Is running enough for leg strength? Answers for your brother-in-law. Is running enough for leg strength? Answers for your brother-in-law.

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Thread: Is running enough for leg strength? Answers for your brother-in-law.

  1. #1
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    Default Is running enough for leg strength? Answers for your brother-in-law.


  2. #2
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    Addresses distance running and the brother-in-law but what about sprinting? I would guess that sprinting increases strength but caps out at "X". Along those lines would lifting improve sprinting? A lot of it just seems to be a genetic gift, you are either fast in short distances or you are not. Just my guess, but don't know of any studies one way or the other.

  3. #3
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    Haven't heard this old chestnut in a while!

  4. #4
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    Rip looked pretty lean in the picture, though. Pre-SS I take it?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strega View Post
    Addresses distance running and the brother-in-law but what about sprinting? I would guess that sprinting increases strength but caps out at "X". Along those lines would lifting improve sprinting? A lot of it just seems to be a genetic gift, you are either fast in short distances or you are not. Just my guess, but don't know of any studies one way or the other.
    Generally, lifting will improve sprinting. There are many cases of young football players doing the linear progression, adding 100 lbs to their squat but not running, and then setting a personal record in the 40 yard dash afterwards.

    As for why sprinting alone is not enough for building leg strength, there are several reasons, depending on how much detail you want to get in.

    SHORT ANSWER FOR BROTHER IN LAW: The leg drive in a sprint or a jump doesnít last long enough for full recruitment of the involved muscle mass, and it doesnít keep that muscle under full load for a full range of motion, which is necessary for effective long term progress.

    If the brother in law actually wants to learn things you could go into more detail on that and touch on other factors that make sprinting and jumping poor for strength gains such as:
    1) Inability to carefully control the load as with a barbell
    2) Difficulty getting enough effective volume since explosiveness drops off more quickly with fatigue than the ability to grind out reps.
    3) Lack of eccentric loading which will limit strength gains
    4) Higher impact on the joints due to ballistic components

    Iím sure there is more, but thatís what I have off the top of my head.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl Schudt
    Up to 60% of this comes from stored elastic energy (3), so itís more like 180lbs of force from each legís contractile tissues. This is still considerable, right? Why isnít that enough to make me strong? After all, that would be a 340lb squat.
    Shouldn't that be 360 lb?

  7. #7
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    Running reduces leg strength over the short term.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mgilchrest View Post
    Rip/Karl,

    Should it also be considered that the aim for most folks who are running/jogging is to lose weight?

    i.e. Not only is running not an exercise that progressively overloads the legs for force production, during the "novice" phase for most folks keen on running, it's the exact opposite since they are required to produce less force over time. Moreover, this could straight up lead to a catabolic environment in short order. Thus, running could actually reduce leg strength over the long term?
    The arguments I usually hear for running are losing weight, cardiovascular health and overall health. I rarely if ever hear strength as a reason.

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