starting strength gym
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Thoughts on Shoulder Bursitis

  1. #1

    Default Thoughts on Shoulder Bursitis

    Hi Rip,

    (if needed: Male, 29, 200lbs at 5'10, bench: 190, ohp: 120)

    I've started lifting in April and recently been diagnosed with bursitis on my right shoulder (via MRI).

    Does this indicate that I'm doing something wrong on the bench and/or overhead press? I've searched the forum but couldn't really find your opinion on this topic - i.e., what causes it and how to deal with it.

    My doctor said that my humerus was elevated by too strong delts and too tight back muscles (that can't do their job). Now I should roll around on a Lacross Ball to loosen my back, and stop pressing. I guess thats not what your advice would be at all.
    Do you have any general thoughts on this?

    I'm happy to give you more information if needed.

    Thank you!

    BR,
    Phil

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    38,125

    Default

    The doctor thinks that your right humerus was elevated and mashed into your subacromial bursa because your right deltoid was "too strong," and that back muscles that are "too tight" cannot do "their job"? After looking at the relevant anatomy, does this sound even remotely plausible to you?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    1,650

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PhilippMurry View Post
    Hi Rip,

    (if needed: Male, 29, 200lbs at 5'10, bench: 190, ohp: 120)

    I've started lifting in April and recently been diagnosed with bursitis on my right shoulder (via MRI).

    Does this indicate that I'm doing something wrong on the bench and/or overhead press? I've searched the forum but couldn't really find your opinion on this topic - i.e., what causes it and how to deal with it.

    My doctor said that my humerus was elevated by too strong delts and too tight back muscles (that can't do their job). Now I should roll around on a Lacross Ball to loosen my back, and stop pressing. I guess thats not what your advice would be at all.
    Do you have any general thoughts on this?

    I'm happy to give you more information if needed.

    Thank you!

    BR,
    Phil
    What is your occupation?

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks for the responds. That was quick.

    @Rip: It doesn't seem plausible. My thoughts were: If my back muscles are too tight, why aren't they actually pulling the humerus down? Didn't really make sense to me afterwards. But I'm fairly new to this and haven't gotten the whole picture yet.

    @Will Morris: I'm a programmer, but not the good kind like you people (for strength), but for computers.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    38,125

    Default

    The "back" muscles attached to your humerus keep the head of the humerus seated in the glenoid fossa. This is discussed in the blue book. I think you're beginning to get the picture.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    1,650

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PhilippMurry View Post
    Thanks for the responds. That was quick.

    @Rip: It doesn't seem plausible. My thoughts were: If my back muscles are too tight, why aren't they actually pulling the humerus down? Didn't really make sense to me afterwards. But I'm fairly new to this and haven't gotten the whole picture yet.

    @Will Morris: I'm a programmer, but not the good kind like you people (for strength), but for computers.
    Subacromial bursitis is heavily influenced by certain occupations. Occupations that require a lot of computer work are notorious for causing subacromial bursitis.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    38,125

    Default

    And by benching incorrectly. This is also discussed in the book.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    1,650

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    And by benching incorrectly. This is also discussed in the book.
    Absolutely. My subtle point was that the physician gave him a bullshit non-answer as to what caused his problem, instead of the known answer of, "Your job causes this. Sitting on your ass in front of a computer all day has made you weak. Learn how to bench, press, and Deadlift correctly and you will be fine."

  9. #9

    Default

    Thank you both very much for the help!

    I will reread the pressing chapters, post some form checks for the bench press, and quit my current job.
    (or maybe I'll just keep getting stronger until my occupation is not a problem anymore).

    Until I fixed all of that, I take ibuprofen to take care of the inflammation (unfortunately you need a prespcription from the doctor to get it, so I will run out of it pretty soon).

    Happy new year Rip and Will!

    Philipp

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    38,125

    Default

    In what backward location do you live where ibuprofen is available by prescription? It's basically free in Texas at Walmart.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •