffĒ with the shim?

    Thx

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Long Island, NY
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    1,188

    Default

    How large is the discrepancy and where is it located (femur or tibia)? Is there a significant visual asymmetry in the posterior view of your squats?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
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    3

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    The difference measured on x-ray was around 14mm, now when i let my wife use the method described in the article by Mark it doesnít look as if itís that much.
    For as far as my wife could tell (sheís never done this before) itís my tibia, docter didnít specifically mentioned this either so not 100% sure

    What i do know is that when i squat my left hip goes lower than my right hip, shimming my right foot seems to make the left side go even lower compared to my right side. This actually makes me think itís my femur thatís longer

  4. #4
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    Nov 2012
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    Long Island, NY
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    You can still try an asymmetric stance, which I think is in that article. You can also try measuring with a tape measure using bony landmarks (ASIS, medial malleolus, top of the patella). I think a quick and dirty method for measuring is also in the article. If you don't see a visual improvement from behind with either a shim or the staggered stance, then I wouldn't worry about it and just continue squatting. As long as you are gradually increasing the load and the asymmetry is not pornographic, you will continue to adapt and get stronger safely. People squat with asymmetries their entire life with little to no issues, and there are perfectly symmetrical people suffering from chronic back pain. The worst thing you can do in these circumstances is to become obsessed with symmetry, posture, and the like. Always thinking about these things ramps up anxiety and fear and starts becoming a substantial contributor to people's pain experiences (much more significant than the small asymmetric load distribution).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
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    3

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    Ok thank you, i will keep squatting without shimming for now and not giving it too much attention if it keeps going ok

    Since i started lifting (and stretching) again my back has been feeling way better than it ever did from the so called core strengthening stuff they made me do during recovery, guess iím on the right path

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    1,188

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    starting strength coach development program
    You're welcome Goodluck Matt!

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