Sudden excruciating back pain Sudden excruciating back pain

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Thread: Sudden excruciating back pain

  1. #1
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    Default Sudden excruciating back pain

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    I'm 69 next month been training 2x week for 2 months. 165 squat, 215 Deads. Haven't trained for a week. Never had a back issue before.

    Yesterday tried to pick up a piece of paper from the ground and when trying to stand up felt the most gawd awful lower back pain ever. So bad I screamed and the maintenance guy ran over to help.

    After a few minutes was able to stand up with some pain and noticed my whole back was tight.

    Took 3 ibuprofen and this morning have only a bit of pain in the lower back and some tightness all over. But gettinf much better.

    How long should I stop training for? If things progress well I shouldn't have any pain by the end of the week.

    I use strict form when training and don't date ugly women, so I thought I was immune to injuries . Should I see a doctor?

  2. #2
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    I would start training again tomorrow or the day after. For your first few sessions back I would ramp the weight up to a top set or two of 5 reps (this means you are doing 5 reps for all of your sets), doing 3-5 total sets after the bar warm up. Don't jump more than 20 lbs between sessions. For example, on Day 1 you may only be able to do 75 lbs on squat and 115 lbs on the deadlift. Then next time you come in don't do more than 95 lbs and 135 lbs. Sometimes these types of tweaks sort themselves out in a week or two. Other times they linger for closer to 6 weeks. If you do not have red flag symptoms (atrophy, foot drop, fever/infection, or bowel and bladder issues) you do not need to go to the doctor.

    Hope this helps!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick D'Agostino View Post
    I would start training again tomorrow or the day after. For your first few sessions back I would ramp the weight up to a top set or two of 5 reps (this means you are doing 5 reps for all of your sets), doing 3-5 total sets after the bar warm up. Don't jump more than 20 lbs between sessions. For example, on Day 1 you may only be able to do 75 lbs on squat and 115 lbs on the deadlift. Then next time you come in don't do more than 95 lbs and 135 lbs. Sometimes these types of tweaks sort themselves out in a week or two. Other times they linger for closer to 6 weeks. If you do not have red flag symptoms (atrophy, foot drop, fever/infection, or bowel and bladder issues) you do not need to go to the doctor.

    Hope this helps!
    Thank you Nick.

  4. #4
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    You're welcome!

  5. #5
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    I've found that lower back *stretches* solves all of my lower back pain. Stand on a small stool, hold a 25 pound dumbbell in your hands and bend forward, knees slightly bent. Let the weight slowly pull your hands closer and closer to the floor. 30-60 seconds, at least.

  6. #6
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    Sometimes gentle movements or "stretches" can help modify someone's symptoms temporarily. What is useful is highly specific to the person using the stretch or movement. For one person, a flexion-based movement helps, and for another, it exacerbates the symptoms, and extension helps. I would not recommend doing the stretch above. Standing on a stool while in back pain bent over holding a weight and 69 yrs old sounds like a recipe for a fall. I would stick to the plan above and realize that your back pain is not something that needs to be "solved" and will go away with time. It is more akin to catching a common cold. Something we all have to deal with and work through but most of the time, not something to worry about.

  7. #7
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    Hey Nick. My back feels like it needs a good stretch. How about hanging on a bsr?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick D'Agostino View Post
    Sometimes gentle movements or "stretches" can help modify someone's symptoms temporarily. What is useful is highly specific to the person using the stretch or movement. For one person, a flexion-based movement helps, and for another, it exacerbates the symptoms, and extension helps. I would not recommend doing the stretch above. Standing on a stool while in back pain bent over holding a weight and 69 yrs old sounds like a recipe for a fall. I would stick to the plan above and realize that your back pain is not something that needs to be "solved" and will go away with time. It is more akin to catching a common cold. Something we all have to deal with and work through but most of the time, not something to worry about.
    Just worked out like you advised me. 3X5 95lbs Squats

    Deads 1X5 115.

    Everything felt great. Had to hold myself back from going heavier.

    I stretched using the pull up bar. Let the weight pull my arms up and stretch my back. This is something I always do anyway. It really felt good for my back.

    Just FYI. I used to play chess with a top notch orthopedic surgeon. he once told me something I'll never forget. he said that every single adult has some type of back "defect". He can always find them with detailed x-rays. He could not predict, for the most part, which ones were going to cause issues in the future.

  9. #9
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    I'm glad things are moving in the right direction ChessGuy! I think doing a dead hang stretch is fine. What your surgeon friend noticed is exactly what is panning out in the literature. We can always find a "defect" on an image but linking that to pain is often trickier than you think and usually not productive for the types of aches and pain that emerge just from living life.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick D'Agostino View Post
    I'm glad things are moving in the right direction ChessGuy! I think doing a dead hang stretch is fine. What your surgeon friend noticed is exactly what is panning out in the literature. We can always find a "defect" on an image but linking that to pain is often trickier than you think and usually not productive for the types of aches and pain that emerge just from living life.
    Hey Nick, are you a Chiropractor or Dr. by any chance?

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