Soreness relationship to intermediate Soreness relationship to intermediate

starting strength gym
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Soreness relationship to intermediate

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Jupiter, Florida
    Posts
    249

    Default Soreness relationship to intermediate

    • phoenix arizona seminar date
    • texas seminar date
    Hi Rip,

    Does the amount of soreness you experience have any correlation to your readiness for intermediate programming? I started LP in January squatting 135 and got to about 300 with no noticeable soreness after the first few workouts. I am up to 335 squats now, and from 300-335 I started getting extremely sore between workouts, to the point where occasionally the soreness affects my form detrimentally. The squats recently have contained many more "grind it out" reps than previously. I've noticed similar phenomena on bench press (232.5 lbs) with chesticle soreness.

    Noting has changed in my diet either. I've gone from 215 to 247 lbs since January 1. 24 year old male.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    39,328

    Default

    If soreness was an indicator of intermediate status, all CrossFitters would be intermediate. Soreness is the result of eccentric loading, and persistent soreness is a the result of the lack of recovery, most often related to an inadequate protein intake. Count your protein intake, and make sure you're getting at least 1 gram per pound of bodyweight. What might have been adequate previously may well be inadequate as you approach the limits of 48-hour recovery.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    If soreness was an indicator of intermediate status, all CrossFitters would be intermediate. Soreness is the result of eccentric loading, and persistent soreness is a the result of the lack of recovery, most often related to an inadequate protein intake. Count your protein intake, and make sure you're getting at least 1 gram per pound of bodyweight. What might have been adequate previously may well be inadequate as you approach the limits of 48-hour recovery.
    Per gram of lean bodyweight or bodyweight?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    39,328

    Default

    Per gram of bodyweight, unless you are a hog.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    745

    Default

    Soreness happens if you aren't eating enough.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    1,275

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PressesPeople View Post
    Soreness happens if you aren't eating enough.
    I believe soreness is attributable to more than just diet. One can be eating sufficiently but if they jump from doing, say, 3x3 on any exercise to 3x8-10 a lifter may experience soreness. As Rip said, its due to eccentric loading and lack of sufficient protein / macro's.

    I would venture that the OP's reps are slowing down as the weight on the bar is going up resulting in increased time under tension and more soreness. He has probably also kept his diet around the same (as only a minority of lifters routinely schedule adjustments to their food intake [here's looking at you Jordan]) as when he began LP.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Jupiter, Florida
    Posts
    249

    Default

    My eccentric portion of the lift has certainly slowed, so this makes sense. When the weight gets heavy it's hard to convince myself that my back won't snap in two if I drop into the hole with some speed haha

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    379

    Default

    Speaking of Jordan, there's a relevant thread on his forum: http://startingstrength.com/resource...ad.php?t=48482

    He mentions hydration (or lack of it) might be a contributing factor in DOMS, in addition to protein.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,268

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bryant View Post
    Per gram of lean bodyweight or bodyweight?

    I believe it's a gram of protein per pound of bodyweight... you could try a pound of protein per gram of bodyweight but that'd be a little overkill, I think.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    1,925

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Murphy View Post
    you could try a pound of protein per gram of bodyweight but that'd be a little overkill, I think.
    Yeah, who can afford that. I just do a gram of protein per gram of bodyweight. Pretty easy to eyeball that, just eat something the size of you every day.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •