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Thread: Bicep pain in press

  1. #1
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    Default Bicep pain in press

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    Lately I have been developing what feels like bicep tendonitis during my press. The pain is at the top of my bicep where it connects to my shoulder, and only gets aggravated during the press. I use a safety bar for my squat so I donít think my squat grip is causing the issue. Is this common? I am going to do a pin firing protocol with chins to see if I can work this out, but I am curious if there is anything else I should be doing?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnsonville View Post
    Lately I have been developing what feels like bicep tendonitis during my press. The pain is at the top of my bicep where it connects to my shoulder, and only gets aggravated during the press. I use a safety bar for my squat so I don’t think my squat grip is causing the issue. Is this common? I am going to do a pin firing protocol with chins to see if I can work this out, but I am curious if there is anything else I should be doing?
    Your press is not right, and it is almost certain you are either carrying the bar poorly at the beginning or your are rotating your elbows out in the press incorrectly, as those are the most common problems with the press that lead to proximal biceps tendon pain.

    I personally don't recommend the pin firing protocol for tendon related pain that isn't lateral or medial epicondylitis. Using chin-ups for lateral / medial epicondylitis is fine because there isn't a way to really load the flexor or extensor groups in the forearms like you can for other tendons that are commonly painful.

  3. #3
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    Thanks will. I did some presses just now and realized I have been rotating my elbows out. Is there any protocol you would recommend for bicep tendonitis? I see nick d wrote out a curl version that I can start if that seems appropriate

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnsonville View Post
    Thanks will. I did some presses just now and realized I have been rotating my elbows out. Is there any protocol you would recommend for bicep tendonitis? I see nick d wrote out a curl version that I can start if that seems appropriate
    I am a big fan, both in the clinic and in the gym, of treating tendon related pain with heavy, slow resistance work....or what we in the biz call "tempo work".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    I am a big fan, both in the clinic and in the gym, of treating tendon related pain with heavy, slow resistance work....or what we in the biz call "tempo work".
    Have followed this same recommendation from Will to rehab various tendon-type pains related to the squat. Works extremely well. Highly recommend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    I am a big fan, both in the clinic and in the gym, of treating tendon related pain with heavy, slow resistance work....or what we in the biz call "tempo work".
    Will, heard you on the podcast. Very good stuff, thanks for sharing

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    I am a big fan, both in the clinic and in the gym, of treating tendon related pain with heavy, slow resistance work....or what we in the biz call "tempo work".
    I appreciate the responses will. If I can ask one last question: what sets reps and frequency would you generally recommend? I have been doing 3x25 of 90 degree curls twice a week and they sure do piss off the tendon. I also am seeing an orthopedic to see if there is anything causing the pain other than incorrect overuse.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnsonville View Post
    I appreciate the responses will. If I can ask one last question: what sets reps and frequency would you generally recommend? I have been doing 3x25 of 90 degree curls twice a week and they sure do piss off the tendon. I also am seeing an orthopedic to see if there is anything causing the pain other than incorrect overuse.
    I don't think you can really get very far away from triples on tempo reps if you are loading them heavy enough. 4-5 triples is my standard rx for stuff like this. A couple times a week is necessary.

    Now, to the statement about seeing the orthopedic surgeon; what if you were to attempt to identify the problem, intervene on that identified problem, and move forward that way prior to consulting a surgeon? Seeing a surgeon is really most useful when you have a structural or mechanical dysfunction that suggests you have something that can be identified and treated surgically. Seeing a surgeon prior to you hitting this threshold is almost certainly going to be anticlimactic, particularly if your intention is to get concrete evidence of the pain generator, be given reasonable advice for your training, or if you intend on having someone take a deep look at your situation and help you come to a conclusion that benefits you first and foremost.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    I don't think you can really get very far away from triples on tempo reps if you are loading them heavy enough. 4-5 triples is my standard rx for stuff like this. A couple times a week is necessary.

    Now, to the statement about seeing the orthopedic surgeon; what if you were to attempt to identify the problem, intervene on that identified problem, and move forward that way prior to consulting a surgeon? Seeing a surgeon is really most useful when you have a structural or mechanical dysfunction that suggests you have something that can be identified and treated surgically. Seeing a surgeon prior to you hitting this threshold is almost certainly going to be anticlimactic, particularly if your intention is to get concrete evidence of the pain generator, be given reasonable advice for your training, or if you intend on having someone take a deep look at your situation and help you come to a conclusion that benefits you first and foremost.
    Thank you, thatís great info. Regarding the orthopedic, my pain goal was to see if there was anything such as a bone spur or some sort of tear in anything. Normally I donít care about being in pain, the recent article posted on the site really hit that point Home, I was just thinking of being proactive

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