79 year old mother refuses to train. 79 year old mother refuses to train. - Page 2

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Thread: 79 year old mother refuses to train.

  1. #11
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    I have a different problem. My mom (73) understands that she needs to lift. She has started taking whey and doing some better-than-nothing lifting (e.g.: dumbell deadlifts) with a marginally better-than-nothing trainer, but she just can't find anyone who'll train her on the major lifts and track her progress. I bought her Sully's book but it seems to scare trainers away. The search continues.

  2. #12
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    It's really bad that her doctor talked her out of a training program. But it also sounds like she was looking for a way out already. I have a hard time with this one, because I meet virtually zero patients who are willing to do what it takes to stop being in pain and start having a life that doesn't consist of cruising around the house like a toddler (cruising is what toddlers do when they first learn to walk - hanging on to things as they go. Old people start doing this when their strength starts to fade below a critical threshold that makes simply walking across the living room floor a terrifying experience for them). They all like to say that "doctors" can't figure out how to make them stop hurting. Maybe most can't, but my thought on that one is that I can tell you what would help, but you won't do it, so ...

    And these are just the old people. The younger people in their 30s, 40s and 50s ... where to even begin?

  3. #13
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    Muntz. Just my humble opinion, but, research a doctor to get a "second" (aka different) opinion from.
    Maybe this doesn't "solve the problem" but opinions are like something else, everyone has one.
    But just like a lawyer, know the answer before you ask the question.

    BTW: a directory of doctors who lift would be valuable.

  4. #14
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    I have a torn meniscus, and obviously have/ had some pain, while squatting. First half a year I even had a hard time walking on stairs. One of the reason to begin training was exactly this issue(wish I heard about SS 5 - 6 years ago...). One day I went to my mothers chiropractor, who - god bless him and his hands - is helping her to cope with her back pain. I said him when I'm squatting more than 40 - 50 kg, I have a knee pain. He just told me, "then do more reps with this weight". Obviously, he didn't hear about a thing called good or bad technique, otherwise he'd know that there are people lifting 500+ LB with serious knee problems. Of course, no prescription for back pain, except walking. Deadlift? Barbell rows?? Noo, it's for those young weird boys, not for you, ma'am.

    PS: and I love your stories, mates. Happy to hear I'm not alone with this problem of convincing parents to begin training, even when they're pretty young. A lot of health and happiness to everyone of them.

  5. #15
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    The real hell of it is that we shouldn't have to educate doctors. The biomedical literature itself should educate them, because it's packed with data showing the benefit and safety of strength training in aging populations--even the oldest of the old. As far as I'm concerned, the doctor in the OP is no better than one who still uses clonidine as first line therapy for hypertension, or still withholds analgesia from the acute abdomen, or still uses leeches for cholecystitis.

    This is not just aggravating, it's unforgiveable. This is bad medicine. This physician has done his patient an enormous disservice, and he will continue to do so, and there's absolutely nothing anybody can do to stop him. It's maddening.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon Sullivan View Post
    The real hell of it is that we shouldn't have to educate doctors.

    This is not just aggravating, it's unforgiveable. This is bad medicine. This physician has done his patient an enormous disservice, and he will continue to do so, and there's absolutely nothing anybody can do to stop him. It's maddening.
    I have had EXTENSIVE interactions with doctors across multiple specialties lately. Some of them are truly astounding with their depth of knowledge, caring, and skill. They saved my brother's life through 18 days in the ICU and I am deeply grateful to them.

    However, some are so ignorant as to make you wonder if they are qualified to prescribe aspirin. God knows how they ever passed the boards. By and large their knowledge of strength and conditioning--and its profound effects on recovery and rehab--is utterly non-existent.

  7. #17
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    I've written about SWMBO before and her chronic pain issues and inability to walk more than three minutes on a treadmill set at 1MPH. I did finally get her on a CBD oil regimen which has easily and relatively cheaply decreased her pain and increased her ability to move unassisted.

    I'd have thought my losing weight, getting stronger, and surviving all the heinous bullshit would have been proof enough, but it's still protein powder is dangerous, creatine will kill my kidneys, and lifting weights causes all sorts of joint damage despite clear evidence though me and my closely-monitored bloodwork showing none of these asinine statements are remotely true.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon Sullivan View Post
    The real hell of it is that we shouldn't have to educate doctors. The biomedical literature itself should educate them, because it's packed with data showing the benefit and safety of strength training in aging populations--even the oldest of the old. As far as I'm concerned, the doctor in the OP is no better than one who still uses clonidine as first line therapy for hypertension, or still withholds analgesia from the acute abdomen, or still uses leeches for cholecystitis.

    This is not just aggravating, it's unforgiveable. This is bad medicine. This physician has done his patient an enormous disservice, and he will continue to do so, and there's absolutely nothing anybody can do to stop him. It's maddening.
    Couldn't you accuse him of malpractice and have some organisation investigate, maybe ultimately getting his licence revoked? I believe you when you say there's nothing you can do cos I really don't know, but is there really no recourse other than maybe the legal one after the OP's mother has suffered for a specific period of time?

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon Sullivan View Post
    The real hell of it is that we shouldn't have to educate doctors. The biomedical literature itself should educate them, because it's packed with data showing the benefit and safety of strength training in aging populations--even the oldest of the old. As far as I'm concerned, the doctor in the OP is no better than one who still uses clonidine as first line therapy for hypertension, or still withholds analgesia from the acute abdomen, or still uses leeches for cholecystitis.

    This is not just aggravating, it's unforgiveable. This is bad medicine. This physician has done his patient an enormous disservice, and he will continue to do so, and there's absolutely nothing anybody can do to stop him. It's maddening.
    A personal pet peeve of mine as well. I absolutely hate the daily occurrence of uncontrolled hypertension in the hospital. I already know without looking at the med rec what they are on. It's always lisinopril and metoprolol, and often oral hydralazine and clonidine. Sometimes sometimes they get creative and put them on losartan. Gee, I wonder why their hypertension is uncontrolled? It wouldn't have anything to do with your crap choice of meds?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon Sullivan View Post
    The real hell of it is that we shouldn't have to educate doctors. The biomedical literature itself should educate them, because it's packed with data showing the benefit and safety of strength training in aging populations--even the oldest of the old. As far as I'm concerned, the doctor in the OP is no better than one who still uses clonidine as first line therapy for hypertension, or still withholds analgesia from the acute abdomen, or still uses leeches for cholecystitis.

    This is not just aggravating, it's unforgiveable. This is bad medicine. This physician has done his patient an enormous disservice, and he will continue to do so, and there's absolutely nothing anybody can do to stop him. It's maddening.
    Thanks Sully - I've been sending her (and my wife) your videos and would give her the book if I thought there was any chance she'd read it. I'm curious, however. Have you heard of strength training causing her arthritis to act up? She is very deconditioned - never did anything athletic in her life. Could the trainer have pushed her too hard? Does the thing about training "activating arthritis under knee caps" make any sense to you? Can you give me a specific counter argument for that?

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