New Video: The RDL New Video: The RDL

starting strength gym
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 47

Thread: New Video: The RDL

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    43,565

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    6,049

    Default

    Sorry if this is a stupid question, but would you recommend that I use RDLs to strengthen my lower back (it is too weak) even though I do not bounce my deadlifts?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    43,565

    Default

    How much do you deadlift, and how long have you been training?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    6,049

    Default

    I've been training a little over a year, I can deadlift 360x5 or so with good form.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    43,565

    Default

    You might throw them in every two weeks and see what happens. But if your deadlift is still going up, I think I would keep doing what has been working.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    Posts
    9,832

    Default

    How would one incorporate RDL's in a TM program? The goal being to help pushing the deadlift, that is.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Richland, WA
    Posts
    1,711

    Default

    Awesome, I was thinking of incorporating these sometime soon. Thanks!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8

    Default

    I'm glad this video got posted because the issue of a stretch reflex on the deadlift has been a consistent, nagging thought in the back of my head for some time. You've stated multiple times that the lift should be done sans eccentric component and I've had a difficult time wrapping my head around that. It seems to me that the deadlift would be more beneficial with the inclusion of the stretch reflex for a few reasons:

    1. The deadlift can't be used as often as other lifts because it's harder to recover from, due to the nature of the concentric start and because of the higher numbers inherent. If the descent is included deliberately as part of the process, wouldn't that negate some of the recovery issue and enable more frequent usage?

    2. Greater weights can be handled across multiple reps than can be pulled from a dead stop every time. The heavier weight would stress the systems involved more, particularly in the grip since there isn't the opportunity for rest at the bottom. The added stress would drive a greater adaptation, yes?

    3. To bounce a deadlift is always a bad idea, just as it is a bad idea to bounce the bar of the ribcage during a bench press. But I think the same control that allows a touch-and-go on the bench press can be used to deadlift. I think it's certainly possible to maintain all the components of a solid dead as the bar is lowered back down to set up an immediate next rep.

    4. The main feature of the dead, as you said in the video, is to train from a mechanically disadvantaged position in a dead stop. The first rep will by necessity always be a true deadlift, but it's not like the next reps in line are having the concentric aspect removed. The concentric contraction coming out of the hole in the squat is made harder because it is preceded by the negative. A negative is encouraged on the press for this reason as well. Why not take advantage of it in the dead?

    I apologize for the lengthiness of this post, I wanted to make myself as understandable as I could. And I have utilized the search function to see how others' related questions were answered, but the threads I found were unsatisfying. If I've come off as an arrogant, know-it-all, dick I apologize for that as well. I welcome any dismantling of my arguments, I just wanna understand where you're coming from and make sense of it all. Thanks so much for your time,

    -Schyler

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    3,553

    Default

    Mark how about goodmornings for the next platform video? and if you can, please get the most unflexible schmuck in your gym at the time to do them. thanks!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    459

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    This is my favourite video of all time. The momentum created when bouncing your deadlifts essentially negates every rep after the first. Since we value sets of 5 or even 3 for their overall contribution to strength and growth, trainees should be honest with the way they approach the deadlift. So comments like, "TNG still allows me to increase my 1RM" shouldn't be used to justify this sort of behaviour. And since when is a 1RM valuable with a rounded back and weak extension? I think the deadlift is a prime example of the difference between getting strong and being able to handle as much weight as possible. What I see at gyms today is a combination of both--the RDL and the TNG. Either that, or the TNG is accompanied by a very wide stance and a near-vertical back.

    Thanks again for the resources, Rip. I will have to try the RDL in due time.

    Notes:
    If and when someone spots the orangutan, please let me know, as I did not see it this time.

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •