79 year old mother refuses to train. 79 year old mother refuses to train. - Page 3

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Thread: 79 year old mother refuses to train.

  1. #21
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    • texas seminar date
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    Agree with everything that's been said so far, and that this doctor is an embarrassment. However...

    Quote Originally Posted by muntz View Post
    "I told him that on Saturday we only worked on upper body bec of knee issues and now I couldnt hold a coffee cup with one hand."
    What was she doing in those sessions? This kinda sounds like the aftereffects of a classic personal trainer pump routine, which is painful enough for a 35 year old, and could wreck your mom. I don't get the impression Sully's clients feel dysfunctional after training.

  2. #22
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    Dear Muntz,

    I'm sorry you are going through this with your mom. I lost my beloved grandmother, who was like a second mother to me because she raised me with my mother, because she refused to exercise. Not a day goes by that I don't wish I had done more. That is one of the pivotal experiences that inspired me to leave academia and choose strength coaching as a second career.

    The best advice I've read thus far on this thread is for you to find another doctor who will give her a second opinion and supplant the injurious opinion of her current doctor with advice that will save your Mom's life. There are a paltry few doctors out there that support vigorous exercise for Masters. Find one, whatever the cost.

    To this excellent advice, I would only add that you should never give up trying. Don't make it into a pitched battle. Never harangue your Mom. It is her life to live and her mind to make. But never give up. Make it plainly evident to her that your concern is coming from a place of love and concern. Read Thomas' Do Not Go Gentle to her. Hold her tight and tell her you love her and don't want to lose her. Help her perform the basic four exercises with BW and a mop pole if you have to. Let her know that this is a matter of life and death importance, because it is.

    Wishing you and your mother many more strong years,

    Francisco

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scaldrew View Post
    Couldn't you accuse him of malpractice and have some organisation investigate, maybe ultimately getting his licence revoked?
    Here's the truly shitty part: the Doctor is operating well within the Standards of Practice for his profession in 2017. There is quite literally nothing that can be done to him professionally because as far as the medical profession is concerned he has done absolutely nothing wrong. And I really don't think that he should be sanctioned officially. He needs to be educated, not killed. There are other doctors, after all, and as shitty as this may sound in this case, the patient has responsibilities too.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Here's the truly shitty part: the Doctor is operating well within the Standards of Practice for his profession in 2017. There is quite literally nothing that can be done to him professionally because as far as the medical profession is concerned he has done absolutely nothing wrong. And I really don't think that he should be sanctioned officially. He needs to be educated, not killed. There are other doctors, after all, and as shitty as this may sound in this case, the patient has responsibilities too.
    Knowing my mom, I guarantee you this Dr is highly respected, credentialed, has access to the finest hospitals, graduated from the most prestigious schools, etc.

    I'll check out the exercises he's prescribed her and see if I can help w/those.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by muntz View Post
    Thanks Sully - I've been sending her (and my wife) your videos and would give her the book if I thought there was any chance she'd read it. I'm curious, however. Have you heard of strength training causing her arthritis to act up? She is very deconditioned - never did anything athletic in her life. Could the trainer have pushed her too hard? Does the thing about training "activating arthritis under knee caps" make any sense to you? Can you give me a specific counter argument for that?
    It's the doctor who should give the argument--where is the data that performing these exercises correctly "activates arthritis under the knee caps" any more than just living to be 60? And how does he respond to the work of Hartmann, not to mention dozens of others who report that exercise improves the symptoms of arthritis, if not the underlying pathology?

    FFS, I have this condition (chondromalacia patella). Strength training makes my knees feel better, and stronger, and more mobile. It acts up when I don't train.

    We do have to wonder, however, if the "trainer" was competent to coach the correct model. Improperly performed squats can definitely piss off a knee. So there may be two ignorant assholes in play here, with a concommitant stupidity-multiplying effect.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon Sullivan View Post
    FFS, I have this condition (chondromalacia patella). Strength training makes my knees feel better, and stronger, and more mobile. It acts up when I don't train.
    Your knee condition is due to a weak core and improperly firing glutes. What you really need is functional strength training.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Here's the truly shitty part: the Doctor is operating well within the Standards of Practice for his profession in 2017. There is quite literally nothing that can be done to him professionally because as far as the medical profession is concerned he has done absolutely nothing wrong. And I really don't think that he should be sanctioned officially. He needs to be educated, not killed. There are other doctors, after all, and as shitty as this may sound in this case, the patient has responsibilities too.
    I was going to respond, but I don't think I've lived long enough for my thoughts to have truly developed and organised themselves in a meaningful, communicable fashion yet. Hence I'll hold my peace and listen instead. But yeah, killing doctors over this would be extreme, unless you were referring to the idea of stripping of their licences but in the Texan way. Shoot their medical degrees with a Desert Eagle pew pew.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon Sullivan View Post
    It's the doctor who should give the argument--where is the data that performing these exercises correctly "activates arthritis under the knee caps" any more than just living to be 60? And how does he respond to the work of Hartmann, not to mention dozens of others who report that exercise improves the symptoms of arthritis, if not the underlying pathology?

    FFS, I have this condition (chondromalacia patella). Strength training makes my knees feel better, and stronger, and more mobile. It acts up when I don't train.

    We do have to wonder, however, if the "trainer" was competent to coach the correct model. Improperly performed squats can definitely piss off a knee. So there may be two ignorant assholes in play here, with a concommitant stupidity-multiplying effect.
    I hate to say it, but it might be the trainer's fault. These things acted up after just a few sessions. He's a good guy and I used him before I discovered SS (he got my squat into the low 300s and dead to high 300s in my late 40s), but his knowledge may be lacking, so far as old people go.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pluripotent View Post
    A personal pet peeve of mine as well. I absolutely hate the daily occurrence of uncontrolled hypertension in the hospital. I already know without looking at the med rec what they are on. It's always lisinopril and metoprolol, and often oral hydralazine and clonidine. Sometimes sometimes they get creative and put them on losartan. Gee, I wonder why their hypertension is uncontrolled? It wouldn't have anything to do with your crap choice of meds?
    Damn. I'm on both lisinopril and metoprolol. Losartan made my heart race and gave me anxiety. It was horrible. (I now understand how bad that is when someone says they had an anxiety attack--glad that's in the rear view mirror).

    Any other BP suggestions I might want to inquire with my doctor about?

    Thanks!

  10. #30
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    starting strength coach development program
    I always tell arthritics that they need to do some type of activity, even if it hurts. Immobility is the worst thing you can do to arthritic joints. The usual reply is an incredulous gasp and a look like "you must be crazy, don't you know it hurts?!"

    I would go farther and try to tell them what types of movements would be best, but we never make it that far into the conversation. Just one doc's experience. So far I haven't meet one who is doing squats, with correct form or otherwise. And I would never discourage it if I did. But I might give them the book. If a person is not arthritic, then pain generally means you're screwing up the form. Arthritics will need to learn to distinguish normal arthritic pain from pain caused by form problems. If it's arthritic pain, push through (this is generally where I lose them, the idea that they have to do it, even though it hurts is just too much). If the pain it's form related, fix form, obviously. If they choose to do nothing because it hurts too much, the irony is that the inactivity will only increase the pain. Sorry, but these are the only options available, aside from joint replacement once the pain and immobility become unbearable (and if they are in a position to tolerate the surgery).

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