Post Labral Surgical Repair Training Future Post Labral Surgical Repair Training Future

starting strength gym
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Post Labral Surgical Repair Training Future

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    6

    Default Post Labral Surgical Repair Training Future

    Coach Rip,
    I think I have read somewhere on this forum that you don't have much experience with Labral Tears, but I bet you know some lifters that have had them. That being said, I would like you and others to chime in on my question/statement/predicament.

    - Age: 45yo, Male, Current Training: Pure Shoulder Rehab- strengthening 3x weekly & daily stretching , Conditioning: Sprinting 3x weekly, Walking with weighted vest 3x weekly.

    -No pain, very little tightness at end range of motion.

    My training history is simple: overtrained bodybuilder with piss poor form until 4 years ago. I then came across your books & site (which are extremely helpful). I am also a recently licensed Physical Therapist Assistant (which is also part of the problem). I had an arthroscopic Labral Repair to the left shoulder (Bankhart Lesion & Hill-Sachs Lesion, very small according the MRI), with debridement 4 months ago.
    The rotator cuff muscles & supraspinatus were in great shape and surgery was a success & my recovery is going exceptionally well. My predicament: I am troubled by what my Physical Therapist said,
    "No more heavy training (bench & shoulder pressing), give up doing chins". I don't want to give up training. What I'm asking is there anyone out there or does anyone know someone who has undergone this surgery and return to heavy training without re-injuring themselves? My training is drastically different now: soft tissue work, mobility training, stretching, less frequency. I believe I train a lot smarter than before. I appreciate any and all feedback.

    Many thanks,
    Stonecold357

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    38,820

    Default

    Perhaps your Physical Therapist could provide an explanation for his recommendations. A detailed recommendation that a PTA can actually understand. Be so good as to reproduce this wisdom here for us.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    40

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stonecold357 View Post
    ..."No more heavy training (bench & shoulder pressing), give up doing chins". I don't want to give up training. What I'm asking is there anyone out there or does anyone know someone who has undergone this surgery and return to heavy training without re-injuring themselves? My training is drastically different now: soft tissue work, mobility training, stretching, less frequency. I believe I train a lot smarter than before. I appreciate any and all feedback.

    Many thanks,
    Stonecold357
    I am also 45 and had shoulder surgery about 5 years ago - not quite a labral tear but the edges of the labrum were pretty ragged (and Crossfit certainly didn't help that...). The surgeon fixed me up nicely, debrided the labrum and the AC joint too while he was in there. I can lift more today than ever and have absolutely no issues at all with any exercise, including all the ones you mention: I can painlessly do weighted chins, bench, and overhead presses. I'm also working on snatching now and increasing shoulder flexibility to do them better. IMHO, once you are healed and rehabbed (for me, it was about 4 or 5 months total before starting LP), you just start light, use excellent form, and stop if something hurts that shouldn't - just the common sense stuff.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    6

    Default

    I will Coach, thanks. In retrospect, I have no clue why I didn't ask her. I think I was so overwhelmed by what she said. I walked out of that office determined to prove her wrong, determined to train smarter, safer and be stronger than ever. Will post my PT's explainnation after next PT visit.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    1,650

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stonecold357 View Post
    I don't want to give up training.
    Then don't. There are very few conditions that actually require someone to give up training.... ALS being one of them. So, as long as your Alpha Motor Neurons aren't systematically dying off, you can continue to train.

    Your PT made that recommendation for two reasons: 1) he / she doesn't understand what heavy benching / pressing does to a human body, and 2) legal liability.

    If he/she tells you that you are clear to bench press and you drop the bar on yourself, you are going to sue him / her for everything they are worth. Your attorney is going to pull studies out of his ass that talk about standard rehab protocols and make the claim that your therapist didn't follow the standard of care. They will bring in pencil necked experts to testify and they will agree that bench pressing is inherently dangerous and this therapist was negligent in his recommendation to you. Your therapist will be held liable. You will end up with a $20 check after your attorney takes his cut, because PTs aren't worth much of anything, and this therapist will have to find some other way to pay back his $200,000 in student loans. His nametag at Home Depot will read "Steve, DPT".

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    9

    Default

    I had a repair about three years ago from a Bankart lesion and SLAP tear. I bench and press comfortably, and was doing so a few months after the surgery, starting with very light weights. You do need to be a little careful early after the surgery, as you don't want those anchors coming loose from the bone.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    6

    Default

    I appreciate your feedback & input, it is what I was thinking. Can't wait to start back.
    Thank you Misciagno!

    Thank you Will, that was precisely what I was thinking!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    1,650

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stonecold357 View Post
    I appreciate your feedback & input, it is what I was thinking. Can't wait to start back.
    Thank you Misciagno!

    Thank you Will, that was precisely what I was thinking!
    I use heavy barbell training almost daily in the clinic for rehab, but I am judicious about who gets it prescribed. If liability wasn't an issue, I could find a benefit for virtually everyone of them.....except for the ALS patients, of course.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Hasn't stopped my training at all. Just OHP 200 last week after having my labrum repaired from playing water polo in college. I don't bench press regularly with a barbell but I'll use the dumbells for sets of 10-12 with 80+ lbs without problem. Every now and then I'll do close grip bench press and I can rep 200 for over 10 reps easy without training it at all and I can do 5x5 chin ups with a 45 hanging from me (250 lb bodyweight).

    What I'm getting at is that pressing heavy and lots of chins has done nothing but help me. Everyone's different but attitude and willingness to push hard will take you far in this just like anything else.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Califon, NJ
    Posts
    1,449

    Default

    I got a SLAP tear from a nasty mtn bike crash about 5 years ago. It hurt like hell and my shoulder was very unstable for a few months but I began training when I could and now I don't even remember what shoulder I injured. I can bench, press overhead, chin and do dislocates without issue. I wouldn't to dumbell presses, it can feel unstable at the top. I can bench 300+ and press 200+. 31yo.
    It was my right, I have a little bump from the a-c separation.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •