Breaking from the NSCA Breaking from the NSCA

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Thread: Breaking from the NSCA

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Breaking from the NSCA

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    First post, hello everyone.

    NSCA-CSCS here, the NSCA is an expensive scam. My question Rip is I don't even want to represent the NSCA, what should I do? I want the SS level 2 cert and/or USAW and figured I can just let the CSCS cert expire(I have until December to get 1.8 more CEUs that do nothing to make me a better coach...)

    I do not own my own facility(yet) but I work at a club and will be speaking with them about this soon. If you were in my position, what would you do?


    This is a magazine they just put up on the NSCA facebook page, http://fitnesstrainermag.uberflip.com/t/47105 I'm embarrassed, 80% of this magazine is marketing snake oil and the rest I don't even want to get into. "Build muscle with sprinting"- Yea, I'm done. This crap is the reason their is now the CSCC cert.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    North Texas
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    I formally relinquished my credential in 2009. Wrote them a letter informing them that I was unsatisfied with their academic rigor, their bullshit insurance program, and their embarrassing publications, that I was hereby relinquishing my credential, that I would no longer use it, and that they could not use my name as having the credential. Then I published it on the web and sent that to them too. If you can work at the club without the CSCS, just do it.

  3. #3
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    Apr 2011
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    I have basically let all my certs expire as I ended up thinking they were all a bullshit waste of time. They made me no better of a trainer or coach and just raped me of money periodically. I have learned a thousand times more things from your book, my own training, and a load of other trainer manuals with no association with any training credential organizations. I'll renew USAW purely on the fact it will let me to continue being a trainer in a facility.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    46

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    PhillyMike Ė
    While I canít argue the points made about the NSCA, you might consider keeping it for a couple more years due simply to its name recognition. I donít know how established you are with your career, but regardless of how anyone on this site feels about the organization no one can deny the fact that the CSCS (similar to any ACSM cert) is a job requirement for many positions. If youíre established, just walk away and donít think about it again. I have no doubt the SS cert is incomparable for prepping a trainer/coach, but Iím not sure it has the notoriety to be your sole certification.
    Iíve heard mixed reviews of the USAW certs and considering how much Ripís training philosophy and overall thoughts differ from the standard U.S. olympic training, you might find the material conflicts with much of the SS material. Just something to look into.
    I should note that I am a CSCS (non-practicing) and havenít worked professionally in the fitness field for several years, so take this into consideration when reading my opinion. Iím not a big fan of the NSCA, especially the way they have transformed over the past decade, but their letters next to your name can open doors for jobs. The key is to just get the job and then practice what you know really works.

  5. #5
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    Dec 2008
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    After looking at the link in the original post I fully retract my previous statement. The NSCA has really delved into the depths of fitness filth. This "publication" looks eerily similar to a Weider magazine. Drop the cert and get out now!

    Wouldn't it be nice if gyms required a "hands on" aspect of their interviews? I'm sure some do, but usually they just look for a known set of letters (NSCA, ACSM, ACE, AFAA, NASM, USAW, etc.). I've seen great trainers with each of these certs, but I've also seen miserable ones that I don't think deserve to enter a gym that supplies barbells.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    26

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    Thank you very much Rip. And DAB, the name recognition is the one reason I might stick with it and the fact that I won't have to sit for another test and the bullshit that goes along with it if i just recertify.

    I will most likely recertify this cycle then in 3 years just let it lapse. I just want people out there to know that the CSCS is nothing special anymore.

    In my opinion, I am a great strength coach, but the CSCS letters next to someone's name doesn't mean jack shit because all you have to do is have a bachelor's degree and study their "Essentials of Strength and Conditioning" text.


    Yes, the test was hard, don't get me wrong, but I'm embarrassed by the NSCA and just because you can pass a written test doesn't mean you know how to properly teach the squat.


    -Mike

    Again, thanks guys.

  7. #7
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    My gym has a practical assessment. Unfortunately they usually pick the trainers with the best personalities or performance to carry them out. So even though they are supposedly there to stop terrible trainers getting through they often do because the person judging hasn't got a clue either.

  8. #8
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    Nov 2010
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    Mike you and I need to go to a bar in and have a drink I'm 20minutes from Philly.

  9. #9
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    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bedford Texas
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    Had my CSCS from 1997-2005(?) till I let it expire. In my 24 years of strength coaching I have been asked about having it maybe one time. I keep my USAW though, never know when I'll compete again.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    starting strength nutrition camp
    Quote Originally Posted by DAB View Post
    Wouldn't it be nice if gyms required a "hands on" aspect of their interviews? I'm sure some do, but usually they just look for a known set of letters (NSCA, ACSM, ACE, AFAA, NASM, USAW, etc.). I've seen great trainers with each of these certs, but I've also seen miserable ones that I don't think deserve to enter a gym that supplies barbells.
    In Australia, quite often there'll be a phone interview, and around half those people get an in-person interview. Around half of those then do a practical interview.

    However, the managers themselves may not have the knowledge to assess the potential employee's level of knowledge. No gym manager I've interviewed with knew what "below parallel" meant, or the difference between a high and low bar squat. That said, competence stands out - if you can get a healthy adult under 50 and get them to do a decent squat (of whatever kind) and pushup within five minutes of their starting to learn it, then even a moron will see you know what you're doing.

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