Starr Rehab and Deadlift? Starr Rehab and Deadlift?

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Thread: Starr Rehab and Deadlift?

  1. #1
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    Sep 2020
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    Default Starr Rehab and Deadlift?

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    I've got an issue that I think might be an upper hamstring tendon thing. SO painful.
    I really feel it when I reach down for deadlifts.
    Has anyone done a version of Starr rehab protocol, sort of like what's done for elbow tendonitis, but for something like this?
    I tried it, but I have a hard time maintaining form and such for sets of 25 reps. Also not sure if this same idea works for this. But if you've got success stories or modifications that worked, I'm game to try 'em.
    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Nov 2012
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    I would use a tempo RDL for this going slow as you lower the bar. Start at 12-15 reps. Do 3-5 total sets per/session (this includes your first warmup) ramping the weight up to a top set or two, with 2-3 sessions per week. Every 2-3 sessions drop the reps and take a slightly bigger jump. So go from 12 to 10 to 8 to 6 the back to 5s. Once you get to 6s start pulling from the floor again. Use straps.

  3. #3
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    Oct 2018
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    Starr rehab is for muscles, not tendons. What works for me 90% of the time for pain are 1) use a lacrosse ball to massage potential trigger points in the affected area, which should include the entire hamstring muscle. A foam roller might work. 2) stretching the muscle.

  4. #4
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    I would not recommend stretching this injury. I actually do not recommend it for almost all tendon injuries. Stretching usually causes more compression of the tendon against a bony surface, which could be a contributor as to why it's pissed off. The video below explains.

    Last edited by Nick D'Agostino; 10-22-2020 at 06:55 PM. Reason: video

  5. #5
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    I'll give those RDL's a shot. Thanks!

    I've never had a foam roller or lacrosse ball work for me. I've tried, maybe I'm doing it wrong, but it's never given me much relief or gotten me back under the bar faster. But doing chin-ups for elbow tendonitis worked for me.

  6. #6
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    If lacrosse ball and foam roller stuff have not worked for you in the past I wouldn't waste your time on it. Some people seem to be responsive to those types of things and others it seems to piss things off.

  7. #7
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    starting strength coach development program
    Update:

    Doing the RDL helped a ton. I'm almost back to normal. At least able to get in and out of the car without almost weeping

    This is just my experience:

    The ball/foam roller hasn't ever worked for me, so I passed on it. Stretching has sometimes been helpful for me in the moment, but my understanding is that it's really only for typical soreness and stretching injuries is really never a good idea (unless the injury is such that a normal range of motion is "stretching").

    Once I was recovered enough to do the motion without the pain being bad enough that it prevented the correct(ish) movement, I started in:
    I did the program as outlined by Mr. D'Agostino, and it helped a lot.
    I also made sure to ONLY do the RDLs and nothing else to let recovery be about the injury only.
    It was slow going, and occasionally I feel an ache, but I'm loads better than I was, and the recovery really sped up once I started working on it.

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