Do I correct my posture before I continue with the program Do I correct my posture before I continue with the program

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Thread: Do I correct my posture before I continue with the program

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
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    12

    Default Do I correct my posture before I continue with the program

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    After a conversation with Will Morris regarding using SS as a method of gaining strength after having me elbow surgically repaired, I was set on using your linear progression.

    After taking a week to figure out form before putting on a substantial weight and completing week 1 of the program. I have discovered that issues with my posture may be sabotaging my form with weight on the bar. For clarity, I have a very rounded back and shoulders from working at standard desks and chairs in highschool as a 6'5 male, nerd neck and, as I was recently told, anterior tilted pelvis. Please see this image for a better look, apologies for the titties: Imgur: The magic of the Internet

    While I have found that my posture doesn't decease my ability to carry out most of the lifts, I find it does with the press. When I do the press, I find that at my work weight I can't get the 4th or 5th rep out without the pelvis slipping back and rounding my lower back quite a bit.

    I am due to meet my doctor in a couple weeks for other issues, but am planning on asking to see a physiotherapist to ask about correction besides what I've seen on the internet. However, I'm curious about what you have to say. What would you suggest I do to fix this poor posture and/or should I halt the program until my posture is in better condition?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
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    39,672

    Default

    Are you under the impression that "posture" is involuntary?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    74

    Default

    My two cents, based on my own experience:
    Focus on form, especially in the press and in finishing the deadlift, and your upper body posture problems will improve on their own. As your back and shoulders get stronger it will be easier for them to hold your body in proper posture as you go about your day-- but like Rip says, you still need to be conscious about it.

    I'm confused about what you describe with the press, though. If you have anterior pelvic tilt, your spine will be slightly hyper extended already. If you're "rounding" your lower back, that sounds like spinal flexion...and that's not likely caused by your pelvic tilt. So, clarify?

    I also had a moderate amount of anterior pelvic tilt and found that I had to stretch my hip flexors fairly regularly for a while in order to allow it to resolve itself. But honestly, getting weight on the bar and strengthening the lower back with squats and deadlifts did woners for my pelvic positioning.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
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    12

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    I'm not under that impression, I fully acknowledge that my poor posture is a result of my own negligence and lack of maintenance of a proper posture. I just mention the desks because before my epiphany after my accident to become a strong an useful person in society I was lazy.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Thanks for your reply, I really appreciate it.

    To clarify what I meant about the press firstly, when I set up I consciously try to get my pelvis and back into best form I can before beginning the pressing motion. However as I press, the pelvis tilts further and my lower back rounds more as my muscles that maintain the posture fatigue due to being underused, as my rudimentary logic puts at the cause. Could I possibly get some advice on how to prevent this from happening?

    I will continue the program and make a more conscious effort with my posture. I will probably continue doing the stretching and strengthening routines I got from Jeremy Ethiers channel in the meantime to aid in this process

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    74

    Default

    Well, specific to the press, I'd suggest videoing it and posting it in the technique forum. Because based on your description I'm still not able to visualize what's happening.

    Generally speaking, though, any form breakdown in the lower back is best solved by 1) firmly ingraining what the proper position feels like, and 2) getting your lower back stronger. The best way to do that is to keep doing the squats and deadlifts as laid out in the program.

    As far as the pelvic tilt. Your body has gotten used to an exaggerated lordotic curve (ass out, belly protruding a bit) and you'll have to actively fight that. Get used to keeping your chest up and shoulders back, and your hips tucked forward. Squeeze your glutes a bit to keep your hips forward as your standing or walking. And if you spend a lot of time sitting, get up and stretch your hip flexors every hour or so, because they have gotten tight over time and will keep pulling your pelvis down if you let them.

    With regard to your lifts, focus on leaning over more in the squat than you want to. Nipples point to the floor. Pay very close attention to the deadlift chapter where it discusses exaggerated lordotic curve. Work on eliminating that and getting used to what proper spinal extension feels like. Once you understand the position, learn to set your back hard in order to maintain it through the movement.

    With the press, work on the hip rebound as described in the book. It's very difficult to achieve this with your pelvis tilted forward. This is where I found stretching to be the most helpful. I did a stretch that is basically a lunge, but with the rear foot resting on a flat bench. That gets your hip flexors loose enough to actually get an effective hip rebound for the press.

    It may take a couple of months for it all to come together, but following the program and getting stronger should create marked improvements in your posture. Then it's just a matter of maintaining that posture when you're not in the gym.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    96

    Default

    You are going to discover, in bits and pieces, what good posture feels like when doing the exercises correctly.

    Strength training IS corrective exercise.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    27

    Default

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    Donít be stubborn like myself and think you have to figure out everything yourself. Get an SS coach from 3 months at the least to as long as you can afford it. Spend the money. You will spin your wheels a lot less once you do that. My own form is better and more consistent with my friends help. It takes work and gumption and sticking with it. Remember, you donít have to be the best at it. You just have to be stronger.

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