Starr's Lifts Starr's Lifts

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Thread: Starr's Lifts

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Chicago
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    6,049

    Default Starr's Lifts

    Do you happen to know what Bill Starr's best lifts were in the squat and bench press?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    38,851

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    I don't remember. Moser will know.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Deep South
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    1,002

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    Would be very interested to know about his Olympic lifts too!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maui, HI
    Posts
    231

    Default Starr

    These are his training lifts, I think I am pretty close on these.
    He lifted in 90kg class and did not start lifting late until after the service. A great cleaner.

    Deadlift - 715
    Squat - low 600's, no wraps or suit only Hoffman Knee Bands
    Bench Press- mid 400's with a pause no shirt or wraps.
    Split Snatch - 315
    Press - 365
    C&J - 425 Cleaned 445

    His two biggest claims to fame in my opinion where he was the first active athlete to be a head coach at an international weightlifting event and he beat Bednarski once. Starr had a major influence in the fair treatment of athletes in the AAU and the York organization.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bedford Texas
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    366

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    I sent a check and a letter to Starr for his book Defying Gravity back around 2000. I asked him a couple questions in the letter and didnt think he would ever even see it and he writes me a page and half letter back.

    His book "The Strongest Shall Survive" is still an all time favorite and something I base a great deal of my training philosophy on...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Long Island, NY
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    2,125

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Janecek View Post
    I sent a check and a letter to Starr for his book Defying Gravity back around 2000. I asked him a couple questions in the letter and didnt think he would ever even see it and he writes me a page and half letter back.

    His book "The Strongest Shall Survive" is still an all time favorite and something I base a great deal of my training philosophy on...
    I was fortunate enough to buy a copy of "The Strongest Shall Survive" back when I was 17. It completely changed the way I trained. The basic program outlined in that book was the first program that I made any real progress with and it was something that I always went back to when I could get away from my college strength coach for a few weeks. It amazes me how relevant much of the information in Starr's books are over thirty years after their original publications.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    456

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Petrizzo View Post
    I was fortunate enough to buy a copy of "The Strongest Shall Survive" back when I was 17. It completely changed the way I trained. The basic program outlined in that book was the first program that I made any real progress with and it was something that I always went back to when I could get away from my college strength coach for a few weeks. It amazes me how relevant much of the information in Starr's books are over thirty years after their original publications.
    "The more things change, the more they stay the same" comes to my mind when it comes to effective weight training. IMHO, it's hard to drive marketing of products containing age-old truths until the truth gets lost in all the noise and someone (like Rip & Co) comes along and makes the old seem like something new again. I've put on quite a bit of (mostly useful) weight over the last couple of months such that a couple of the younger guys at work have asked me what I'm doing, and I usually reply w/ something along the lines of "basic barbell training, things like the Squat, Press and Deadlift; takes about an hr three times a week". The next question typically alternates between "what supplements are you using?", "you don't do curls?!?" or "aren't you worried 'bout your knees and back?" (I'm 49 y/o). The other thing is they are usually skeptical about only 3-4 hrs. per week too: "No way! You gotta be doing the <some body builder name here> advanced split, or something, aren't you?". Kinda comical b/c the same pattern keeps getting repeated.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    227

    Default

    Amazing. Bill was even stronger than his articles led me to believe. His physique was pretty amazing too. And moustache.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maui, HI
    Posts
    231

    Default Strongest Shall Survive

    Starr's book The Strongest Shall Survive is a must for any strength library. The book has withstood time, almost 40 years with no significant updates. The material is as relevant today as it was in the 70's. I keep a case of books on hand and recommend a copy to anyone who wants to get strong for any sport. Knowing Starr as long as I have he would always understate a lot of his lifts. He mainly references his competition lifts. I was very fortunate to follow Starr's teachings and to follow his travels from York Barbell to Hawaii and a lot of places in between. I am even more fortunate to have met a lot of his friends along the way. His gym and bar stories are legendary to his friends. They broke the mold with Bill Starr. There is and will never be another Bill Starr. I was once asked to describe Bill Starr. I simply replied "It can not be done"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    215

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    I don't see "The Strongest Shall Survive" on Amazon; anyone know where I could get a copy?

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