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  1. #1
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    Default Death

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    So as I sit here washing down my lunch of 6 eggs with a liter of milk the thought occurs to me: I may be eating myself to an early grave. Is the "caloric deficit" group correct that if you eat less you live longer? I'm certainly gaining weight, and the 60/40 LBM to fat ratio seems about right, but I wonder about the long term consequences.

    So finally my question: these powerlifters and weightlifters in the stories on this board - are these people that made it to their 80s and 90s? Maybe it is too early to tell yet. But, anecdotally, the legendary eaters like Phil we-won't-even-mention-the-contest-to-him Grippaldi, do they die young?

  2. #2
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    If you are more concerned about being 90 than being strong, this is the wrong board to post on.

  3. #3
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    Try a search. I believe Jordan addressed this on the Nutrition forum. IIRC, his analysis of the data found that the common belief that borderline starvation (yes, I've heard it called this by proponents of this viewpoint) increases lifespan is incorrect.

  4. #4
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    Yes caloric restriction could enhance your lifespan a little through a few biological processes but that doesn't mean that your quality of life will remain the same. It's for you to decide what's more important to you. I think I'll stick to the milk.

    Btw. apparently fasting every couple of days (for I don't know how many hours) has the same effect on enhancing the lifespan, which makes sense considering that we humans throughout most our history didn't always have success when we were hunting. So fasting was a normal thing on a bad day. Well now we can "hunt" through the supermarket or even order a pizza at the slightest sign of feeling hungry. The thing is that "they" don't know yet for sure whether increasing one's lifespan through fasting is related to caloric restriction itself or not.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhett View Post
    So as I sit here washing down my lunch of 6 eggs with a liter of milk the thought occurs to me: I may be eating myself to an early grave. Is the "caloric deficit" group correct that if you eat less you live longer? I'm certainly gaining weight, and the 60/40 LBM to fat ratio seems about right, but I wonder about the long term consequences.

    So finally my question: these powerlifters and weightlifters in the stories on this board - are these people that made it to their 80s and 90s? Maybe it is too early to tell yet. But, anecdotally, the legendary eaters like Phil we-won't-even-mention-the-contest-to-him Grippaldi, do they die young?
    Just throwing in my two cents.

    We had a discussion about this in some other section of the forum, but I can't be arsed to look for it.

    Anyways, there was a study a while back according to which olympic athletes live longer than the average person, and that included weightlifters.

    It seems like the lifters who stay gargantuan their whole lives tend to pop their clogs pretty soon, whereas the ones who eventually reduce down to a "reasonable" bodyweight live on. Marty Gallagher said something similar in reference to Hugh Cassidy reducing down from that gargantuan bodyweight.

    But I don't know. I'm not a competitive lifter, so I'm not really concerned with pushing my bodyweight up to something ridiculous, so I'm not terribly worried.

  6. #6
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    It would be interesting to see the mortality rates and various causes of death for a large group of lifting and/or trained individuals compared the general population. I doubt it'd be very meaningful, but I don't suppose anyone here has that, eh?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    If you are more concerned about being 90 than being strong, this is the wrong board to post on.
    Does this mean that BBT is for strength, at the expense of long term health?

    rhett, AFAIK a relatively recent long term study on calorie restriction in humans (or was it primates?) concluded that it does not increase longevity.

  8. #8
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    There is allegedly* a correlation between lower caloric intake and increased lifespan. Do not confuse correlation with causation, as this pisses all of us off.

    *I am not familar with the literature, but I'm willing to accept such a correlation as fact, because it seems easy enough to establish that even the nutrition guys couldn't screw it up. Right?

  9. #9
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    I had a feeling this would fall into "I don't care if you can see your abs" category.

  10. #10
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    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by rhett View Post
    So as I sit here washing down my lunch of 6 eggs with a liter of milk the thought occurs to me: I may be eating myself to an early grave. Is the "caloric deficit" group correct that if you eat less you live longer? I'm certainly gaining weight, and the 60/40 LBM to fat ratio seems about right, but I wonder about the long term consequences.

    So finally my question: these powerlifters and weightlifters in the stories on this board - are these people that made it to their 80s and 90s? Maybe it is too early to tell yet. But, anecdotally, the legendary eaters like Phil we-won't-even-mention-the-contest-to-him Grippaldi, do they die young?
    Who wants to be 90 with femur stress fractures, sarcopenia, and thoracic kyphosis? Do you know that many old people break their hips from walking and fall rather than fall and break their hips? If Oldster has a stroke and loses the use of one side of his body he will still be more mobile than half the people his age in the country. Grip strength is found in medical studies to be a useful predictor of longevity in the elderly.
    Go squat, and eat your yolks.

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