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Thread: kyphosis

  1. #1
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    Default kyphosis

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    Hi Mark,

    I seem to be kyphotic in the thoracic area in the clean and deadlift start positions. I'm able to lock my lower back, and if I bring my butt down to a parallel squat, really tuck my lats and scapula, and crane my neck way back I can get things pretty flat, but that seems to put me in a pretty disadvantageous position leverage wise. With hips up and neck in a neutral position my mid back arches no matter how flat I try to make it.

    Is my back at risk from this mid back rounding or is it not that big a deal so long as my low back is locked?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    How old are you?

  3. #3
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    48

    My posture ain't great to begin with. I'm not a hunchback or anthing, but I've got everted feet and forward rounded shoulders. You know, my hands sorta want to hang in front like a gorilla, rather than at my sides. I'm working on the general posture, but it not an easy fix. I'm hoping some pullups and chinups will help, but right now I need a LOT of assistance to do any.

  4. #4
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    Until your weights get heavy enough that they begin to bother your thoracic spine -- and you'll know when that is before you get irreparably damaged -- I'd keep deadlifting. You might also investigate the effects of a decent physiotherapist, if you can find one; some of this may be soft tissue, and a rolfer-type approach might be helpful.

  5. #5
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    Mark, I haven't had any soft tissue work done yet, but I continue to deadlift and fight for proper position.

    Problem is, I find all the extra effort I go through while setting up taxing, so doing a continuous set of 5 deadlifts requires a lower weight than I might do if I wasn't trying so hard to flatten my back. Should I stay with a weight I can do fairly continuously for 5 reps, or is it okay to do 2 reps of 3, or something like that?

  6. #6
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    I think taxation in this situation is a good thing. Make yourself stay in position for the whole set and just revel in the fact that improvement is taking place.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    I think taxation in this situation is a good thing. Make yourself stay in position for the whole set and just revel in the fact that improvement is taking place.

    I was afraid you'd say that. I guess this is one of those situations where more weight on the bar doesn't necessarily equate to greater strength.

  8. #8
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