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Thread: Podcast: Losing Weight and Getting Strong with Leah Lutz

  1. #1
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    Default Podcast: Losing Weight and Getting Strong with Leah Lutz


  2. #2
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    Ripp, you almost seem charming in this podcast. What's going on?!

    To those of us who have gotten under the bar and transformed our lives it all seems so very simple. The objective reality is that it is incredibly simple. It's not always easy, but you always know what needs to be done. Interesting that you touched on the difference in psychology between a fat person and and a non-fat person. In my opinion there is this same psychological gap between weak people and strong people as well. It's incredible how relating such a basic concept to a fat/weak person is like trying to scale a mountain range. You can present them with the facts, but to make them understand and internalize the information without having done the training is a large feat. I think this podcast is a good resource for breaching that gap.

    Quick question: What is the significance of that fluffy orangutan in these podcasts?

  3. #3
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    Inspiring story, and great lifts!

    Rip, you say that fat people lack the discipline needed to lose weight. While this may be technically true, it's also important to acknowledge that the often malfunctioning appetite regulation systems of fat people means the amount of "discipline" required can often be gigantic. You make it seem like fat people have less discipline than non fat people, yet I don't think this is always the case.

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    Leah would be an inspiration even if she hadn't been obese to start. She routinely outworks us guys in the Competitive Training Logs section of the forum, and I feel like a total pussy after reading her workouts and seeing the volume she handles. That she started where she did just makes her that much more impressive.

  5. #5
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    I loved the opportunity to do this!

    I've had lots of interesting interactions about the podcast, and outside of the conversation about the ideas of weight loss and strength training, a lot of people have asked me about the word "fat" in the podcast. It surprises people, and many have asked if that part of the conversation bothered me, so I thought I'd mention something here. The answer is no, it does not bother me at all. In fact a very important part of being in a mental place to make hard changes and to stick with them was finally wrapping my head around and fully accepting the fact that I was indeed fat. No quotations, no question, no excuses, and no comparison to anyone or any other situation. I was in fact morbidly obese, and it took a long time for me to let those words come out of my mouth without stumbling over them. But I had to fully accept where I was before I was able to commit to working hard to change.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by spacediver View Post
    Inspiring story, and great lifts!

    Rip, you say that fat people lack the discipline needed to lose weight. While this may be technically true, it's also important to acknowledge that the often malfunctioning appetite regulation systems of fat people means the amount of "discipline" required can often be gigantic. You make it seem like fat people have less discipline than non fat people, yet I don't think this is always the case.
    The lay "understanding" of this is far more developed than the science should allow for. Yes, an obese person will have a biological control system calibrated in a way that makes losing weight very difficult. However, the scientific understanding of how the obese person got there in the first place is very murky. It is entirely possible that it was a formerly functioning biological control system that became dysfunctional primarily as a result of personal choice.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by LimieJosh View Post
    The lay "understanding" of this is far more developed than the science should allow for. Yes, an obese person will have a biological control system calibrated in a way that makes losing weight very difficult. However, the scientific understanding of how the obese person got there in the first place is very murky. It is entirely possible that it was a formerly functioning biological control system that became dysfunctional primarily as a result of personal choice.
    I didn't mean to imply that the reason they got obese in the first place is always due to appetite dysregulation (one notable exception would be a pathological pituitary gland). Just that once they're there, things can get whacky.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aryah View Post
    Ripp, you almost seem charming in this podcast. What's going on?!
    Don't let his forum gruff fool you.

    Quote Originally Posted by spacediver View Post
    Inspiring story, and great lifts!

    Rip, you say that fat people lack the discipline needed to lose weight. While this may be technically true, it's also important to acknowledge that the often malfunctioning appetite regulation systems of fat people means the amount of "discipline" required can often be gigantic. You make it seem like fat people have less discipline than non fat people, yet I don't think this is always the case.
    I know you're talking to Rip here, but...when push comes to shove, there are all kinds of factors that can affect one's relationship with food and over-eating. He had me on because he knows it wasn't easy, and it's admittedly a huge task. But what are you going to outside of habitually controlling and changing your food habits? As we discussed that is HARD to do, but it is a simple idea. My brain could easily get filled with a gazillion distracting reasons, fears, ideas, potential causes, etc. But I had to learn to stop making excuses, stop thinking things didn't really matter, and I had to fight hard. So I had to apply discipline to this area of my life. It's not that I had zero to begin with, and I think this is pretty common. Interestingly, many people told me after the fact that they were always surprised that I had gained so much weight, and they see my current food habits as far more fitting with my pretty type A, organized, disciplined personality. So one can have plenty of discipline in their life and still be fat, no question.

    Quote Originally Posted by KyleMask View Post
    Leah would be an inspiration even if she hadn't been obese to start. She routinely outworks us guys in the Competitive Training Logs section of the forum, and I feel like a total pussy after reading her workouts and seeing the volume she handles. That she started where she did just makes her that much more impressive.
    Wow, thanks, Kyle. You probably wouldn't be so impressed if you heard my whining at the end of every single volume block. I keep thinking I'm going to handle it better, but...I routinely tell Jordan it's too difficult, that I can't do it, that I must be over-trained, blah, blah, blah...I think it takes a special kind of person to coach a female competitor and my awesome swing of emotions before every meet.

  9. #9
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    Great inspiration.I didn't know about her full story of lifting career but it's amazing than i knew.I will share this amazing story to my clients and friends.Awesome job Leah.

  10. #10
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    "Displace the goal of weight loss for the goal of performance"

    Rip, there's your next t-shirt.

    You've made profound statements but I believe this is one of your best. Improving my performance has made me stronger physically and mentally. Which has translated into me being a better dad and husband and I'm just getting started.

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