Adductors Function in Squats: Adductors Function in Squats:

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  1. #1
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    Default Adductors Function in Squats:

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    Hello there,

    I've been going over your book starting strength for the past couple of days. Now there is a slight confusion I've encountered that if you could elaborate on it will be really helpful.

    On page 48, you talk about the adductor muscles and you mention that they act (other than adduction) as extensors. But any anatomy book I've checked before says that these muscles are adductors and hip FLEXORS with the exception of the adductor magnus which has a hip extension function.

    Specifically this sentence is what I don't understand: "..., So the concentric action of the adductor muscles thus produce hip extension..."

    I'm sorry if this seems like an irrelevant detail that wont really affect executing the lifts but I'm just interested in knowing your point on the matter.


    Thanks

    Best regards,
    Ben

  2. #2
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    First I've heard of this. Do these anatomists squat?

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    It all depends on the position of the thigh on whether it functions as a secondary hip extensor or not. Our method of squatting causes the adductors to do this, whereas a squat with the toes pointing straight ahead and not pushing the knees out, wouldn't incorporate this secondary action.

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    Don't the adductors connect behind the hip joint? That would cause contraction to extend the hips rather than flex them.

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    I have seen texts that give both an extension and flexion function to certain adductor muscles depending on the location of the muscle's proximal attachment on the pubis. However, because the adductor magnus has a proximal attachment at the ischial tuberosity (the same proximal attachment on the pelvis as the hamstrings), it unquestionably contributes to hip extension. Being that the magnus is the largest and strongest adductor, I don't think it matters much if the other adductors contribute a little bit to either flexion or extension as their contribution is minimal due to their relatively poor leverage in most positions.

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    It's cos of the stretch reflex, mangggggg. If you stretch a band out in a straight line, it'll snap back. If you stretch out a band the same length and spread it out at the ends, too, it snaps back quicker, mang. Das how dat works, maneeeee. Otherwise, Ripdawg wouldn't tell people to push their knees out for a stretchier stretch reflex, maneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee.

    What are the preceding sentences, if I may ask? In texts, sentences are best read in paragraphs in chapters. Paragraphs convey a meaning and are made up of individual sentences that contrast new information with old information. Specifically, the linking adverbial of result "thus" denotes a result taking place (hence the name), meaning a previous sentence would have included some information that would lead to the justified use of the adverbial. If you just say "I have a dog, thus I eat bacon every morning", you're misusing the adverbial as the two main clauses aren't connected by cause and effect.

    So I'd like to know what comes before the sentence quoted. Maybe "the eccentric action of the adductor muscles produces hip flexion" or something like that. I'd look it up, myself, but I gave my version to my brother to read.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Morris View Post
    It all depends on the position of the thigh on whether it functions as a secondary hip extensor or not. Our method of squatting causes the adductors to do this
    My copy of Clemente (Anatomy, A Regional Atlas of the Human Body) has a very clear diagram marking the origin of the hip adductors on the anterior aspect of the pubic ramus of the hip and their insertions on the posterior aspect of the femur. Will appears absolutely correct. In the neutral anatomic position (standing upright, arms to the side, palms turned anteriorly) the adductors clearly function as hip flexors. However, in a squat, with the hips already deeply flexed, the adductors would appear to function as hip extensors.

    The anatomy books presumably describe all muscle movement from the "anatomic position". That's why the hip adductors are described as flexors. It's been a long time since I took gross anatomy but I think Will's interpretation (and SSBBT) is correct.

    Bottom line, anatomists DON'T squat. They just stand around like mannequins with their hands forward as they get ready to ask for a handout.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scaldrew View Post
    It's cos of the stretch reflex, mangggggg. If you stretch a band out in a straight line, it'll snap back. If you stretch out a band the same length and spread it out at the ends, too, it snaps back quicker, mang. Das how dat works, maneeeee. Otherwise, Ripdawg wouldn't tell people to push their knees out for a stretchier stretch reflex, maneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee.
    .
    I enjoyed this very much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JFord View Post

    The anatomy books presumably describe all muscle movement from the "anatomic position".
    A very important note with regards to anatomy texts.

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    Thank you all for your answers

    So basically, because in squats the adductors are flexed they contribute in extension while the books only explain the anatomic position motions. And most of the extension is caused by adductor Magnus (which is what I've mentioned from the start)

    And the full paragraph from SS book doesn't really change the meaning of the quotation I've added in my original question...

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