Exercise Oncology: Barbell Training vs. Everything Else Exercise Oncology: Barbell Training vs. Everything Else

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Thread: Exercise Oncology: Barbell Training vs. Everything Else

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2017
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    10

    Default Exercise Oncology: Barbell Training vs. Everything Else

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    Hello Rip,
    I am an exercise physiology student at Ohio State University (which i know you think may be a waste of time but i'm trying my best to focus on information that actually makes sense), recently i have become fascinated with exercise oncology and I am hoping to eventually perform research on the effectiveness of barbell training vs other types of training within this population for increased quality of life during and after treatment and longevity of survivorship. What is your opinion regarding why or why not you think barbell strength training would be more effective in this population. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
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    39,291

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    I am working with a guy right now who was diagnosed 22 months ago with Stage IV kidney cancer, was told at the time to get his affairs in order. I told him that as long as you are maintaining bodyweight (about 270) and getting stronger, you are not dying of cancer. He has had about 4 rounds of chemotherapy, a kidney removed, trained through all of them, still has cancer, and is neither dead, weaker, or lighter. He came in one day and said his feet hurt pretty bad, and I told him that mine did too, "Get your fat ass under the bar." Doesn't feel good, but what the hell? Not dead. And he is not the first person to take this approach, which is in complete defiance of all the usual medical advice. Good luck with your project, it will be useful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    357

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    Achieving the best physical shape possible, for which strength training is a great contributor, is definitely the current medical recommendation for cancer diseases. Information flow is slow to every physician, though.

  4. #4
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    Aug 2013
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    Dallas, TX
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    56 year old stage 4 throat cancer survivor here. Doc says it came from an HPV virus I got, most probably decades ago.
    Last week at my 3 month post chemo/radiation checkup, he said, and I quote:
    "Right now you are where most people are 3 years out from treatment. PET scan is totally clean, I can't even see any scar tissue in your neck. Keep up the diet and exercise."

    I had lost about 20 lbs from the treatment, have gained back almost 10. The more lean mass you have going into and thru treatment, the higher the chance of survival and better outcome. Several studies out there to prove this, some of the MD coaches and member can give more info if needed.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    379

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    He came in one day and said his feet hurt pretty bad, and I told him that mine did too, "Get your fat ass under the bar." Doesn't feel good, but what the hell? Not dead.

    Freaking brilliant in its simplicity. Amazing line. This goes on the Mount Rushmore of Rip quotes.
    I needed to read this so that I will shut up and get under the bar.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    South of Austin, TEXAS
    Posts
    73

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    I'm keenly interested in this topic. My Mom passed away last month from bile duct and liver cancer. From the time she started feeling bad, got diagnosed, spent some time in ICU, did hospice, and passed away was about 4 weeks. She had trouble eating because of the bile duct issues, and it was shocking how fast she lost weight and strength. I don't know that if she was stronger it would have made a huge difference in her ultimate outcome. However, it was a BIG wakeup call for me that I needed to quit messing around and get as strong as possible. The day I got back home after the funeral I contacted the Barbell Medicine team and just started working with Leah. My hope is that I'll be strong enough so if I'm ever facing a disease like that I can handle the treatments.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,575

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    I've told the comparison before so I'll keep the short version.

    Father in law spent 15 years circling the drain with Sick Aging Phenotype, the last five literally in bed, and last year toothless as they all rotted away.
    His brother, two years younger, gardened and puttered his retirement; had a massive stroke and was gone in 36 hours.
    They died within a week of each other.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    18

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    This thread is truly inspirational.

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