Podcast 5 is up Podcast 5 is up

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Thread: Podcast 5 is up

  1. #1
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    Default Podcast 5 is up

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    http://startingstrength.com/index.ph...nnel_episode_5

    Rip and Stef discuss potentially irritating rehab topics.

  2. #2
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    Many thanks - good to hear a podcast on this topic as I am currently following the rehab protocol (I'll update David Kirkham's hamstring testimonial thread on this topic when I'm done).

    I've been asked by a few folks why I've been following the pattern of low weight and high reps - and seen plenty of furrowed brows as a result. Quite why the conventional approach of doing as little as possible rather than as much as possible is expected to restore function is beyond me. I'm pleased to say that the "obviously crazy" notion of restoring usual function by pursuing as much usual function as I can manage (every day) seems to be working just fine.

  3. #3
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    "Potentially irritating."

    Ah, the famous Rippetoe tendency to understatement.

  4. #4
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    This is very timely for me. Looking forward to listening tomorrow.

  5. #5
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    Well what about when you add age to this wholistic approach? Don't older folk take longer to recover anyway? What I mean is I have this stupid elbow tendentious that just seems to go on and on. I am not doing anything except at times stick a restrictive band below the elbow, other than that it is business as usual. I have not stopped exercising, I mean training.

    If I go to the physio he will only given me some stretching exercises and tell me stay away from the barbells for a while. However its not getting worse, its static, I just put up with it.

    Listen how about a bit more Steff next time, and don't cut her off at the end of the program. OK?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by wal View Post
    Listen how about a bit more Steff next time, and don't cut her off at the end of the program. OK?
    We're keeping the podcasts to an approximate time, Wal. Coordinating between two people who are both entirely capable of speaking for extended periods of time is a challenge. And both of us are used to a more free discussion style where participants jump in whenever. This can alarm and confuse those who are used to a more controlled, linear approach who sometimes perceive it as argumentative or aggressive. We tried to keep off of each other - I sure didn't succeed - but the idea was to make it easier to follow for those who are not in the room.

  7. #7
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    Great podcast, and to back this all up, here's my own story of my last "injury" , during a sparring session I got sweeped to my side and that sweep was followed by a clicking sound and pain in the wright side of my knee. Since I was able to limp around I decided not to go to a doctor. When I got home I didn't move unnecessary for 2 days. Then I did 2 days of 2Xday walks(1/2), and then after those two days I started with 40kg deadlifts (bill Star rehab program) and in two weeks I was good as new. Now, the injury wasn't all that drastic,but from my own experience, the doctors advice would have been 2 weeks of strict rest and then some very very light work - nothing concrete for at least a month. So, if it ain't broke and you can use it - by all means do so ASAP.

    Once more, great podcast.

  8. #8
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    You mention several times in the podcast that the uninjured structures "protect" the injured one when stressed in their normal movement patterns. Could you please elaborate on what you mean when you say protect?

  9. #9
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    They provide the force necessary to move the skeletal component that the injured muscle cannot provide. They are working alongside the injured component, because you are using a multi-muscle multi-joint exercise FOR THIS REASON. Therefore, the injured muscle contracts at the level of force production that it can, while the movement is completed by the uninjured components. The weight will be lighter because of the deficit and the pain, but high reps compensate for the lack of intensity, and the lactate seems to have some role in the healing process as well. As it heals, it becomes progressively more capable of doing its full anatomically-assigned job of contraction.

  10. #10
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    So "protect" is really nothing more than performing their normal function, while allowing the injured component to perform its normal function, correct?

    Your comment about the role of lactate facilitating healing is interesting - are there any resources you could point to where I could learn more or is this observation just based on experience?

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