Strength and Height Differences Strength and Height Differences - Page 3

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Thread: Strength and Height Differences

  1. #21
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    Whoa. There are graphs and stuff in this discussion... I can't compete with that. But, since the prime movers in the pertinent lifts are 3rd class levers, a longer bone would decrease the mechanical advantage around the joint, which would necesitate a stronger force from the muscle fibers to move the same load. So if we use the stupid, traditional "contractile potential" measure, I guess the taller guy would be stronger because the muscle fibers have to pull harder on the less mechanically advantageous limb. But if we use the "practical application of force" argument you could either say that the taller guy is moving the same load farther, which may or may not be "more practical," or you could say that the smaller guy, who's contractile potential is less, is getting a higher ratio out of the contractile potential/practical application of force.

    Don't lifting meets have some method of determining the strongest athletes by body weight? Does that have any impact to this discussion?

  2. #22
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    The work done by a powerlifter is significantly less than that done by a weightlifter. Power is lower as well. The powerlifter, however, produces a much higher force on the bar.

  3. #23
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    Perhaps this needs to be restated, Jamie.

  4. #24
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    The guy who can lift the tractor, equipment, rubble, whatever, off his buddy is stronger than the guy who can't and lets his buddy die. Debate over. Get strongER.

  5. #25
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    I like 'How far?' and 'How much?' for my answer to the strength question; and 'How far?', 'How much?' and 'How long?' for the power question.

    Strength and Power are used as synonyms so readily for so long they have lost meaning almost altogether..... hence necessitating very good threads like this one.

  6. #26
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    This thread is making my head hurt.

  7. #27
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    Here's my question:

    If the there was a deadlift competition where success was only measured by bar distance who would win?

    Let's say the competition was done in a power cage with the pins set at 24". Each lifter just has to touch the pins with the bar for a good lift. Which of these lifters, the tall one or the short one, would win?

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlentzner View Post
    Here's my question:

    If the there was a deadlift competition where success was only measured by bar distance who would win?

    Let's say the competition was done in a power cage with the pins set at 24". Each lifter just has to touch the pins with the bar for a good lift. Which of these lifters, the tall one or the short one, would win?
    So you're asking who would be stronger in rack pulls, short or tall people? I suppose it depends on whether the individual lifter is stronger on the first half or the second half of the pull...the 24" would be at a completely different part of the body of a 6'4" person as a 5'4" person.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by RRod View Post
    Work = Force x Distance is only valid when the force is *constant* over the distance. So if the force vs. distance curve deviates at all from horizontal line, you gotta go to the more complicated formulas given here:
    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/wcon.html
    Luckily, this situation is straightforward enough that we don't actually need to integrate or make assumptions about how the force production changes. Total work done is simply the potential energy gained by the bar, mgh (m = mass, g = gravitational constant, h = height). m and g are the same for both lifters, so work is directly proportional to the final height of the bar.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric K View Post
    ...But, since the prime movers in the pertinent lifts are 3rd class levers, a longer bone would decrease the mechanical advantage around the joint, which would necesitate a stronger force from the muscle fibers to move the same load. So if we use the stupid, traditional "contractile potential" measure, I guess the taller guy would be stronger because the muscle fibers have to pull harder on the less mechanically advantageous limb.
    As a tall, naturally "skinny fat" person, I believe this to be correct. WHen it comes to weightlifting/powerlifting, longer levers require greater strength. Period. Whethere more work gets done or more power is generated depends on the aforementioned time and distance variables.

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