The Movies The Movies - Page 51

starting strength gym
Page 51 of 278 FirstFirst ... 41495051525361101151 ... LastLast
Results 501 to 510 of 2780

Thread: The Movies

  1. #501
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Lakeland, FL
    Posts
    3,065

    Default

    • starting strength seminar august 2022
    • starting strength seminar october 2022
    • starting strength seminar december 2022
    Quote Originally Posted by Giri View Post
    But they are so emotionally dry in general that I never found The Shining to be even remotely scary.
    I think that it works in The Shining though because of the particular way Jack cracks.

  2. #502
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    763

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    I really do not understand why Stephen King is considered a horror writer.
    Right.....

    Carrie was a period piece.
    Pet Sematary and Cujo are promotional pieces for PETA.
    And Salem's Lot is?

    What do you consider horror? It's clearly more than just slasher films.

  3. #503
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    5,659

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spacediver View Post
    2001's an excellent movie. First time I watched it, I was bombarded with devastating insights. I was slightly high, so that probably played a role.
    Quote Originally Posted by Giri View Post
    Somehow 2001: A Space Odyssey always strikes as a technically accomplished, cold, analytical, calculating to the minutest detail and occasionally carrying a bit of intellectual pretense.
    I think Kubrick just worked with a palette of emotions not often encountered in film.

    I've always found 2001 deeply moving. In many of his films he conveys the emotions associated with existential & metaphysical awe & dread. He doesn't give pat authorial answers, catharsis or emotional salves. But when I watch his shit I think "this dude speaks my language". I just get it.

    The ambiguity of 2001 has attracted lots of witless, pretentious commentary from blowhards, but I don't think the film itself is pretentious. I think it's fucking beautiful. And haunting.

  4. #504
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    38

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jburke View Post
    Roger fucking that!

    R. Lee Ermy was a USMC Drill Instructor and he convinced Kubrick (sp?) to let him ad lib most of his lines.

    Saw the movie when it was released and my wife insisted that I let go for her hand vice insisting holding hands all the way through. She said I was squeezing her hand all during the boot phase.

    Not in Hue City but a friend of mine drove a flame tank there (not a grunt) and he was not impressed with that half.
    Not a movie. But an excellent graphic novel written by a former Marine of my generation, is "The White Donkey" by Maximillian Uriarte.

    I suspect the content of the book would resonate with Marines of any era.

  5. #505
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    323

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spacediver View Post
    2001's an excellent movie. First time I watched it, I was bombarded with devastating insights. I was slightly high, so that probably played a role. For some reason, the scene with Heywood Floyd and the red chairs always stuck out to me. I was struck by how relaxed his body language was.
    Funny, I thought 2001 was one of the worst "great movies" ever made. Came out when I was a kid, so never saw it in theaters. After that, you'd have to catch it on TV, since no VCRs yet. Tried watching it at least 4 times, always fell asleep. Once I finally saw it, I was pretty underwhelmed. Found the pacing to be way too slow, and just overall a boring movie. Never tried to watch it again, since then.

    Felt the same way about Blade Runner. Never saw it til MANY years after it came out, and was surprised, given its cult status, at how bad I thought it was. After that, I came up with a theory, that any movie or TV show that's dependent on special effects and portrayals of "tech", can't be highly regarded if you don't see it for the first time until it's quite old. Probably why my kids roll their eyes at original Star Trek episodes

  6. #506
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Garage of GainzZz
    Posts
    2,829

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    In contrast, I could not finish Solaris, and I've watched 2001 at least 30 times.
    If you haven't already, read the book.

  7. #507
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    48,811

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Strega View Post
    What do you consider horror?
    Movies that are scary. None have been written by Stephen King.

    Quote Originally Posted by SeanThornton View Post
    Funny, I thought 2001 was one of the worst "great movies" ever made. Came out when I was a kid, so never saw it in theaters. After that, you'd have to catch it on TV, since no VCRs yet. Tried watching it at least 4 times, always fell asleep. Once I finally saw it, I was pretty underwhelmed. Found the pacing to be way too slow, and just overall a boring movie. Never tried to watch it again, since then.

    Felt the same way about Blade Runner. Never saw it til MANY years after it came out, and was surprised, given its cult status, at how bad I thought it was. After that, I came up with a theory, that any movie or TV show that's dependent on special effects and portrayals of "tech", can't be highly regarded if you don't see it for the first time until it's quite old. Probably why my kids roll their eyes at original Star Trek episodes
    Amazing. You didn't like Blade Runner because you thought it was dependent on special effects. Amazing.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Hanley View Post
    The ambiguity of 2001 has attracted lots of witless, pretentious commentary from blowhards, but I don't think the film itself is pretentious. I think it's fucking beautiful. And haunting.
    You either get it, or you don't.

  8. #508
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    1,003

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Movies that are scary. None have been written by Stephen King.
    I found Jerusalem's Lot pretty scary (first story in Night Shift). The author's foreword in that book is pretty awesome too.


    Quote Originally Posted by SeanThornton View Post
    Funny, I thought 2001 was one of the worst "great movies" ever made. Came out when I was a kid, so never saw it in theaters. After that, you'd have to catch it on TV, since no VCRs yet. Tried watching it at least 4 times, always fell asleep. Once I finally saw it, I was pretty underwhelmed. Found the pacing to be way too slow, and just overall a boring movie. Never tried to watch it again, since then.
    It's a movie that requires a commitment on the part of the viewer to sustained high levels of attention. Were you able to enjoy the first hour of Alien (1979)?

  9. #509
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Michigan
    Posts
    1,025

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeanThornton View Post
    Felt the same way about Blade Runner. Never saw it til MANY years after it came out, and was surprised, given its cult status, at how bad I thought it was. After that, I came up with a theory, that any movie or TV show that's dependent on special effects and portrayals of "tech", can't be highly regarded if you don't see it for the first time until it's quite old. Probably why my kids roll their eyes at original Star Trek episodes
    I wasn't born until three years after Blade Runner was released... didn't see it until I was in my 20's... and yet it was obvious to me that it's a masterpiece. I also appreciated how it had clearly been a strong influence on some of what was already my favorite films and media before seeing it. The melding of a film noir aesthetic with a futuristic dystopia is a format that shows up in Dark City, The Matrix, and even my favorite computer game that I loved as a teenager, Deus Ex.

  10. #510
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    A simple documentary on Netflix: "Buck"

    It's about Buck Brannaman, the man who inspired the Horse Whisperer. Look closely and I think you'll find a similarity in his mannerisms to Rip.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •