Advice on nagging injuries? Advice on nagging injuries?

starting strength gym
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Advice on nagging injuries?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    13

    Question Advice on nagging injuries?

    • starting strength seminar august 2021
    • starting strength seminar october 2021
    • starting strength seminar december 2021
    Hello,

    I would have some questions, if you'd have the time to answer:
    1. If an injury is somewhat bothersome in everyday life, but doesn't affect training, how would you approach it?
    2. Is there something wrong with my reasoning in the following case?

    I have some sharp, moderate pain in deep in the medial/posterior part of my right knee when I go below parallel on bodyweight squats. The pain occurs when I don't put enough pressure on the outside of my feet. With squat worksets (high 300's at 200 BW, 25yo) there is no pain.

    The pain is similar to what I had in my left knee over a year ago, after aggravating an undiagnosed medial meniscus tear by doing stupid shit at the gym. The left knee was scoped and cleared up later.

    So, since the pain seems to be related to a meniscus but it doesn't cause problems during heavy sets, I figured I would train normally and keep an eye on it.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    45,876

    Default

    Most of us over the age of 50 work through nagging injuries that do not materially affect our training every day. So, learn to train through them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Thanks, will do that!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    36

    Default

    I honestly think this is the biggest psychological benefits of weightlifting. I don't know anyone who isn't dealing with aches or pains of some sort. Most people (sadly including myself for most of my life) obsess over it and avoid activity out of fear. For those willing to train anyway, the body is not the only thing trained; the mind learns to put that shit aside and get on with our day. Then the aches and pains pass without even realizing it. The confidence gained from this is more powerful than any painkiller.

    Check out Dr. B's article on aches and pains. Best summary I've read.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    1,079

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimidasprinkla View Post
    I honestly think this is the biggest psychological benefits of weightlifting. I don't know anyone who isn't dealing with aches or pains of some sort. Most people (sadly including myself for most of my life) obsess over it and avoid activity out of fear. For those willing to train anyway, the body is not the only thing trained; the mind learns to put that shit aside and get on with our day. Then the aches and pains pass without even realizing it. The confidence gained from this is more powerful than any painkiller.

    Check out Dr. B's article on aches and pains. Best summary I've read.
    The bolded part is the most significant. Our hospitals are full of people who refuse to do just that. When you tell them that in order to get better, they have to figure out how to move (let alone train), the response is usually something along the lines of, "but you don't understand how much it hurts!" Maybe I don't. And I certainly can't feel what others feel. But is that the most important thing? Everyone keeps telling me that we need to have compassion, and they try to set up the medical school admission process to maximize compassionate doctors (doesn't work), but which pain should I be most concerned about? The pain you are going to feel now when you finally get of your ass and do something, usually after a lifetime of complete avoidance? Or the pain that I know is coming if you don't? Death is not a nice thing for anyone, and it's especially harsh on people who never bothered to take care of themselves while they had the opportunity. Whatever you are suffering now, it will most definitely pale in comparison to the orders of magnitude greater suffering you will undoubtedly endure by not addressing it now, regardless of what your current pain may be.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Provo, Utah
    Posts
    515

    Default

    My dearest friend and mentor in life once told me, "If I only worked the days I didn't have a headache I wouldn't work very much."

    That man works harder than anyone I know. His words stuck with me through many a trying moment in my life.

    I love "seeing Jesus" on the platform. No workout is complete without me doing something to absolute, grinding failure.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,575

    Default

    After open heart surgery all I wanted to do was lie in bed; nothing I'd been through in life to that point hurt as much as I did then. Three days post-op I was told "to try to walk the hall four times today". Lifting taught me waiting to want to do things means they never get done. The fifty yard round trip was more exhausting than the eight-mile ruck I'd done two weeks before. I did five trips that day, and slept in between to recover, because that's what it was going to take, over and over, to get home, and get healthy again.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    41

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimidasprinkla View Post
    I honestly think this is the biggest psychological benefits of weightlifting. I don't know anyone who isn't dealing with aches or pains of some sort. Most people (sadly including myself for most of my life) obsess over it and avoid activity out of fear. For those willing to train anyway, the body is not the only thing trained; the mind learns to put that shit aside and get on with our day. Then the aches and pains pass without even realizing it. The confidence gained from this is more powerful than any painkiller.

    Check out Dr. B's article on aches and pains. Best summary I've read.
    Well said.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Provo, Utah
    Posts
    515

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by I_iz_a_fatass View Post
    After open heart surgery all I wanted to do was lie in bed; nothing I'd been through in life to that point hurt as much as I did then. Three days post-op I was told "to try to walk the hall four times today".
    Damn dude. Wow. Good on you for getting back under the bar!

    Quote Originally Posted by I_iz_a_fatass View Post
    Lifting taught me waiting to want to do things means they never get done.
    In our gym we have a saying--particularly on volume days--when someone is standing around delaying getting under the bar, "Dude...the bar isn't getting any lighter."

    I've found in life procrastination with just about everything doesn't make the "bar" get any lighter.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    The Strength Lab
    Posts
    7,963

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    I've learned to Embrace The Pain

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •