Populations who should not train? Populations who should not train? - Page 3

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Thread: Populations who should not train?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm should not train. People with the flu should stay home. Likewise, people with ebola. Patients with osteoarthritis and RA must train, if they want some of their lives back.
    I have a variant of RA. Barbell training has made my daily life appreciably easier/better.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcollage View Post
    She will probably die by dropping a 25 pound dumbbell on her head while bouncing on a bosu ball.
    An unclean death. Hurry home.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon Sullivan View Post
    But now the interwebZ and sundry orthopods have convinced him that deads and squats will surely cause his artificial hip to disintegrate, and I can't point to any definitive data that says it won't (he's a physician....I'm getting more of them). So in spite of the fact that he can barely squat 110 yet, and really needs this training, I'm probably going to lose him.

    We still have so much work to do.
    This has to be so frustrating to you as a coach. I'm frustrated just reading it.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon Sullivan View Post
    Right now I've got a wonderful client, 65, a very coachable and affable man, but with profound sarcopenia, deconditioned and weak as hell, who is making slow, careful, steady progress. I really love working with him. I built my coaching practice for people just like him.

    But now the interwebZ and sundry orthopods have convinced him that deads and squats will surely cause his artificial hip to disintegrate, and I can't point to any definitive data that says it won't (he's a physician....I'm getting more of them). So in spite of the fact that he can barely squat 110 yet, and really needs this training, I'm probably going to lose him.

    We still have so much work to do.
    That is pretty bizarre. Is there a proposed mechanism by which the implanted artificial hip will be destroyed, and which you can walk through in a logical way and debunk?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by crabcakelover View Post
    I have a son with a chronic neuromuscular disease (mitochondrial encephamyopathy with muscle CoQ10 deficiency diagnosed by muscle biopsy) who I have helped train since he was 14, which is the earliest age my gym will allow some one use free weights.

    He cannot do the strict Starting Strength lifts at any weight because he has low coordination and he has language difficulties which make it hard for him to use verbal prompts. He uses a leg press machine instead of squatting. I would love to find a way for him to do some sort of modified dead lift -- any ideas out there?

    His favorite exercise has been a pseudo press done on a bench like this:

    http://allthingsrecreation.com/wp-co...t-Machines.jpg

    He began only being able to lift the handles which he would do with the palms of his hands, because his grip was too weak to actually grasp the handles. Now, after 3 years of doing this 3 days a week his personal record is 150 lbs (75 lbs on each side)! His form is not great, so he does sets of 1 and holds them for a few seconds, and I have to slightly push against his abdomen while he does them since he is still learning to brace himself with his abs,

    Over 3 years his leg press has also gone from 30 lbs to a personal record of 310 lbs, Most days, he refuses to do any bench press equivalent, so he has made little progress there.

    He hated doing thiese lifts at first, but after about six weeks when he started to see his numbers go up, he really got into it and has enthusiastically stuck with it ever since. Now he is the one who wants to set a personal record. Not me.

    An added benefit to his training is that while most of his teen age classmates with disabilities are now on meds to control their mood swings (most of which cause huge weight gains) we have so far been able to keep him off of psychoactive drugs,. Thank God.

    My advice to those with loved ones with disabilities is find some way, any way, to have them lift with a goal toward lifting serious weight. It greatly improves their quality of life and by extension, yours.
    That's a DAD right there. Gave me Throat Lump.

  6. #26
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    So, to be clear (better safe than sorry): can somebody who had kidney failure (both, 10 years ago) train?
    I ask this because I am to put my girlfriend's mother on the novice program and show her the exercises.

  7. #27
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    She's on dialysis?

  8. #28
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    She isn't anymore but she still has a fistula in her left arm that can cause her pain during some movements. So, apparently, deadlifts will be an issue.

  9. #29
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    Is there a weight she can deadlift without pain?

  10. #30
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    I don't know. We have not started yet. I was asked to "train" her just yesterday. She is 50 or so and she badly needs to be stronger.

    My girlfriend told me that doing a bicep curl makes her forearm hurt so I guess that it might be an issue for deadlifts when it gets heavy. We will see.

    I will keep you posted in another thread so not to hijack this thread too much.

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