Training Martial Arts Students Training Martial Arts Students

starting strength gym
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Training Martial Arts Students

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    95

    Default Training Martial Arts Students

    • phoenix arizona seminar date
    • texas seminar date
    Coach,

    As you probably know, Judo and BJJ students require explosive power, especially Judo.

    I got a hold of this program that you may have approved.

    I have some questions about it.

    1. Why is it 2 days a week lifting instead of 3? Is it because the athlete will get tired with all the martial arts training?

    2. How do we determine intermediate? Is it when we work to the stall and then reset once? When we reset, what weight do we reset to (is it the 5-10% I read on stef's thread: Starting Strength I understand from this thread that is difficult: Ideal strength to weight ratios

    3. Under intermediate, what does it mean reps are done at interval for the power clean?

    4. On the days we are not lifting: We've watched the videos on the prowler but we do not know how far we push it and how many sets. Do we follow this: Death by Prowler | Matt Reynolds

    5. Farmer's walk. How far do we walk with the weight? Do we increase this each time?

    6. Under intermediate, what is the + sign for? Is this where we add weight?

    So here is what we think you have approved:

    Two day per week lifting programs for judo.

    The Texoma Judo Novice Strength Program

    * Based on Rippetoe's Starting Strength- modified.
    * Three weeks on, one week deload. Work to the stall, then reset once.

    A:
    Power clean 5x2
    Squat 3x5
    Bench 3x5
    Chin 3x10-15

    B:
    Power clean 5x2
    Squat 3x5 (or front squat 5x3)
    Press 3x5
    Deadlift 1x5

    **********
    The Texoma Judo Intermediate Strength Program

    * Based on Wendler's 531 for the power lifts.
    * Based on Grimes' scheme for Olympic lifts.
    * Notated as week1/week2/week3. Week 4 is deload.

    A:
    Power snatch 6x2/6x2/3x2,5x1 (work for heaviest set)
    Squat 1x5+/1x3+/1x5,1x3,1x1+/deload
    Bench 1x5+/1x3+/1x5,1x3,1x1+/deload
    Weighted chins 3x5-10

    B:
    Power clean: 10@60s/10@75s/10@90s (same weight every set. Reps are done on the @ interval. e.g. 1 per 60sec, etc.)
    Front squat 5x3/7x2/10x1 (work to heaviest set)
    Press 1x5+/1x3+/1x5,1x3,1x1+/deload
    Deadlift 1x5+/1x3+/1x5,1x3,1x1+/deload

    **********
    Program notes:
    * You do this. That's it. I'd recommend another day or two of agility work, complexes, and sprints/prowler work, but that's another topic.

    * You add a bit of weight to powercleans each week (not every day). It should feel a little lighter on B day. This is practice day.

    * You can back squat both days if you want (that's what I recommend starting out). If you feel tweaked, if deadlifting is hard after squatting, or if you just want to front squat, then you can alternate.

    * If you can do 3x15 dead hang chins, then you need to add weight to keep the reps between 10 and 15.

    * If you have extra time at the end, do farmers walks. Great ROI.

    * All work sets sets are "sets across" (same weight for each set). Do 3-4 warmup sets (always start with the empty bar) to get there.

    * Add ten pounds per week to squat, five pounds per week to your presses, and 5 or fewer pounds per week to power clean.

    * Once the weights feel heavy the gains slow, work for 3 weeks and deload for 1 week.

    E.g. for squats:
    week 1 405x5x3
    week 2 415x5x3
    week 3 425x5x3
    week 4 225x5x3 (or go play soccer)
    week 5 435x5x3 (or 425x5x3 if you need to)
    etc.

    ***When you record your workouts, it is weight x reps x sets.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    39,678

    Default

    Never seen it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    27

    Default

    This seems like such a poor mans butchered program. Iím no expert at all but have made progress doing ss as written while training mma 3x a week, I was 24 and just made sure to eat as much as possible. I currently use an hlm routine and when my training picks up I donít add any drop sets and realize that Iíll be lucky to maintain my lifts, and when I focus more on strength I back off mma a bit. No need for this long winded nonsense imo but Iíve been humbled on this subject before

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    39,678

    Default

    More importantly, explosion is not trainable to any significant degree, while strength is quite trainable for years. Who cleans more weight, the guy with the 500 deadlift or the guy with the 200 deadlift? Who is more powerful? Who can jerk your ass around harder? And why in hell would anybody except a competitive Olympic lifter waste time doing front squats? And the upshot here is this: what's the fastest way to get stronger? My thoughts on that are detailed here:

    Practical Programming for Strength Training | The Aasgaard Company

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    95

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    More importantly, explosion is not trainable to any significant degree, while strength is quite trainable for years. Who cleans more weight, the guy with the 500 deadlift or the guy with the 200 deadlift? Who is more powerful? Who can jerk your ass around harder? And why in hell would anybody except a competitive Olympic lifter waste time doing front squats? And the upshot here is this: what's the fastest way to get stronger? My thoughts on that are detailed here:

    Practical Programming for Strength Training | The Aasgaard Company
    Coach,

    This makes it much simpler then. For now, we can just stick with the basic SS program for 99.999% of all students, right?

    I think practical programming is the only book I haven't read so I just ordered it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Akron, OH
    Posts
    1,043

    Default

    Stick with simplicity. LP works, but it doesn't go as long, because they're so beat up from both the sport and the lifting. Heavy/Light/Medium and 4 day split works very well for BJJ. Although it also works really well with everyone else.

    You need to keep the focus on their sport. If you prioritize the lifting to the detriment of the sport, they will resent you and quit. Progress will be slower because you'll make accommodations for the sport side. HLM allows you to make on the fly modifications that won't ruin the programming.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    39,678

    Default

    I'd rather see them squat/press/deadlift on day 1 and squat/bench/deadlift on day 2, adding weight once or twice a week, and that's all. It would be hard for sports practice to curtail progress on this simple approach.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    95

    Default

    Thank you very much!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Murphysboro, IL
    Posts
    29,113

    Default

    I can't speak to BJJ, I never did it, but the premise that Judo requires explosiveness is flawed. A few (maybe 6 or more) hip and shoulder throws are aided by explosiveness, but this leaves out the far larger bulk of the other throws, sweeps, chokes, arm bars, and pins that comprise Judo. But then again, it seems all too many judokas, and their Sensei's in particular, get transfixed by those flashy exceptions to the larger sport and art.

    IMO, the explosiveness trained in cleans can help with the rising hip extensions that get the thrower under the other guy's center of gravity (their hips). It helps, but is hardly the most important aspect of the technique. A good strong and steady pull, as is developed by deadlifts and chins, is more useful when used in conjunction with the right timing and inducing an off balance posture in the other guy. That pull doesn't have to be explosive, and the way the hips are used to execute the pull is different than that used for cleans. In other words, the pulls used in Judo seldom involve straight lines when executed effectively.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    33

    Default

    starting strength nutrition camp
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    And why in hell would anybody except a competitive Olympic lifter waste time doing front squats?
    As a general rule that's probably correct.

    However, 2 of the best powerlifters of all time, Dan Green and Chris Duffin, routinely do front squats and really like them. In fact, Dan Green does them every week and has said that, "The best exercise for improving my squat has been the front squat."

    When I used to train at MetroFlex in Arlington circa 2004-2005 time frame, I used to watch Ronnie Coleman do front squats quite a bit.

    So, in certain circumstances, front squats have their place beyond Olympic weightlifting.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •